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Full text of "Bulletin of Armstrong State College"

y 






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in 2012 with funding from 

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Bulletin or 



ARMSTRONG 
STATE COLLEGE 



Savannah, Georgia 



Catalogue 1970-1971 







ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS 



1. ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

Prsident 

Dean of Student Affairs 

Registrar 

Comptroller 

Community Services 

2. VICTOR HALL 

Education Dept. 

History & Political Science Dept. 

Psychology Dept. 

3. GAMBLE HALL 

Business Dept. 

English Dept. 

Foreign Language Dept. 

4. SCIENCE HALL 

Biology Dept. 
Math Dept. 
Phvsics Dept. 

5. SOLMS HALL 

Chemistry Dept. 
Dental Hygiene Dept. 
Nursing Dept. 



6. JENKINS HALL 

Art Dept. 
Music Dept. 

7. STUDENT SERVICE 

Bookstore 
Infirmary 
Snackbar 
Mail 

8. MEMORIAL STUDENT CENTER 

Cafeteria 

Director of Student Activities 
Student Government 
Student Lounge 

9. LANE LIBRARY 

10. MAINTENANCE BUILDING 

11. GYMNASIUM & POOL 
Athletic Director 

P. E. Dept. 

12. STUDENT PARKING AREA 



Bulletin oi 



ARMSTRON G 
STATE COLLEGE 



avanna 



h, G 



eorgia 



751SS4 



A Four- Year College of the 
University System of Georgia 



SUMMER FALL 




The college is o«m'« of or>6 re- 
grets the prints errors in this 
Edition of th« bulletin. These 

1 errors will be corrected in a 
new edition now under pre- 
paration. 



WINTER SPRING 



1970-1971 



Volume XXXV 



Number 10 



Membership in 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
Association of Georgia Colleges 

American Association for Colleges of 
Teacher Education 



1970 CALENDAR 1970 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


1971 CALENDAR 1971 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 




S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 



CONTENTS 



1 I NDAR 



GOVERNING BOARD; ADMINISTRATION & F \< II. n 9 

Members of the Board of Regents 
Staff of i Ik- Board of Regents 
Officers of Administration 

Heads of Departments 

Administrative Staff 

The Faculty 

Armstrong College Commission 

PURPOSES AND PROGRAMS 21 

Four-Year Degrees 

Two-Year Degrees 

Pre-Professional Programs 

History of the College 

Library 

Office of Community Services 

Evening Classes 

Industrial Co-op Program 

Student Exchane Program with Savannah State College 

. ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 24 

General Information 
Requirements for Freshman Applicants 
Advanced Placement 
Quarter-On -Trial 

Requirements for Transfer Applicants 
Special Students 
Auditors 

Readmission of Former Students 
Transient Students 

Armstrong State College High School Accelerated Program 
Foreign Students 
Admission of Veterans 

Applicants Sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation 
Financial Aid 

Registration and Orientation 
Residency Requirements of the Board of Regents 

Admission to: 

Associate in Arts Degree inNursing 

Associate in Science Degree in Dental Hygiene 

Associate in Arts Degree in Police Administration 

\ 3 



IV. FEES .. .._ 

Application Fee 
Matrication Fee 
Out of State Tuition 
Student Activity Fee 
Late Registration Fee 
Change of Schedule Fee 
Graduation Fee 
Transcript Fee 
Music Fee 
Make-up Test Fee 
Short Courses 
Summary of Fees 
Privilege Fees 
Refunds 

V. FINANCIAL AIDS _____ 

Scholarships 

Regents' Scholarships 

Educational Opportunity Grants 

National Defense Student Loans 

Georgia Higher Education Assistance Corporation 

Law Enforcement Education Program 

Nursing Student Loan Program 

Barney Minkoff Paderewski Scholarship Memorial Fund 

Finanrial Aid Application Proledure 

Other Sourses of Finanrial Aid to Armstrong State College 

Work-Study Program 

Student Assistant Program 

VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Honor System 

Arademic Advisement 

Academic Advisement for Students on Academic Probation 

Relating to Degree Requirements 

Course and Study Load 

Classification of Students 

Permission for Overload or Courses at Another College 

Reports and Grades 

Honors 

Attendance 

Physical Education Program 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

Dropping Courses 

Withdrawing from College 

Auditing 

System-Wide Achievement Testing Program 



,'u. s liDi \ i si rvices, \c nvi I IES 

Academic Advisement 
Counseling Sei \ u es 

Orientation 

Placement Office 

Condiu t 

Student Activities and Organizations 

Student Government 

Student Publications 

Health 

Alumni Office 

Housing 

Housing 

Atheletics 

Cultural Opportunities 

Student Code of Conduct 
III. DEGREE PROGRAMS 73 

Core Curriculum 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 

Teacher Education Programs 

Bachelog of Business Administration 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

Associate in Arts in Nursing 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education 

Associate in Arts in Police Administration 

Associate in Arts 

Complete List of Major Programs of Four Year 
and Two Year Degrees 
X. DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS AND REQUIRE- 
MENTS FOR MAJORS .... 93 

Allied Health 

Biology 

Business Administration 

Chemistry and Physics 

Education 

English 

Fine Arts 

Foreign Language 

History and Political Science 

Mathematics 

Physical Education 

Police Administration 

Psychology and Sociology 
NDEX 1 5 1 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1970-1971 



May 
June 
June 

July 

August 



September 



22 



12 

15 

16 

17 

14 

20-24 

7 

1011 

12-14 

18 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1970 

Last day for freshman and transfer students to file 
all papers required in the application for ad- 



mission. 



Last day for transient students (for Summer Quar- 
ter only) to file all papers required in the ap- 
plication for admission. 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to enroll in any class 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for the Fall Quarter 

Last day of class 

Reading Dap 

Examinations 

Graduation 



FALU QUARTER, 1970 

Last day for freshman and transfer students 
file all papers required in the application for 
mission. 



to 
ad- 



15 


First Faculty Meeting 


17, 18, 21 


Orientation 


24,25 


Registration 


28 


Classes begin 


29 


Last day to register for credit 


30 


Last day to enroll in any class 


October 30 


Mid-term reports due 


November 9-13 


Pre-advisement for the Winter Quarter 


November 26-27 


Thanksgiving Holidays (Begin at 12:30 P. M. 




Nov. 25) 


December 4 


Last day of classes 


December 7-8 


Reading Days 


9-11 


Examinations 


14 


Christmas Vacation Begins 



on 



WINTER QUARTER, 1971 

December 14 Last day for freshman and transfei students to file 

all papers required in the application for ad- 



mission. 



4 Registration 

5 (lasses begin 

6 Lasl day to register for credit 

7 Lad day to enrol] In any class 

8 Mid-term reports due 

15-19 Pre-advisement for Spring Quarter 

11 Last day of classes 

12 Reading day 
15-17 Examinations 

18 Spring recess 



SPRING QUARTER, 1971 

Last day for freshman and transfer students to 
file all papers required in the application for 
admission. 



24 


Registration 


25 


Classes begin 


26 


Last day to register for credit 


29 


Last day to enroll in any class 


21 


Mid-term reports due 


3-7 


Pre-advisement for the Summer Quarter. 


12 


Honors Day Assembly 


31 


Last day of classes 


1 


Reading day 


24 


Examinations 


8 


Graduation 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1971 

21 Last day for freshman and transfer students to file 

all papers required in the application for ad- 
mission. 

4 Last day for transient students (for Summer Quar- 

ter only) to file all papers required in the ap- 
plication for admission. 

14 Registration 

15 Classes begin 

16 Last day to register for credit 

17 Last day to enroll in any class 
13 Mid-term reports due 

19-23 Pre-advisement for the Fall Quarter 

9 Last day of class 

10 Reading day 

11-13 Examinations 

17 Graduation 



FALL QUARTER, 1971 



September 1 


Last day for freshman and transfer students to file 
all papers required in the application for ad- 
mission. 


14 

16, 17, 20 


First Faculty Meeting 
Orientation 


22 


Advisement of sophomores, juniors, and seniors 


23-24 
27 

September 28 
29 

October 29 


Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to enroll in any class 

Mid-term reports due 


November 8-12 


Pre-advisement for the Winter Quarter 


25-26 


Thanksgiving Holidays (Begin at 12:30 P. M. on 
November 24) 


December 3 


Last day of classes 


6 
7-9 


Reading day 
Examinations 


10 


Christmas Vacation Begins 



Armstrong State College is committed to the offering of equal educa- 
tional opportunity to all students regardless of race, creed, or nationality. 
8 



I. Governing Board, 

Administration and Faculty 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

. HIRAM STANLEY, Chairman Columbus 

JOHN W. LANGDALE, Vice Chairman Valdosta 

JACK ADAIR Atlanta 

JOHN A. BELL, JR Dublin 

W. LEE BURGE Atlanta 

(AMES V. CARMICHAEL Marietta 

G. L. DICKENS, JR. Milledgeville 

JAMES A. DUNLAP Gainesville 

ROY V. HARRIS Augusta 

WILLIAM S. MORRIS, III Augusta 

JAMES C. OWEN, JR Griffin 

I MRS. PATRICIA PETERSON Ailey 

JOHN R. RICHARDSON Conyers 

JOHN I. SPOONER . Donalsonville 

CAREY WILLIAMS Greensboro 



STAFF OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

George L. Simpson, Jr. Chancellor 

H. F. Robinson Vice Chancellor 

James L. Carmon Assistant Vice Chancellor 

— Computing Systems 

Frank C. Dunham Director, Construction 

and Physical Plant 

Mario J. Goglia Vice Chancellor - Research 

Robert M. Joiner Director of Public Affairs 

Shealy E. McCoy Vice Chancellor - 

Fiscal Affairs and Treasurer 

Henry G. Neal Executive Secretary 

Haskin R. Pounds Assistant Vice Chancellor 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Henry L. Ashmore President 

H. Dean Propst Dean of the College 

James T. Rogers Dean of Student Affairs 

Donald D. Anderson Associate Dean for 

Community Services 

Jule R. Stanfield Comptroller 

Joseph L. Adams, Jr. Assistant Comptroller 

9 



George S. Hunnicutt Registrar 

Vrginia M. Arey Admissions Officer 

Joseph A. Buck Director of Student Activities 

Lynn Benson Counselor and Psychometrist 

William F. Tyrrell, Jr. Director of Public Information 

Jack H. Padgett Director, Campus Services 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

Doris Bates Allied Health Services 

Leslie B. Davenport, Jr. Biology 

Orange W. Hall Business Administration 

Fretwell G. Crider Chemistry and Physics 

William W. Stokes Education 

Hugh Pendexter, /// English and Speech 

J. Harry Persse Fine Arts 

William L. Easterling Foreign Languages 

Evans C. Johnson History and Political Science 

Regina Yoast Librarian 

John S. Hinkel (Acting Head) Mathematics 

Roy J. Sims Physical Education 

Lawrence E. Mahany (Coordinator) Police Administration 

Clarke S. Worthington Psychology and Sociology 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Miss Marjorie A. Mosely Secretary to the President 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Carter Secretary to the Dean of the College 

Mrs. Virginia D. Nall Administrative Assistant to the 

Dean of Student Affairs 

Mrs. Louise W. Wilkins Secretary to the Dean of 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Doris Cole Secretary to the Director of 

Student Activities 

Mrs. Margaret J. Sharpton Secretary to the Registrar 

Mrs. Joyce Weldy Secretary to Registrar for Records 

Miss Roslyn Daniel Transcript Credit Analyst 

Mrs. Harriet Karlin Secretary, Admissions 

Mrs. Bertis Jones /. B. M. Operator 

Mrs. Vicki W. Wilbur L B. M. Operator 

Mrs. Naomi Lantz Secretaiy to the Associate 

Dean for Community Services 

Mrs. Eugenia Edwards Head, Circulation Department 

Mrs. Mae C. Rushing Circulation Assistant 

Mrs. Susie S. Chirbas Catalog Assistant 

Mrs. Patricia Adler Catalog Assistant 

Mrs. Hazel P. Thompson Serials Assistant 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Salter Secretary to the Librarian 

Mrs. Corinne H. McGee Assistant to the Comptroller 

Mrs. Becky Martin Secretary to the Comptroller 

Mrs. Rosemary Anglin Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Jane Holland Cashier 

10 



Mrs. Pk.cv b. Sironc secretary to the Departments of 

History and Political Science, 
<md Psychology and Sociology 
\Iks. Rebecka Pattillo Secretary to the Department of 

Mathematit $ 
Mrs. Frances D. MoGlohon Secretary to the Department of 

Education 

Mrs. VIRGINIA I). WlLLCOX Administrative Assistant to tlie 

Head of the Department of Allied Health Services 

Mrs. Mary K. Rvles Secretary to the Departments of 

English and Speech, Foreign 
Languages, and Fine Arts 

Miss Betty Parker Secretary to the Department of Biology 

Mrs. Maude E. Smith Secretary to the Department of 

Business Administration 

Mrs. Edith A. Ladd Secretary to the Department of 

Chemistry and Physics, and 
Police Administration 

Mrs. Jo Ann Hartline Secretary to the Department of 

Physical Education 

Mrs. Betty B. Hunnicut Secretary to the Director of 

Public Information 

Richard F. Baker Superintendent, Buildings and Grounds 

[ra Ryan ] Assistant Superintendent, 

Buildings and Grounds 

(Miss Brenda J. Knight Secretary, Buildings and Grounds 

Thomas Nease Manager, Student Center 

Miss Elizabeth Pound Manager, Book Store 

Mrs. Jo Weeks Campus Nurse 

Mrs. Launa Johns Receptionist, PBX Operator 

Augustus M. Stalnaker Supervisor of Mail 



THE FACULTY 

BILL E. ALEXANDER, A. B., Morris Harvey College; M. E., Georgia 
Southern College 

Athletic Director and 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

M. LORRAINE ANCHORS, A.B., M.A., Baylor University 
Professor of English 

DONALD D. ANDERSON, B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., 

Peabody College; Eel. D., Auburn University 

Associate Dean for Community Services 

HENRY L. ASHMORE, B.A.E., M.A.E., D. ED., University of Florida 

President 

*ARDELLA PATRICIA BALL, A.B., Fisk University; M.S.L.S., Atlanta 
University 

Assistant Professor 
Cataloger 

11 



DORIS W. BATES, B.S., Simmons College; M.S., Boston University 
Head, Department of Allied Health Services 
Associate Professor of Nursing and Dental Hygiene 

GEORGE H. BEDWELL, B.S., Sanford University; M.A., University 
of Alabama 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

W. ORSON BEECHER, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia 

Professor of History 

DOROTHY G. BELL, B. S. N. Ed., University of Georgia; M. N., Emory 
University 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

ALEX D. BELTZ, B.A., M.A., Walla Walla College; B.A. of Ed., Wes- 
tern Washington State; Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Associate Professor of Biology 

*CARYL JEAN BELTZ, B. Mus., University of Southern California; 
M. Mus., Lewis and Clark College 

Assistant Professor of Applied Music (Piano) 

LYNN BENSON, A.B., M. Ed., University of Georgia 
Counselor and Psychometrist 

SARVAN K. BHATIA, B.A., M.A., Punjah University; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University 

Professor of Economics 

ROSE MARIE BLASE, B.S. in Nursing, Mt. St. Agnes College; M.S., 
University of Maryland 

Instructor in Nursing 

SALLY L. BLITCH, B.S., Armstrong State College 
Instructor in Dental Hygiene 

MADALINE P. BONEY, A.B., Winthrop College; M. Ed., Georgia 
Southern College 

Assistant Professor of History 

JOHN G. BREWER, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

**S. KENT BROOKS, B.A., M.A., The University of Texas 
Assistant Professor of English 

*JOHN H. BROWER, B.S., University of Maine; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Massachusetts 

Professor of Biology 

MOONYEAN S. BROWER, B.S., M.A., University of Massachusetts 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

HUGH R. BROWN, B.S., Xavier University; M.A.T., St. Michael's 
College 

Assistant Professor of English 



•i 



12 






VAYLAND BROWN, B.A., Emory University; M.A., University of 
Washington 

Assistant Projcssur of Mathematics 

OSEPH A. BUCK, B.A., Auburn University; M.S., Florida State Uni- 
versity 

Director of Student Activities 

JAMES WALTER CARTER, A.B., M.A., University of Florida 

Instructor in English and Applied Music (Organ) 

ROSS L. CLARK, B.A., Tulane University 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

BERNARD J. COMASKEY, B.A., Fordham College; M.A., New York 
University 

Assistant Professor of History 

•RANCIS P. COYLE, B.A., Fordham University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, A.B., Emory University; M.A., Georgetown Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Florida State University 

Professor of Political Science 



FRETWELL G. CRIDER, B.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Head, Department of Chemistry and Physics 
Professor of Chemistry 

BETTY C. DALLAS, B.S., West Liberty State College 
Instructor in Dental Hygiene 

LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, JR., B.S., College of Charleston, M.S., Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Head, Department of Biology 
Professor of Biology 

LAMAR W. DAVIS, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; Certified 
Public Accountant 

Professor of Business Administration 

•DORIS ELAINE DEALING, B.A., M.A., University of Denver 

Instructor in English 

WILLIAM R. DeCASTRO, B.S., Florida Southern College; M.B.A., 
University of Oklahoma 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

•MARGARET ANN DORROH, B.S.N., Vanderbilt University 

Instructor in Nursing 

NANCY DUFFY, B.S., University of Iowa 

Instructor in Nursing 

JOHN DONALD DUNCAN, B.S., College of Charleston, M.A., Uni- 
versity of South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of History 

*MARY LOUISE DYKES, B.S., College of St. Elizabeth 

Instructor in Nutrition (Allied Health Services) 

13 



WILLIAM L. EASTERLING, B.S., Western Carolina College; M.A., 
Middlebury College; Ph.D.. University of Georgia; Diploma, Sor- 
bonne, France 

Head, Department of Foreign Languages 
Professor of French and Spanish 

MARIANNA A. ELDREDGE, B.S., M.S., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

JOHN FINDEIS, B.S., M.S., University of Illinois 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 






*JULIAN R. FRIEDMAN, B.A., Emory University; LL.B., University 
of Georgia; LL.M., New York University 

Instructor in Business Administration 

JIMM1E F. GROSS, B.A., Baylor University: B.D., Southern Baptist 
Seminary; M.A., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of History 

ORANGE W. HALL, B.S., Air Force Institute of Technology; M.B.A., 
Hofstra College; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Head, Department of Business Administration 
Professor of Business Administration 

JOHN R. HANSEN, B.S., Troy State College; M. Ed., University of 
Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

HENRY E. HARRIS, B.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

* RICHARD M. HARRIS, B.S., Auburn University; M.B.A., Emory 
LTniversity 

Instructor in Business Administration 

RICHARD HAUNTON, A.B., A.M., Indiana University; Ph.D., Emory 
University 

Associate Professor of History 

♦TED HENKLE, Diploma, Julliard School of Music 
Instructor in Applied Music (Violin) 

RAYMOND L. HILL, B.S., United States Military Academy; B.S.C.E., 
University of California; M.S., University o^ Florida 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

JOHN S. HINKEL, M.S., Unversity of Florida; Ph.D., University of 
South Carolina 

Acting Head, Department of Mathematics 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

♦BARBARA A. HOFER, First Flutist, Savannah Symphony Orchestra 
Instructor in Applied Music (Flute) 

♦ALPHIA MILJJS HUGHES, B.S.E., Arkansas State Teachers College; 
M.S., Louisiana State University 

Assistant Professor 
Cataloger 

14 



Gl.okci S. HUNNICU I I . B.S., M.S., East I ennessee State Universit) 

Registrar 

MARVIN V.JENKINS, B.S., M.A., University oi Georgia 
Assistant Professoi o} English 

MAX I. fOHNS, B.B.A., M.A., University <>! Georgia 
Assistant Professor o) Economics 

HI 1 IV 1). JOHNSON, A.B., M.A., Stetson University; M.S.L.S., Col- 
umhia University 

Ass is (a nt Professor 
Head Cataloger 

IVANS C. JOHNSON, A.B., MA., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Head, Department of History and Political Science 
Professor of History 

*() IIS SAMUEL JOHNSON, A. A., Armstrong State College; A.B., Uni- 
versity ol" Georgia; M.S.W.; Atlanta University. 

Instructor in Sociology 

JAMES LAND JONES, B.A., University of Tulsa; M.A., Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Tnlane University 

Associate Professor of English 

•JAMES \\. KELSAW, B.A., Tab clega College; M.A., Eisk Univers- 
ity; Ph.D., Washington State University. 

Callaway Professor of Sociology, Savannah State College 

JOSEPH 1. KILLORIN, A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 

University 

Callaway Professor of Literature and Philosophy 

MICHAEL A. LaBURTIS, B.B.A., University of Cineinnati; M.B.A., 
Bowling Green State University 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

OSMOS LANIER, JR., B.A., LaGrange College; ALA., Auburn Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of History 

*E. BENTLEY LIPSCOMB, B.B.A., University of Georgia; M.S.W., 
Florida State University 

Instructor in Sociology 

MARGARET S. LUBS, B. Mus., Converse College; B.A., University of 
Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 

Professor of English and French 

JOHN C. MCCARTHY, JR., B.B.A., University of Miami; M.B.A., Ph. 
D., University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

*ELMO M. McCRAY, JR., B.S., M.S., University of Alabama 

Instructor in Biology 

KENNETH P. McKlNNELL, B.F.A., M.F.A., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Art 

15 



♦CHARLES A. McMURRAY, JR., B.S., High Point College; M.A., Ur 
versity of North Carolina 

Instructor in Chemistry 

♦LAWRENCE E. MAHANY, A.B., St. Mary's College; M.S., Michigc 
State University 

Co-ordinator , Police Administration 
Assistant Processor of Police Administration 

ANNE MAYER, B.S., M.A., Columbia University 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

ROBERT E. L. MORGAN, B.B.A., M.A., Memphis State Unive 
sity; Certified Public Accountant 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 

♦ABRAHAM R. NEIMAN, LL.B., St. John's University 
Instructor in Business Administration 

SAMUEL L. NEWBERRY, JR., B.S. Ed., M. Ed., Ed. D., Universi 
of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Education 

JOHN F. NEWMAN, B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Georgetov 
University; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

DAVID A. NOBLE, A.B., A.M., Boston University 
Assistant Professor of German 

♦ELLIOT H. PALEFSKY, B.S., University of Georgia; Ed. M., Temp 
University 

Instructor in Psychology 

♦JOHN M. PARR, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering and Mathematics 

ROBERT L. PATTERSON, B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan College; M.A 
University of Kentucky 

Assistant Professor of History 

JACK H. PADGETT, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University of Nort 
Carolina 

Director } Campus Services 

C. GLENN PEARCE, B.B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., New Yoi 

University 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

HUGH PENDEXTER, III, A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Northwester 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Head, Department of English and Speech 
Professor of English 

J. HARRY PERSSE, B.F.A., University of Georgia; M.M., D. Mu< 
Florida State University 

Head, Department of Fine Arts 
Professor of Music 

ROBERT I. PHILLIPS, D.M.D., Harvard School of Dental Median 
Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 

16 



LLEN I.. PINGEL, B.A., M \ I . University <>i North Carolina 

Assistant I'rofesso) of Biology 

\ DEAN PROPST, B.A., Wake Foresi College; M \ , Ph.D., Peabod\ 
College 

Dean of the College 

[ARY MARGARE1 RALSTON, A.B., Florida State University; 
M.S.W., Tulane Universit) 

Assistant Professor o\ Sociology 

IRGINIA RAMSEY, A.B., Vanderbilt University; MAT., Emory 
Universit\ 

Assistant Professor of English 

[OCELYN S. RE1TER, B. Mus., Eastman School of Music; M. Mus., 
University ot Nebraska 

Instructor in Applied Music (Voice) 

AUL E. ROBBINS, B.S., University ot Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Georgia 
Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

AMES T. ROGERS, B.S., Delta State College; Ed. D„ Florida State 
University 

Dean of Student Affairs 

■ 

SOL RUNDBAKEX, B.F.A., M.Ed., University of Georgia; Ph D., 
Michigan State University 

Assistant Professor of Education 

ANDREW J. RYAN, III, LL.B., Mercer University 
Instructor in Police Administration 

YLVIA ANN SANDERS, B.S., University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Pltysical Education 

,'E1L B. SATTERFIELD, A.B., University of North Carolina; M.S.S.W., 
University of Tennessee 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

OHN L. SAUNDERS, B.A., University of Arkansas; M.S., M.A., Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

GARY W. SCHLEGEL, B.A., DePauw University; M.B.A., Northwes- 
tern University 

Instructor iti Business Administration 

EA LESLIE SEALE, B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.A., 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Professor of English 

\MES L. SEMMES, B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.S., Florida 
State University 

Assistant Professor of MatJiematics 

3E C. SHEFFIELD, B.S. Ed., M. Ed., Georgia Southern College 
Assistant Professor of Matliematics 

VIARK M. SILVERS, JR., B.B.A., J.D., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 

17 



•ALEXANDER A. SIMON, JR., B.S., Georgia Institute of Technolog 
M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Instructor in Business Administration 

ROY J. SIMS, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., University of Te 
nessee 

Head, Department of Physical Education 
Professor of Physical Education 

KAREN ALICE SMITH, B.A., Sam Houston State College 
Acting Acquisitions and Serials Librarian 

CHARLES E. SNELLGROVE, JR., B.A., Florida Southern Colleg 
M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

HARRY H. SQUIRES, B.S. B.A., M.A., University of Florida 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 

JULE R. STANFIELD, A.A., Armstrong State College 

Comptroller 

* RONALD STOFFEL, A.B., San Francisco State College; M. Mus., Ui 
versity of Illinois. 

Conductor, Savannah Symphony Orchestra 
Instructor in Music 

WILLIAM W. STOKES, B.A. Ed., M. Ed., Ed. D„ University of Flori< 
Head, Department of Education 
Professor of Education 

CEDR1C STRATTON, B.Sc, Nottingham University, England; Ph.I 
Birkbeck College, London, England 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

ROBERT I. STROZ1ER, A.B., University of Georgia; M.A, Ph.I 
Florida State University 

Professor of English 

MR. JOHN SUCHOWER, B.A., Fairfield University; M.A., Universi 
of Detroit 

Assistant Professor of English and Speech 
Director of the "Masquers" 

CAROL HELEN SUTTON, B.S.N. , University of South Carolina 

Instructor in Nursing 

RUTH E. SWINSON, B.S. in Ed., Georgia Southern College; MA. ; 
Library Science, George Peabody College of Teachers 
Assistant Professor 
Reference Librarian 

**LAWRENCE M. TAPP, B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

DOROTHY M. THOMPSON, A.B., Monmouth College; MA., Nort 
western University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work, Westei 
Reserve University 

Professor of Psychology 

FRANCIS M. THORNE, III, B.S., Stetson University; Ph.D., Universi 
of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Biology 

18 



• • \l \r\ C. I OR! \\. B.S., I ennessee A and I Stati University; M. 
lil.. Wayne State University; Ed.D., Vw ^ < >i k University. 
Chairman , Division o\ Business Administration, 
Savannah state College 
l DWARD FRANKLIN WALLS. JR., \ ,B., Oglethorpe University; M. 
Ed., liti(»i\ University 

Instructor in Business Administration 
All. 1-. WARD. lis.. Georgia reachers College; M. Ed., Ed 1)., Uni- 
versity oi Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences 
FREDERICK G. WE1SER, B.M., Eastman School of Music; Solo Clari- 
net. Savannah Symphony Orchestra 

Instructor in Applied Music (Clarinet) 
N HARVEY Will/. B.B.A., LL.B., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Business Administration 
OHN A. WELSH, 111, A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity 

Assistant Professor of English 
JHARLES C. WHITE, B.S., East Carolina College; M.A., Southern 
Illinois University 

Assistant Professor of English 
A r lLLIAM S. WINN, B.D., A.B., Emory University; M.A., University 
of North Carolina 

Professor of Mathematics 

XARKE S. WORTHINGTON, B.A., University of Arizona; ALA., 

Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., Emory University 

Head, Department of Psychology 

Professor of Psychology 

t. C. WU, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Professor of History and Political Science 
IEGINA M. YOAST, B.A., Texas Christian University; B.S. in Library 
Science, Columbia University 

Associate Professor 
Head Librarian 



Part-time Instructor 
*On leave of absence 
••Courtesy Appointment 

ARMSTRONG COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Hie Commission controls certain endowment and scholarship funds. 
DR. IRVING VICTOR, Chairman 
MR. EDWARD BARTLETT 
MRS. ARCHIE HERMAN 
MR. JOHN A. PETERS, JR. 
MR. JOHN RANITZ, JR. 
MR. HARRY SWICORD 
Ex-Officio 

DR. THORD MARSHALL 

ROBERT F. LOVETT, The Honorable 

J. CURTIS LEWIS, JR., The Honorable 

MR. ANDREW P. CALHOUN 

MR. RICHARD FRANKLIN 



19 



II. Purposes and Programs 






It is the purpose ol Armstrong State College to furnish students 
with a basic understanding of the intellectual structure of civilized 
life and to provide some of the knowledge and experience necessary to 
enable them to become responsible contributors to their civilization. 

The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees and the core 
curriculum of all programs are directed primarily toward the develop- 
ment of attitudes and habits of mind leading toward intellectual and 
emotional maturity of the individual while providing a foundation of 
knowledge with orientation for future learning. Fundamental con- 
cepts of natural phenomena and their interactions are provided by 
study in the physical and biological sciences. The behavior of man 
is explored in the social sciences. The humanities deal with man's 
experience of life in nature and society through the study of his mental 
and spiritual creations: language, art, history, philosophy, and religion. 

In addition to these programs, the complex professional resources 
of the college make it the center of professional programs, such as those 
in elementary and secondary education, business administration, nursing, 
dental hygiene, and police administration, which require a sound aca- 
demic training as well as the development of professional skills. 

No college degree program can provide the total education of an 
individual; all persons must continue to learn throughout their lives 
or suffer intellectual atrophy. The college, therefore, also becomes the 
natural center for the creation of numerous programs, often through 
short non-credit courses and institutes, which apply the college's re- 
sources to the many problems arising in a large urban community 
and to satisfying the desire of its citizens for continuing education. In 
this sense the educational role of this college is truly multi-purpose. 



FOUR-YEAR DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of history, English, music, political 
science, and psychology. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chemistry, and mathe- 
matics. 

Bachelor of Business Administration in the fields of accounting, 
management-marketing, economics, and finance. 

(Each of these above degrees may be taken along with an approved 
program leading to certification for secondary school teaching.) 

Bachelor of Science in Education — Speech Correction 

20 



Bachelor oi Science in Elemental*) Education, 
Bachelor oi Science in Medical rechnology. 
Bacheloi oi Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

I WO-YEAR DEGREES 

IIr- following two-yeai degrees are offered as preparation for high- 
i degrees in the Liberal arts and professions and foi positions in business: 

Associate in Arts 

.Associate in Arts in Nursing 

(This degree prepares graduates for the state exami- 
nation for licensure as registered nurses.) 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 

Associate in Arts in Police Administration 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Armstrong State College offers the first year of programs in forestry 
tad veterinary medicine; the first two years of programs in engineering, 
ndustrial management, physical education, physics, pharmacy; the first 
;hree years, or the entire pre-professional programs, in dentistry, law, 
nedicine, optometry, and other fields. The student planning to trans- 
fer from Armstrong State College into a professional or academic major 
program not offered here should, at the beginning of his freshman 
/ear, consult the catalog requirements of the school he plans to attend. 

HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

Armstrong State College was founded on May 27, 1935, as Arm- 
itrong Junior College, by the Mayor and Alderman of the City of Sa- 
vannah to meet a long felt need for a college in the community. The 
College was housed in the Armstrong Building, a gift to the city from 
the family of George F. Armstrong, and over the years built or acquired 
five more buildings in the neighborhood of Forsyth Park and Monterey 
Square. 

The College, as Armstrong College of Savannah, became a two- 
year unit of the University System of Georgia on January 1, 1959, under 
the control of the Regents of the University System. 

In 1962, the Mills Bee Lane Foundation purchased a new campus 
site of over 200 acres, selected by the Regents. The new campus, with 
seven new buildings, was occupied in December, 1965. 

21 






In 1964, the Regents conferred upon Armstrong the status of a 
four-year college, with the right to offer the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration. 
The College now oilers sixteen major programs leading to these 
degrees, and, in addition, the two-year .Associate Degree in Nursing, in 
Dental Hygiene, and in Police Administration. 

The College community includes approximately 2,200 studtnts and 
90 full-time faculty members. 

Armstrong State College was fully accredited as a senior institu- 
tion by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in December, 
1968, with accreditation retroactive to January 1, 1968. 



LIBRARY 

The Lane Library is housed in an attractive two-story building, 
centrally located near classrooms and the student center. The library is 
well lighted, air conditioned, fully carpeted and handsomely furnished.! 
Reading rooms and individual carrel desks are available on both floors. 
Faculty carrels and group study rooms are available on the second floor. 

The resources of the Library include approximately 60,000 books, 
numerous documents and pamphlets, and a collection of micro-forms 
and recordings. Over 500 periodicals and newspapers are received. 

Services and regulations are specified in the library handbook, avail- 
able on request to the Librarian of the college. 



OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

Short Courses, ]Vorksliops and Seminars are planned, organized 
and administered by the office in response to group interest, or to meet 
a community need brought to the attention of the Associate Dean for 
Community Services. All are offered on a non-credit basis and, except 
in a very few cases, there are no special requirements or prerequisites 
for admission. Brochure ol the non-credit and credit courses, under the 
heading of "Schedule oi Evening Classes" is mailed before the beginning 
of every quarter; anyone wishing to do so may have his name placed on 
this mailing list. Subjects covered vary widely; the series is designed 
to offer something to appeal to almost any adidt taste, from Computer 
Programming to Interior Decoration. The Dean is always glad to ar- 
range courses for candidates preparing to take professional examinations 
in engineering, insurance, real estate, and in other areas; the college has 
been approved as an Examination Center for a number of these ex- 
aminations. One-day workshops, such as the annual Writers' Workshop, 
are also planned and managed by this office. 

22 



K\ IX IXC. CLASSES 

In addition to the lull daytime ichedule, Armstrong offers .1 iched* 
U- ot classes in the evening, including mosi <>l the required courses 
some programs leading towards .1 degree. 



iM 



Students employed during the da) must limit then enrollment to 
>ne or two courses each quarter. 



INDUSTRIAL CO-OP PROGRAM 

li is possible, in some cases, for a student to plan, with the head 
>f his major department, a schedule that allows alternate quarters of 
ull-time work in industry or business and full-time college study in a 
legree program. Interested students should, after discussion with their 
lepartment heads, inquire concerning placement possibilities with the 
Placement Office under the Associate Dean for Community Services. 



STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM 
WITH SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

A student enrolled at Savannah State College or at Armstrong 
^tate College as a full-time student has the privilege of taking at least 
me course with his Dean's approval at the other college without paying 
in additional fee. A student, for instance, may take two courses in his 
riome college paying full lees and one course at the other college, which 
would be transferred back to his home college, or a student with at least 
1 "B" average in the preceding quarter may take three courses at his 
aome college, paying full fees, and register at the other college for an 
additional course without additional cost. 



A student may obtain in the Registrar's Office the proper form for 
permission to register for courses at Savannah State College. 




23 



III. Admission to the College 

Application forms for admission to Armstrong State College are 
provided by the Admissions Officer upon request. An application can- 
not be considered until all required forms are properly executed and 
returned to the Admissions Office. Applications must be on file in the 
Admissions Office at least twenty days before the opening of the quar- 
ter in which the applicant wishes to enter. Deadlines for submitting 
applications for the 1970-71 session are: 

For Summer Quarter, 1970 — May 22 (New freshmen and 

transfers) 

June 5 (Transient students — 
Summer only) 

For Fall Quarter, 1970 —September 2 

For Winter Quarter, 1971 — December 14 

For Spring Quarter, 1971 — March 1 

For Summer Quarter, 1971 — May 26 (New freshmen and 

transfers) 

— June 4 (Transient students — 
Summer only) 

For Fall Quarter, 1971 — September 1 






The applicant must be at least sixteen years old on or before 
registration date and must give evidence of good moral character, prom- 
ise of growth and development, seriousness of purpose, and a sense of 
social responsibility. Armstrong State College reserves the right to ex- 
amine and appraise the character, the personality, and the physical fit- 
ness of the applicant. The College further reserves the right to ex- 
amine any applicant by the use of psychological, achievement, and apti- 
tude tests and to require additional biographical data and an interview 
before the applicant is accepted or rejected. If an interview is required 
the applicant will be notified. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to refuse to accept 
any or all of the credits from any high school or other institution, 
notwithstanding its accredited status, when the College determines 
through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at 
such high school or other institution is for any reason deficient or unsat- 
isfactory. The judgment of the College on this question shall be final. 

The Admissions Officer may refer any applicant to the Admissions 
Committee of the College for study and advice. The ultimate decision 



24 






.is to whethei an applicanl shall be accepted oi rejected shall be made 
by the Admissions Officei subject to the applicant's right oi appeal as 
provided in the policies ol the Board oi Regents <>l the University Sys- 
tem. 

On the basis ol hi^ achievement as reflected by his high school 
grades and on his potential ability as shown l»\ his scores on the Scho- 
lastic Aptitude Test, an evaluation <>l each applicant's readiness to 
undertake college work will be made. 

The Admissions Office! shall, as promptly as practicable, inform 
the applicant of the action taken upon his application. 

The College reserves the right to terminate acceptance of applica- 
tions when enrollment capacity is reached. The College further re- 
sen es the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of the State 
of Georgia. 

All students enrolled at Armstrong State College are required to 
sign the Honor Pledge at the time of their initial registration. For a 
detailed explanation of the Honor System see the REGULATIONS 
section of this catalogue. 

Specific requirements for admission are discussed below. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMAN APPLICANTS 

1. a. Certificate of graduation from an accredited high school. 
A transcript of the applicant's high school record must be submitted by 
the high school directly to the College and must show credit for a mini- 
mum of sixteen units, including the following specific subjects: 

English — 4 units 

Mathematics — 2 units (One unit must be in algebra, 
although two units of algebra are desirable. For 
students entering the engineering or scientific 
fields, two units of algebra and one of geometry 
are needed.) 

Science — 2 units 

Social Studies — 2 units 

Other units sufficient to graduate. 

OR b. Successful completion of the General Educational Devel- 
opment Test (GED) with no score less than 45. A score report form 
must be submitted directly to the college by the United States Armed 
Forces Institute, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (if the student took the 
test while in military service) or from the GED testing center where 
the student took the test. A student under twenty years of age who pre- 
sents GED test scores must, in addition, (1) have a transcript of his 
high school record mailed from the high school directly to the College 

25 



and (2) obtain a recommendation from the principal of the last high 
school attended on a form provided upon request by the Admissions 
Office. 

2. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. Official results of this test must 
be filed with the Admissions Office by the final date for submitting 
application for the quarter in which the student wishes to enroll. 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test is given in all states and numerous 
foreign countries in November. December, January, March, May, and 
July. Students wishing to make application to take the test may secure 
application forms from their secondary school principal or counselor, or 
by writing directly to the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 
592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or Box 1025, Berkeley, California 
94701, for an application form and the Bulletin of Information which 
is available without charge. Applicants who wish to enroll at the be- 
ginning of the Winter Quarter should take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
in November. 

3. Application fee of S10 which must accompany the application 
form. This fee does not bind Armstrong State College to admit the 
applicant nor does it indicate acceptance of the applicant's qualifications. 
The fee will not be credited toward the matriculation fee in the event 
that the applicant is accepted as a student and it will not be refunded 
in the event that the applicant does not enroll as a student. An appli- 
cent who fails to enroll in the quarter for which he is accepted must re- 
apply for admission if he wishes to enter the institution at a later time 
by resubmission of fee by the date specified. 

4. Emergence Surgery or Medication Permit signed by the par- 
ents of a student (or the student himself if over 21 years of age) must 
be returned prior to admission either authorizing or not authorizing 
the College to take whatever action is deemed necessary in the case of an 
emergency until the parents can be reached. 

5. Physical examinations prior to admission are required for all 
entering students with the exception of the following: evening students 
special students, transient students, and auditors. 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Armstrong State College gives advanced placement, or in some 
cases college credit, for college level high school courses, on the basi; 
of the high school teacher's recommendation, the student's grade on th< 
Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB, and approval by the 
appropriate department head ol Armstrong State College. 

26 



QU \RI ER ON-TRIAL 

\ Georgia applicant foi admission to the freshman t Kiss who has 
iot previously attended any other college and whose predicted first- 
fear-average grade does not qualify him for regulai admission may be 
idmitted to the Quarter-On-Trial Program. 

\ student admitted to the Quarter-On-Trial Program must enroll 
n the appropriate freshman English course; and with the recommenda- 
tion of his facult) advisor, he m a\ enroll for as many as two additional 
uademie courses. 1»\ satisfactorily completing the appropriate English 
omse and by meeting the grade-point-average requirements specified 
n t lu- table on page BO, a Quarter-On-Trial student may qualify for 
ontinuation in the next quarter as a regular student. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER APPLICANTS 

1. Transfer applicants will follow the same procedures as fresh- 
nan applicants, except that transfer applicants who will have achieved 
iophomorc standing at the time of their entrance will not be required 
o submit their high school records. Such records may be required by 

the Admissions Office but normally the transcripts of previous college 
records will suffice in place of the high school record. A transfer appli- 
cant must ask the Registrar of each college he has previously attended 
to mail an official transcript of his record to the Admissions Office at 
Armstrong State College, regardless of the transferability of the credits. 

2. Transfer applicants with less than sophomore standing (less 
than 45 quarter hours completed) must meet entrance requirements of 
both freshman and transfer applicants and will be required to submit 
their high school records as well as transcripts of college records. 

3. A transfer applicant will not be eligible for admission to 
Armstrong State College unless he is eligible to return to the last col- 
lege attended on the date he expects to enter Armstrong. A student 
who is on suspension from another college because of poor scholarship 
or disciplinary reasons will not be eligible for admission. 

■1. A transfer applicant will be considered for admission to Arm- 
strong State College if, on all work attempted at other institutions, his 
academic performance as shown by his grade point average is equivalent 
to the minimum standard required by Armstrong State College stu- 
dents of comparable standing. (See chart under Academic Probation 
and Dismissal Policy on page 60.) 

5. Credit will be given for transfer work in which the student 
received a grade of "D" or above with the percentage of "D" grades not 
to exceed twenty (20) per cent of the total hours being transferred. 
College credit will not be allowed for such courses as remedial English 
and remedial mathematics or courses basically of secondary school level. 

27 



6. Credits earned at an institution which is not a member of 
the appropriate regional accrediting agency can be accepted on a pro- 
visional basis only. A student transferring from an institution which 
is not a member of a regional accrediting agency must achieve a "G" 
average on his first fifteen quarter hours of work at Armstrong in order 
to be eligible to continue. In certain areas he may be required to vali- 
date credits by examination. In computing cumulative grade averages, 
only the work attempted at Armstrong will be considered. 

7. The amount of credit that Armstrong will allow for work 
done in another institution within a given period of time may not ex- 
ceed the normal amount of credit that could have been earned at 
Armstrong during that time. A maximum of 100 quarter hours may be 
transferred from a junior college. For a bachelor's degree, 90 quarter 
hours of junior and senior level work will be required (except in cer 
tain approved programs in mathematics, the natural sciences, and 
music) , of which the last 45 quarter hours in courses numbered 200 
and above must be taken at Armstrong. At least half of the courses 
offered in the major field must be taken at Armstrong. 

8. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a 
degree may be taken by correspondence or extension courses. No corre- 
spondence courses may be used to meet requirements in the majoi 
field or the related field for the bachelor's degree. No correspondence 
courses may be taken while a student is enrolled at Armstrong State 
College without prior approval of the Dean of the College and the head 
of the department in which the student is majoring. Correspondence 
credit will not be accepted for courses in English composition or foreigr 
language. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION STUDENTS 
All military personnel and adults, age 22 years or older, who wisl 
to take regularly scheduled courses tor personal enrichment and othei 
non-degree objectives may be enrolled for credit or as auditors. If these 
students enroll lor credit, they must meet all prerequisites for the cours* 
involved; if they enroll as auditors, they must have the permission of th< 
instructor involved. Admission of Continuing Education students re 
quires: (1) evidence of high school graduation or possession of GET 
certificate or (2) transcript from last college attended. Students on pro 
bation or suspension will not be permitted to enroll in this progran 
without approval by the Admissions Committee. 

A maximum of 15 quarter hours credit may be earned by student 
enrolled in this classification. Should a degree become the objective o 
a Continuing Education student, he must apply for admission as i 
degree candidate, meeting regular admission requirements. 

All college lees apply to students in this classification with the ex 
ception of the application fee which is not required until the studen 
requests admission as a degree candidate. Military personnel pay fee 
in accordance with negotiated military contracts. 

28 



READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

\ student who has not been enrolled al Armstrong foi one or 
lore quarters musi appl) foi readmission on a form provided by the 
Ldmissions Office. A former student who has not attended another 
ollege since leaving Armstrong ma) be readmitted provided he is not 
n suspension .it the time he wishes to reenter. A formei student who 
.ts attended another college since Leaving Armstrong must meet rc- 
juirements for readmission as a transfei student or .is a transient stu- 
lent, whichever is applicable. \ student who is readmitted after an 
bsence from the College for more than two years must meet degree 
equirements as listed in the catalogue in effect at the time of his re- 
urn. 

TRANSIENT STUDENTS 

I tansient student status means that a student is admitted to Arm- 
Itrong State College only for a specified period of time, normally a 
ummer quarter. An applicant for transient status must file a regular 
pplication form and submit a statement from his Dean or Registrar 
hat he is in good standing and has permission to take specific courses 
i Armstrong to be transferred to his own institution when satisfactorily 
ompleted. Since transient students are not admitted as regular Arm- 
trong students, transcripts of college work completed elsewhere are not 
isually required of such applicants. A transient student who wishes to 
emain at Armstrong longer than one quarter must submit an addi- 
ional statement from his Dean or Registrar or he must meet all re- 
juirements for regular admission as transfer student. 

ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE ACCELERATED 
PROGRAM FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 

This program marks a new venture for this community in which 
ollege and high school join to challenge intellectually able young men 
nd women to test their interests and their capacity to learn. 

The Program 

High school students who have completed the eleventh grade, who 
tave met the criteria for admission to the program and who maintain 
ts standards will be permitted to enroll in one course each quarter at 
Vrmstrong State College while they complete the senior year of high 
chool. Upon graduation from high school, these students will be 
dmitted upon application as regular students of the College and will 
>e given full college credit for the courses taken at Armstrong. 

Through this program, a student may complete over two-thirds of 
he freshman year of college before he begins his regular college career. 

The maximum number ol college courses possible is: 

29 



Summer 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Fall 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Winter 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Spring 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Summer (following high 
school graduation and 

admission to Armstrong) ... 3 courses (15 qtr. hours) 

7 courses (35 qtr. hours) 

Every student accepted in this program must take a course ir 
English or mathematics first. Thereafter, he ma) choose any freshmai 
course, with permission of his college adviser. 

Criteria for Admission 

The College will consider a student for this program only upoi 
written recommendation of his high school principal. In the viev 
of the College, it is only the principal who can judge the circumstance 
that may make the program valuable and practicable for any student. 

To be admitted to the program a student must satisfy all o 
these criteria: 

1. written recommendation by the Principal of the high school 

2. completion of the eleventh grade in an accredited high school 

3. a combined verbal and math score of 1000 on CEEB tests; 

4. an average grade of B or better in academic subjects (Englisl 
mathematics, science, social studies, language) through th 
ninth, tenth and eleventh grades as averaged by the Am 
strong State College Admissions Officer. 

5. written permission of the parents. 

Standards 

A student forfeits the privilege of this program if in any quart* 
his grade in the college course is below C or his high school average i 
academic courses is below B. 

Procedure for Admission 
A high school principal may recommend students following tl 
30 



fth six-week period ol the students' eleventh year, ["he recommenda- 
ion to the College musi be made !>\ Ma) 15th il the student intends 

in in the summer. I he principal ma) recommend follow 
lie udl eleventh year by August 15th il the student intends to begin in 

be tall. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

\ student from .i country other than t he United States who is 
iterested in attending Armstrong must meet the following require- 
lents before application is made: 

1. He must have met the requirements of freshman applicants. 

2. He must have an official transcript of his academic record 
mailed to the Admissions Office at Armstrong with an official 
translation. 

3. He must take the SAT of the College Entrance Examination 
Board in the testing center nearest his home and ask that the 
results be sent to Armstrong. 

4. He must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language and 
ask that the results be sent to Armstrong. (Applications for 
the test are available from the Educational Testing Service, 

CD ' 

Box 899, Princeton, V J. 08540.) 

If the applicant meets the academic requirements for admission, 
ie will be sent an application form. After it has been returned and ap- 
proved, the applicant will be sent an 1-20 Form (1-20A and I-20B) , 
vhich he can then take to the American Consul to ask for a student 
isa. When he arrives on campus, he will be tested in English composition 
»\ the Department of English for class placement. 

Xo scholarships are available for students who are not legal resi- 
dents of Georgia. All foreign students must pay non-resident fees. 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and upon 
eceipt of Certification of Eligibility and Fntitlement from the Veterans 
administration, veterans may attend under Public Law 358 (Veterans 
veadjustment Benefits Act of 1966), Public Law 815 (disabled). Public 
.aw 891 (disabled), Public Law 631 (war orphans), or Public Law 301 
children of permanently disabled veterans; . Students under Public 
,aws 358, 361, or 63 1 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at the 
ime of registration. 

31 



APPLICANTS SPONSORED BY VOCATIONAL 

REHABILITATION 
Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other 
community agencies must apply at least six (6) weeks before the begin- 
ning of any quarter to insure proper processing oi applications. 

FINANCIAL AID 

(See Financial Aids, Section V of this Bulletin for further infor- | 
mation.) 

REGISTRATION AND ORIENTATION 

Prior to the Fall Quarter a period of orientation is set aside to 
assist new students in becoming acquainted with the College, its curri- 
culum, extra-curricular activities, student leaders, counselors, members 
of the facultv and the administration. Complete instructions concern- 
ing registration are made available to all students at the beginning of 
the registration period. Registration includes counseling, academic 
advisement, selection of courses, enrollment in classes, and payment of 
fees. Fidl details regarding orientation and registration are provided 
to all incoming students during the summer preceding their initial en- 
rollment. 

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS OF THE BOARD 
OF REGENTS 
To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must 
establish the following facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar. 

1. A student who is under 21 years of age at the time he seeks 
to register or re-register at the beginning of any quarter will 
be accepted as a resident student only upon a showing by 
him that his supporting parent or guardian has been legally 
domiciled in Georgia for a period of at least twelve months 
immediately preceding the date of registration or re-registra- 
tion. 

2. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as 
guardian of a non-resident minor, such minor will not be 
permitted to register as a resident student until the expiration 
of one year from the date of appointment, and then only upon 

32 



J 



proper showing thai Mich appointment was not made t<> avoid 
payment of the non-resideni fee. 

If a student is over 21 years of age, lie ma} registei .is .1 
dent student <>nl\ upon .1 showing thai he has been domiciled 
in Georgia for ai le.ist twelve months prior to the registra- 
tion date. 

\n\ period of time during which a person is enrolled 
.is .1 student in ;m\ educational institution in Georgia ma) 
not be counted .is .1 part of the twelve months' domicile and 
residence herein required when it appears that the student 
came into the State and remained in the State for the pri- 
mary purpose of attending a school or college. 

A full-time faculty member of the University System, his or 
her spouse, and minor children may register on the payment 
of resident fees, even though the faculty member has not 
been a resident in Georgia for twelve months. 

If the parents or legal guardian of a minor change residence 
to another state following a period of residence in Georgia, 
the minor may continue to take courses for a j>eriod of 
twelve consecutive months on the payment of resident fees. 
After the expiration of the twelve months' period the stu- 
dent may continue his registration only upon the payment 
of fees at the non-resident rate. 

Military personnel and their dependents may become eligible 
to enroll in institutions of the University System as resident 
students provided thev file with the institution in which they 

wish to enroll the following: 

a. A statement from the appropriate military official show- 
ing that the applicant's "home of record" is the State 
of Georgia; and 

b. Evidence that applicant is registered to vote in Georgia; 
or 

c. Evidence that applicant, if under 18 years of age, is the 
child of parents who are registered to vote in Georgia: 
and 

33 



d. Evidence that applicant or his supporting parent or 
guardian filed a Georgia State income tax return during 
the preceding year. 

7. Foreign students who attend institutions of the University 
System under sponsorship of civic or religious groups located 
in this state, may be enrolled upon the payment of resident 
fees, provided the number of such foreign students in any 
one institution does not exceed the quota approved by the 
Board of Regents for that institution. 

8. All aliens shall be classified as non-resident students; pro 
vided, however, that an alien who is living in this count!) 
under a visa permiting permanent residence or who has filed 
with the proper federal immigration authorities a Declara 
tion of Intention to become a citizen of the United States 
shall have the same privilege of qualifying for resident statu; 
for fee purposes as has a citizen of the United States. 

9. Teachers in the public schools of Georgia and their depend 

ents may enroll as students in University System institution: 
on payment of resident fees, when it appears that sue! 
teachers have resided in Georgia for nine months, that the) 
were engaged in teaching during such nine months' period 
and that they have been employed to teach in Georgia dur 
ing the ensuing school year. 

10. If a woman who is a resident of Georgia and who is a stu 
dent in an institution of the University System marries ; 
non-resident of the State, she may continue to be eligible t< 
attend the institution on payment of resident fees, provide* 
that her enrollment is continuous. 

11. If a woman who is a non-resident of Georgia marries a mai 
who is a resident of Georgia, she will not be eligible to regis 
ter as a resident student in a University System institutioi 
until she has been domiciled in the State of Georgia for 
period of twelve months immediately preceding the date c 
registration. 



34 



\dmission to the Associate in 
\rts Degree in Nursing 



PROGRAM IN NURSING 

Nursing calls for a variety "I skills and aptitudes and oilers un- 
mited opportunities for different kinds ol service. Therefore, a 
andidate lor the nursing program should have good physical and 
tental health as well as those personal qualifications appropriate for 
in sing. For these reasons the Admissions Committee selects students 
hose abilities, interests, and personal qualities show promise of suc- 
ess in the program and in the field of nursing. Factors influencing 
ie decision ol the Admissions Committee are: achievement as shown 
•n the secondary school record, ability as measured by the Scholastic 
Lptitude Test, motivation lor nursing, health, personal qualities, and 
3cial adjustment. Applicants who, in the judgment of the Admissions 
Committee, present high overall qualifications are selected. Since ap- 
plications are processed as received, applicants are encouraged to apply 
art) in the senior year of high school or as early in the year preceding 
idmission as possible. Application forms are available from the Ad- 
nissions Officer of the College. 

The preferred age for applicants, married or single, at the time 
>f entrance is 18. The upper age limit is 40 years. Applicants who 
lave not reached their 18th birthday but who can show evidence that 
hey will reach their 20th birthday by the date they are scheduled to 
omplete the program will be considered. The State of Georgia re- 
hires, as do most other states, United States citizenship, either natural 
torn or naturalized, for registered nurse licensure. Candidates for ad- 
nission to the nursing program who are not citizens may be admitted 
>nly under certain circumstances and should make individual inquiries. 



How to Apply 

1. Complete the application form for admission to Armstrong 
State College and return it with the non-refundable S10 ap- 
plication fee. Mark the application For Nursi?ig Only. 

2. Complete the Personal Data Sheet for the Department of 
Nursing. 

3. Have the medical form completed by a licensed physician. 

4. Have the dental form completed by a dentist. 

35 



5. Take the National League for Nursing Aptitude Test on one 
of the dates scheduled on campus. Applications for the Na- 
tional League for Nursing Aptitude Test may be obtained 
from the Department of Nursing at Armstrong State College 
or from the Director or Admissions at Armstrong State Col- 
lege. 

6. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College En- 
trance Examination Board as early in the year as possible. 
When applying for the test, be certain to list Armstrong State 
College as one college to receive your scores. 

7. Have a transcript of your high school record mailed from the 
high school directly to the Admissions Office at Armstrong. 

(A transfer student should also ask the Registrar of each 
school or college she/he has previously attended to mail an 
official transcript of her/his record to the Admissions Office 
at Armstrong, regardless of the transferability of the credits.) 

8. Send, or have sent, two written letters of reference directly 
to the Admissions Office from non-family members (teachers, 
employers, or other qualified persons) who have known you 
for at least three years. 

9. Send, or have sent, to the Admissions Office a certified copy 
of your birth certificate. 



OTHER INFORMATION 

1. It is recommended that applicants who have been away from 
school for a considerable period of time enroll in at least 
one course in an accredited college of their choice during 
the school year or summer preceding their planned entrance 
to the nursing program. 

2. Except in unusual circumstances, no credit will be given for 
nursing courses taken in another school of nursing. 

3. An applicant on academic suspension or probation from 
another college will not be considered. 

4. Nursing students are responsible for providing their owr 
transportation to and from campus to the clinical area, (i.e 
community hospitals and other health agencies) . 



36 



5. Armstrong State College does not provide student housing. 
It is necessary for the students whose homes are not Located 
in Savannah to make private arrangements for living accom- 
modations, rhe responsibility Eoi procuring suitable hous- 
ing rests with the student and hei his parents. For further 
information regarding housing, please contact the office oi 
Student Affairs. 

6. Student* are required to wear the official student uniform 
of the Department of Nursing. Uniforms will be ordered 
during the Winter Quarter and ma) be purchased from the 
College Bookstore. 

7. Fees for a nursing student will l>e the same as for any other 
student at Armstrong. Please refer to the Fees section of the 
current Bulletin. 

8. Students are admitted to the nursing sequence courses once 
each year in the fall. Seven consecutive quarters in the 
nursing program are required. Students may begin the aca- 
demic courses required in the program in any quarter. 

9. All nursing courses must be taken in sequence. Each nurs- 
ing course has a prerequisite beginning with Fundamentals 
of Nursing. 

10. All students must take the National League for Nursing 
Pre-Nursing Aptitude and Guidance Examination. 

11. Students accepted for the nursing program will be sent in- 
formation on supplies and equipment needed for the Fall 
Quarter approximately two weeks before the opening of 
school with approximate charges. 

12. Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way 
guarantee formal admission into the Department of Nursing. 

Formal admission and continuation in the second quarter 
of the program is dependent upon a student's obtaining a pass- 
ing grade of "C" in nursing and maintaining an overall 2.0 
average first quarter. 

37 



Admission to the Associate in 
Science Degree in Dental Hygiene 

The profession of Dental Hygiene is an ideal career for young 
women interested in science and health services. The growing and 
constant demand for graduate dental hygienists assures a young wom- 
an of regular hours and good compensation. 

A dental hygienist works under the general supervision of a den- 
tist and performs a number of dental functions. Her activities usually 
include performing oral prophylaxis (cleaning of the teeth) , instructing 
patients in dental health, taking, developing and mounting dental x-rays, 
applying fluorides and sometimes assisting the dentist in chairside and 
laboratory duties. 

There are certain personal qualifications which are essential for a 
successful dental hygienist. These are good health, neat appearance, 
high moral character, a desire to be of service to others, and the ability 
to get along well w T ith people. 

The Armstrong State College program consists of seven quarters 
of full time study (two academic years and the intervening summer). 
Applicants are matriculated once each year, in September. 

There are no definite age requirements or restrictions for the 
basic Dental Hygiene program. However, all applicants must be grad- 
uates of an accredited high school or its equivalent. Students may be 
either married or single and must be citizens of the United States, 
either natural born or naturalized. 

Applicants must meet the admission requirements for Armstrong 
State College and the School of Dental Hygiene. 

The major part of an applicant's secondary school work should be 
in the college preparatory program and should include two years 
of mathematics. Because of the heavy emphasis on science in the 
dental hygiene curriculum, it is important that applicants have a good 
foundation in chemistry and biology. The quality of the candidate's 
work in high school English and social studies is most important in 
evaluating her total qualifications for admission to the Dental Hygiene 
program. Other factors which influence the decision of the Dental 
Hygiene admissions committee are: a "C" or better average in high 
school, an acceptable score (composite — verbal and mathematical) on 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board, and an average of 4 on the Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test. 

38 



HOW I O APTLY 

Complete the application form foi admission to Armstrong 
State College and return it with the non-refundable flO ap- 
plication fee. Mark the application Foi Dental Hygiene Only, 
Complete the Personal Data Sheel foi the Department <>i 
Dental Hygiene. 

Have the medical form completed l>\ .1 physician. 
II.iw the dental form completed by .1 dentist. 
lake the Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test on one of the three 
dates scheduled on campus. Applications foi the Dental 
Hygiene Aptitude Test may be obtained from the Depart- 
ment oi Dental Hygiene at Armstrong State College or from 
the Director ol Admissions at Armstrong State College. 
Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College En- 
trance Examination Board as early in the year as possible. 
When applying for the test be certain to list Armstrong 
State College as one college to receive your scores. 
Have a transcript of your high school record mailed from the 
high school directly to the Admissions Office at Armstrong. 
(A transfer student should also ask the Registrar of each 
school or college she has previously attended to mail an 
official transcript of her record to the Admissions Office at 
Armstrong, regardless of the transferability of the credits) . 

OTHER INFORMATION 

It is recommended that applicants who have been away from 
school tor a considerable period of time enroll in at least one 
course in an accredited college of their choice during the 
school year or summer preceding their planned entrance to 
the Dental Hygiene program. 

For the Associate in Science Degree no credit will be given 
lor Dental Hygiene courses taken in another School of Dental 
Hygiene. 

An applicant on academic suspension or probation from an- 
other college will not be considered. 

Dental Hygiene students are responsible for providing their 
own transportation to and from campus and to community 
agencies when assigned for field experiences. 
Armstrong State College does not provide student housing. 
It is necessary lor the students whose homes are not located 
in Savannah to make private arrangements for living accom- 
modations. The responsibility for procuring suitable hous- 
ing rests with the student and her parents. For further in- 

39 



formation regarding housing, please contact the Office c 
Student Affairs. 

6. Students are required to wear the official student uniform c 
the Department of Dental Hygiene. Uniforms will be orders 
during the Winter Quarter and may be purchased from ■ 
College Bookstore. 

7. Fees for Dental Hygiene students will be the same as fo 
any other student at Armstrong. Please refer to the Fee 
section of the current Bulletin. 

8. Students are admitted to the Dental Hygiene sequence couse 
once each year in the fall. Seven consecutive quarters in th( 
Dental Hygiene program are required. Students may begir 
the academic courses required in the program in any quartet 

9. All Dental Hygiene clinical courses must be taken in sequence 
Each Dental Hygiene course has a prerequisite beginning witr 
Dental Hygiene 101. 

10. All students must take the Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test 
to be considered for admission. 

11. Students accepted for the Dental Hygiene program will be 
sent information on supplies and equipment needed for the 
Fall Quarter approximately two weeks before the opening 
of school with approximate charges. 

12. Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any 
way guarantee formal admission into the Department of 
Dental Hv^iene. 

Formal admission and continuation in the program for the 
second quarter is dependent upon a student's obtaining a pass- 
ing grade of "C" in dental hygiene and maintaining an over- 
all 2.0 average first quarter. 

Admission to the Associate in Arts Degree 
Program in Police Administration 

An Applicant must present: 

1. evidence of high school graduation (or equivalent) as shown 
by the high school transcript or General Educational Development credit 
(USAFI credits or credits earned through his school correspondence 
courses are not accepted) ; 

2. transcripts from all previous colleges attended; 

3. a letter of recommendation from high school principal, teach- 
er, or counselor, and letter from the chief law enforcement officer in 
his community. 

The applicant must be approved by the faculty of the Department 
of Police Administration. 



40 






[V. Fees 



APPLICATION FEE 

rhc Application Fee <>i $10.00 is paid l>\ all students at the time 
>i initial application foi admission to Armstrong State College. The 
Acceptance ol the Application Fee does noi constitute acceptance ot 

be .student, rhis fee is not refundable. 

MATRICULATION FEE 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering for the normal 
Burse load of fifteen hours is S 105.00. Students carrying less than 
12 credit hours in a quarter will pay at the rate of $9.00 per quarter 
lour in Matriculation Fees. 



OUT OF STATE TUITION 



Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $135.00 per quarter in 
iddition to all regular fees. Students carrying less than 12 credit hours 
n a quarter who are not legal residents of the State of Georgia will 
Day at the rate of §11.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee in addition 
lour in Matriculation Fees. 

STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE 

There will be a Student Activity Fee of $15.00 per quarter. This 

ee is not refundable. 

I 

LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to students register- 
ng on the date listed in the catalog as the date on which classes begin. 
V fee of $5.00 will be charged for registrations completed on the date 
isted in the catalog as the "last day to register for credit." 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE FEE 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's schedule 
ifter the registration cards have been processed. No charge is made if 
:he change is initiated by the College. This fee is not refundable. 

GRADUATION FEE 

A Graduation Fee of $10.00 will be collected from each candidate 
tor Graduation. 

41 



TRANSCRIPT FEE 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. 






MUSIC FEES 

Students who are not full-time music majors registered for 10 or 
more quarter hours will be required to pay a special fee for applied 
music courses in addition to the regular registration and matriculation 
fees. The fees are indicated in the description of courses found under 
"Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin and are not refund- 
able. 

Students who are full-time music majors and registered for 10 
or more quarter hours are not required to pay this special fee. 

MAKE-UP TEST FEE 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instructor to make up 
an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to make 
up the announced test must be made within one week after the student 
returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination and laboratory 
examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any one 
student for a final make-up examination in a given subject shall not 
exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged are as follows: the student was absent 
(1) on official college business; (2) due to illness; (3) because of 
death in the family; or (4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented in writing to the instructor. 

SHORT COURSES 

Fees are announced for each course when the course is announced. 
No refund can be made for withdrawal from a course. 

SUMMARY OF FEES 

Matriculation per quarter $105.00 

Student Activity, per quarter 15.00 

TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS 120.00 

42 



Out of State ruition, pei quartei 135.00 

TO l \l. FOR NON-RESIDEN is : 

Matriculation, Part-time Students, per quarter houi . . . 9.00 

Non-Resident ruition, Part-time Students, jk-i quarter hour 

(in addition to Matriculation Fee) 11.00 



PRIVILEGE FEES 

Application Fee $ 10.00 

Late Registration — Maximum 5.00 

Special Examinations 2.00 

Final Examinations 5.00 

Graduation Fee 10.00 

Transcript, first one free, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule 2.00 



REFUNDS 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application for 
withdrawal from school. Xo refunds will be made to students dropping 
a course. Students who formally withdraw during one week following 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 80% of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw during 
the period between one and two weeks after the scheduled registration 
date are entitled to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for that quarter. 
Students who formally withdraw between two and three weeks after 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 40 % of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw during 
the period between three and four weeks after the scheduled registration 
date are entitled to a refund of 20^,' of the fees paid for that quarter. 
Students who withdraw after a period of four weeks has elapsed from 
the scheduled registration date will be entitled to no refund of any 
part of the fees paid for that quarter. 

Fees and CJiarges are Subject to Change at the End of any Quarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the col- 
lege will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 

43 



not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until th( 
delinquency has been removed. 

i Foi each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of regis 



nation. 



11 a check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it h 
drawn, the student's registration will be cancelled and the student ma] 
re-registei onl) on payment ol a $5.00 service charge. 




44 



I. Financial Aids 



FINANCIAL AIDS 

A college education for qualified students, regardless of theii 
lomic circumstances, is the guiding principle behind Armstrong State 
College's program ol student financial aid. Through an expanding 
program of financial aid which offers scholarships, short-term loans, 
long-term loans, grants, and student employment, Armstrong State 
College tries to provide an opportunity for all qualified students with 
limited resources to attend college. 

In selecting a financial-aid recipient, special consideration is given 
to the applicant's record of achievement and promise of success as well 
as his financial need. Gift scholarships usually specify high academic 
standards as an eligibility requirement; otherwise full-time students 
in good standing who progress normally toward their degree-goal are 
eligible for financial aid. 

Armstrong State College uses the College Scholarship Service which 
evaluates the Parents' Confidential Statement. Freshmen may secure 
this form from the local high school counselor, from the Office of 
Student Affairs of the College, or from the College Scholarship Service, 
P. O. Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey. Applications which do not 
include this financial data are incomplete and cannot be considered. 
Applications for scholarships must be filed before May 1. Final action 
cannot be taken until the applicants have been accepted for admission 
to the college; thus, early application is urged. 

If a student on scholarship withdraws from school, he is obligated 
to reimburse the college for the scholarship within one quarter follow- 
ing the date of withdrawal. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

American Business Women (Azalea Chapter) 

American Business Women (Rebel Chapter) 

Armstrong State College Athletic Association 

Harry M. Carter Scholarship 

Chatham Education Association Scholarship 

Clinton Oil Company 

Colonial Oil Industries Scholarship 

Elks Aidmore Auxiliary (Nurses) 

Exchangette Club 

Fraternal Order of Police 

Garden City Lions Club Scholarship 

Great Dane Trailer Scholarships 

Robert W. Groves Scholarship 

45 



Homebuildcrs Association of Savannah 

I unci -City Methodist Church 

Junior Chamber of Commerce Scholarships 

[aycettes Scholarship 

Kennen Foundation (Piano) 

Kiwanis Academic Award 

kiwanis Athletic Award 

Arthur Lucas Memorial Scholarship 

Metropolitan Kiwanis Club of Savannah Scholarship 

National Secretaries Scholarship 

Pilot Club 

Plum rite Scholarships 

Port City Lions Club Scholarship 

Anthony Porter Scholarships 

Savannah Business and Professional Club Scholarship 

Savannah Women's Club Scholarship 

Scholarship Trust Fund Awards 

Strachan Shipping Company 

Union Camp Scholarships 



REGENTS' SCHOLARSHIPS 






Another source of scholarship aid for students who are residents 
of the State of Georgia is the Regents' Scholarship. These scholarships, 
varying from $250 to S 1,000, are awarded to superior students who are 
in need of financial assistance to attend college. To be eligible for a 
Regents' Scholarship, a student must have grades or predicted grades 
that place him in the upper 25% of his class. Recipients of Regents' 
Scholarships are expected, upon completion of their program of study, 
to reside in the State of Georgia and work one year for each $1,000 of 
scholarship aid received. 

Further information on these scholarships and application forms 
may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs at the College. The 
deadline for applying for the Regents' Scholarships is April 30. 



EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS 

Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited num- 
ber ol students with exceptional financial need who require these grants 
in order to attend college. To be eligible, the student must also show 
academic or creative promise. 

Giants will range from $200 to $1000 a year and can be no more 
than one-halt of the total assistance given the student. 

46 



NATIONAL DEFENSE si UDEN I LOANS 
High school graduates who have been accepted foi enrollment or 
students who aw already enrolled ai Armstrong State College and 
who need financial help foi educational expenses, are eligible foi 

student loans. financial need determinations air made on the basis ol 

information Included in the Parents' Confidential Statement 

The loans beai interesl at the rate ol 8 per (cut per sear. Repay- 
ment ol the principal ma) he extended ovej .1 ten-yeai period, except 
that the institution may require a repayment of no less than $15 per 
month. 

It' a borrower becomes a I nil-time teacher in an elementary or 
secondary school or in an institution ol higher education, as much as 
half of the loan may be forgiven at the rate of 10 per cent for each year 
of teaching service. 



GEORGIA HIGHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE 
CORPORATION 

The Georgia Higher Education Assistance Corporation guarantees 
educational loans made by bona fide Georgia residents. Under this 
plan, the student negotiates with approved banks, savings and loan 
associations, or insurance companies for a student loan. The loan ap- 
plication is reviewed and approved by the College. The lending institu- 
tion, with approval of the Georgia Higher Education Assistance Corpora- 
tion, makes the loan directly to the student. 

While the student remains in college, GHEAC will pay the lending 
institution seven per cent interest. Students are required to begin 
repaying student loans, and interest then accruing on such loans, ten 
months following graduation or withdrawal from school. The student 
shall be entitled to accelerate, without penalty, the payment of the 
whole or any part of a guaranteed loan. 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Through the Law Enforcement Student Loan Program and the 
Law Enforcement Student Grant Program, low-interest loans and grants 
for tuition and fees are made available to eligible students. Loans are 
made only to students who are enrolled or accepted for enrollment 
on a full-time basis in the Police Administration Program. Grants are a- 
vailable only to students who are officers of publicly-funded law enforce- 
ment agencies enrolled or accepted for enrollment on a full-time or 
part-time basis in an area related to law enforcement or an area suitable 
for those employed in law enforcement. 

47 



NURSING STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

The Nursing Student Loan Program provides financial assistance 
for nursing students in the- form of long-term, low-interest loans. Stu- 
dents enrolled in nursing schools are eligible to receive a $1,500 loan, 
or the amount o! their financial need, whichever is the lesser. A uni- 
Iomii interest rate ol three percent ]>er year will apply to student loans 
made after fune 30, 1969. Fifty percent of the loan may be forgiven 
at the rate oi 10 percent each year for full-time employment as a pro- 
onal nurse in any public or non-profit institution or agency. 

The Nursing Student Scholarship Program makes scholarships 
available to students from low-income families. 

BARNEY MINKOFF PADEREWSKI 
SCHOLARSHIP MEMORIAL FUND 

Students from Georgia enrolled in the Dental Hygiene Program 
may receive loans up to $500 per year, interest free. Repayment shall 
begin six months after the student has ceased to be enrolled as a stu- 
dent at the minimum rate of S50 per month. Applications are avail- 
able in the Office of Student Affairs. 



FINANCIAL AID APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

A financial aid applicant should take the following steps: 

1. File Armstrong State College Financial Aid Application 
Form with Director of Financial Aid, before May 1 for the 
Fall Quarter. 

2. Apply for admission to Armstrong State College through the 
Admissions Office. 

3. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College En- 
trance Examination Board no later than January of the high 
school senior year and list Armstrong as one college to re- 
ceive your scores. 

1. Have parents (or guardian) complete and submit the Parents' 

Confidential Statement to College Scholarship Service, Box 

176, Princeton, New Jersey, requesting that the Need Analysis 

Report be sent to Armstrong State College. 

When the Director of Financial Aid has received all items listed 

above, consideration will be given to the student's request. 

OTHER SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID TO 
ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

A limited number of short-term loans are available at low in- 
terest rates lot emergency purposes. 

48 






Clinton Lodcj No. 54, F. 9c A M Scholarship « This scholar- 
hij) is foi graduates ol the regulai high schools ol the Publu School 
tystem ol Chatham County. Grants will be awarded to students whose 
amih income is |7,500 oi less; who stand in the top ."•'•', ol theii 
lass; who have .1 combined SAl score ol '.mid, and who are ol 
haracter. .\ j >j >1\ to: Education Committee, Clinton Lodge No. 54, 
\ & A. M., P. o. Box ( .> ( .>_\ Savannah, Georgia, by June I. 

S01 o\io\s' l.oiM.i No. I. F. & A. M. Scholarship -- Two scholar- 
Hups for $240 ea< li to be awarded to a graduate <>l .1 tax-supported 
|gh school. \ j >p 1 \ to: Committee on Scholarship Awards, Solomon's 
Lodge No. I, F. 8c A. M., P. (). Box 1711, Savannah, Georgia. 

Savannah Chapter, National Secretaries Association — One 
scholarship covering tuition, fees and expenses, for a female student 
majoring in secretarial science. Apply 10 high school counselor or typ- 
ing teacher. 



William F. Cooper Education Find — Provides scholarships to 
female students in all fields except law, theology, and medicine (nursing 
!and medical technology are acceptable) . Apply to: Trust Department, 
Savannah Bank & Trust Company, between April 1 and May 31. 

Kennen Foundation Music Scholarships — For piano students. 
Applicants may apply for an audition prior to May 1 at Kennen Foun- 
dation Headquarters, 1451 Dale Drive, Savannah, Georgia. 

State Teachers Scholarships — Provide scholarship funds for 
residents of Georgia lor the purpose of pursuing a full academic pro- 
gram of studies leading to a professional teacher's certificate. In order 
to qualify for a State Teacher Scholarship, a student must have an 
average of B or higher. The amount of the scholarship award will 
depend on the need of the student. 

The State Scholarship Commission — Provides scholarships for 
students who cannot otherwise finance the cost of a program of study 
in dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, social work, paramedical fields and 
other educational and professional fields of study as defined and ap- 
proved by the Commission. 

Ty Cobb Education Foundation Scholarship — Provides scholar- 
ship aid for residents of the State of Georgia who have completed their 
freshman year in college. Apply to: Ty Cobb Educational Foundation 
Scholarships, Room 151, 244 Washington Street, S.W., Atlanta, Georgia 
30303. 

49 



Pl< Ki ii v Hatcher Educational Find — Provides loans at reason- 
able interest rates to students in need ol such aid to attend college. 
Apply to: Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund, P. O. Box 1238, Col- 
umbia. ( 

Savannah Pharmacei ru \i Association Scholarship — One Schol- 
arship loi $200 for a freshman student majoring in pre-pharmacy to 
attend Armstrong College (or the University of Georgia). Apply to: 
Mi. rhomas C. Crumbley, Chairman. Scholarship Committee, Savannah 
Pharmaceutical Association, c/o Crumbley's Pharmacy, 1502 Waters 
Avenue, Savannah, Georgia. 

Ch wham Artillery Scholarships — A number of scholarships for 
$250 each to members of the Chatham Artillery attending college full 
time. Apply to the Chatham Artillery. 

State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation — Students 
who have had a physical or emotional handicap, and have been treated 

isfully, and are acceptable for vocational rehabilitation, may receive 
financial assistance to attend college through the State Department of 
Vocational Rehabilitation. Apply to: 35 Abercorn Street, Savannah, 
Georgia. 



WORK-STUDY PROGRAM 

Financial aid is available to students through the Work-Study Pro- 
gram. A number of part-time jobs are made available to students who 
need financial assistance. Both the institutional application and the 
Parents" Confidential Statement are required. While school is in 
session, students may work up to three hours a day. During vacation 
periods and in the summer, it is possible for students to work full-time. 

The student's eligibility depends upon his need for employment 
to defray college expenses with prelerence given to applicants from low- 
income families. 



STUDENT ASSISTANT PROGRAM 

Work opportunities are available under the Student Assistant 
Program foi interested students. This is .i program financed by tlu 
College, and work is not necessarily assigned on the basis of financia 
need. Applications aie available in the Office of Student Affairs. 

50 






VI. Academic Regulations 

HONOR SYS 1 EM 

LThc Honoi System a( Armstrong State College provides all mem- 
ra i>i the student body with an opportunity to participate in sell 
government. The accompanying responsibilities arc outlined below. 

The Honoi System, written l>\ ;i joint committee o( faculty and 
students, received an overwhelming endorsement by both faculty and 
students during the Winter Quarter, 1965. 

The ordinances of the Honor System are as follows: 

I. All students must agree to abide by the rules and regulations 
ol the Honor System. A student shall not l)e accepted at Arm- 
strong State College unless he signs the following statement at 
the time of his first registration: 

"I have read the regulations governing the Honor System at 
Armstrong State College, and 1 understand that, as a student at 
Armstrong, I must comply with all of these requirements." This 
statement and all rules and regulations governing the Honor 
System shall be printed in the official Bulletin and the Student 
Handbook. The statement shall also be printed on the applica- 
tion form for admission to be signed by the student before admis- 
sion to the College. It will be the responsibility of the Honor 
Council to conduct an extensive orientation program at the be- 
ginning of each quarter for all newly entering students to ex- 
plain fully the requirements of the Honor System and to allow 
full discussion of these regulations. 

II. The following shall be considered violations of the Honor Code: 

A. Academic dishonesty of any kind (giving or receiving any 
unauthorized help on any assignment, test or paper. At the 
beginning of each quarter it shall be the responsibility of 
each teacher to make clear what shall be considered unauth- 
orized help in his course) . 

B. Stealing only when related to cheating. 

C. Lying before the Honor Council. 

D. Failure to report a known offense. (Lying or stealing in 
any other cases will be considered disciplinary, not Honor, 
matters.) 

III. Ways of reporting a violation of the Honor Code: 

A. Self-reporting: A student who has broken the Honor Code 
should report himself to a member of the Honor Council. 

B. Anyone (faculty member or student) who is aware of a 
violation of the Honor Code must report the matter. This 
may be done in one of two ways: 

51 



1. He may tell the person thought to be guilty to report 
himself to a member of the Honor Council no later 
than the end of the next school day. After this desig- 
nated time the person who is aware of the violation 
must inform a member of the Honor Council so that 
the Honor Council may contact the accused person if 
he has not already reported himself. 

2. He may report the suspected violation directly to a 
member ot the Honor Council without informing the 
accused. 

IV. The Honor Council will be composed of nine students. 

A. Selection shall be made by the President, Vice-President, 
and Secretary of the Student Body, the President and the Se- 
cretary of the Honor Council, together with three faculty 
members appointed by the President of the College. Selec- 
tion shall be based on the following requirements: 

1. High moral principles and unquestioned academic in- 
tegrity in all their relations to fellow students, faculty, 
and administrative officials. 

2. A minimum of C+ for the preceding quarter and an 
over-all average of C-j-. 

Any student not in good standing with the college in aca- 
demic or disciplinary matters is ineligible to serve on the 
Honor Council. Any member of the Honor Council who 
falls below these requirements will be ineligible to con- 
tinue his term of service. A replacement will not be se- 
lected, however, unless the total number of students on the 
Honor Council falls below seven. 

li. The selection committee shall submit a questionnaire to 
those students who meet these requirements. On the basis 
ol the questionnaires the committee has the power to ap- 
point three seniors, three juniors, and three sophomores to 
serve on the Honor Council. At least three committee mem- 
bers shall be women and at least three shall be men. This 
distribution may be altered when deemed best by the se- 
lection committee. The appointments shall be made by 
the second Tuesday in March, and the Council shall as- 
sume its duties on April 1. 

( The Honor Council shall elect one of its members to serve 
as President and one as Secretary. The President shall 
preside at all meetings and trials, and the Secretary shall 
maintain a written record of all proceedings. 

52 



I). During summer school, any member of the Honoi Council 
who is attending summer classes will serve on the Council 
for the summer together with othei students appointed by 
the Council and the Dean of Student Affairs. 

The Honor Council shall formulate its own bylaws and proced- 
ure. 

A. An Honor Council meeting shall be called by the President 
of the Council to examine a reported violation as soon as 
possible alter such a report. When possible, the meeting 
of the Council will be held within a week of the violation. 

B. At the meeting, the Honor Council will hear the accusation, 
the testimony of any witnesses, and any defense the accused 
may wish to present. 

C. The accused will have the right to hear all witnesses and 
all evidence brought before the Honor Council. 

D. Written notification of the specific charges which, if ap- 
proved, shall be made grounds for suspension or dismissal 
from a class. 

E. The accused will be considered innocent until proved guilty. 

F. Every trial shall be conducted by a Council of at least sev- 
en members, including the President. In the absence of the 
President, the senior justice shall preside. 

G. The Secretary will keep minutes of all meetings. All of- 
ficial testimony will be tape recorded, provided that the 
recording devices are under the control of the Council. 

H. A vote of two-thirds majority of the members of the Honor 
Council present and voting will be necessary for the con- 
viction of the accused. The Council, in the event of a ver- 
dict of guilty, shall determine the penalty by majority vote. 

I. The vote will be taken by secret ballot. 
Post-trial Procedure. 

A. Immediately upon conclusion of the trial, the accused shall 
be notified of the findings and of the recommendation that 
the Council will make to the President of the College. 

B. If the accused is found innocent, he shall be notified of the 
finding and cautioned that the trial may be re-opened for 
good cause by the Council within a period of three w T eeks 
or at the request of the professor in whose course the alleged 
violation occurred. 

55 



C. If a person is found guilty, the Honor Council will recom- 
mend to the President of Armstrong State College one of 
the following: 

1. Expulsion from the class and denial of credit in the 
course in which the violation occurred and denial of 
the position of any elective office. 

2. Suspension from school for any number of quarters 

(the minimum suspension will be for the remainder 
of the quarter in which the violation occurs.) 

3. Expulsion from school. 

In cases where the accused is found guilty, the Honor Council 
will report in writing its recommendations to the President of 
the College who will make the final decision. After the Presi- 
dent of the College has decided on the action to be taken, he 
will inform, in writing, the accused, the professor of the class in 
in which the violation occurred, and the accusor of his decision. 
The secretary of the Honor Council will then post an official 
notice on the bulletin boards announcing his action without 
mentioning the name of the accused. 

VIE Although the College feels that the above three recommenda- 
tions are appropriate for academic dishonesty, it also recognizes 
that unique circumstances may arise. For such cases, a series of 
appeals is open to the convicted student. He may appeal either 
the conviction or the punishment or both in the following ways: 

A. To the President of Armstrong State College in a letter. 

B. The President's decision may be appealed to the Chancellor 
of the University System of Georgia in a letter. 

C. The Chancellor's decision may be appealed to the Board 
of Regents of the University System of Georgia in a letter. 

VIII. Each student will be required to write on every written assign- 
ment, test, or paper a pledge that he has neither given nor re- 
ceived any unauthorized help on this work. This may be done 
by writing the word "Pledged" followed by the student's signa- 
ture. 

IX. The Honor System is dependent upon student cooperation and 
support. It is felt that every student wishes the credit for his 
work to be unquestioned and the college he has chosen to be 
respected. 

X. A revision of the Honor System will require a majority vote of 
the faculty and of the student body. 

54 



ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Ever} student who enters Armstrong State College indicates -'it the 
inic he applies for admission wha( majoi program he hopes to follow 
orward a degree, eithei .it Armstrong or al anothei college. 

II the student has not yet decided upon .1 choice foi his majoi 
>rogram. lie in.tv .mend several advising sessions during the orientation 

K'liod. In tact, it is not necessar) I01 the student in inan\ m.ijoi pro- 
grams lor the Uachcloi ol Aits degree to make a choice until the end ol 
lis sophomore year. II a student waits one 01 two years to choose a majoi 
>rogram leading to a Bachelor ol Science' degree, he will probably find 
that he must take additional courses to meet graduation requirements. 
For a student attempting to choose a major field during his first two 
years, the Office ol the Dean ol Student Affairs offers counselling and 
facultx members are happ\ to discuss aspects of their fields. 

During Orientation Week and before registration, all new enter- 
ing students, both freshmen and transfer students, will meet with the 
faculty advisor for the major program they have indicated. The advisor 
will guide them at this time in mapping out a schedule for the first 
two years. The student is then responsible for taking the courses required 
for his program, as outlined in the college Bulletin, in the proper 
sequence, during his freshman and sophomore years. If the student 
has questions concerning the courses required or the proper scheduling 
of them during these first two years, he should see the faculty advisor 
assigned by his major department to confer with students during the 
pre-advisement period scheduled in the college calendar. Since the 
student is responsible lor fulfilling the requirements of his program, 
he does not need the written approval of a faculty advisor in order to 
register for courses each quarter.* 

During the third quarter of his sophomore year, a student hoping 
to pursue a four-year major program should take to the faculty advisor 
assigned by his major department a list of the courses he has completed 
with grades. Having satisfactorily completed the requirements for the 
first two years of his major program, he will then be admitted formally 
to the third year of the major program and guided by the departmental 
adviser in maping out his curriculum for the last two years. During the 
six quarters of his junior and senior years the student must have his 
course selection approved in writing by the departmental adviser each 
quarter before registration. The proper time for this is during the pre- 
advisement period listed in the college calendar. During these last two 

•However, a student must be extremely careful to observe all regulations for ad- 
mission to courses, such as the requirement of other prerequisite courses, sometimes 
with a specified grade. Credit for a course is invalid unless all its prerequisite re- 
quirements are observed. 

55 



yean, the adviser will keep a record of the courses the student takes and 
the grades he makes, and dining the fall quarter of the senior year, 
Ihe adviser will signify to the Registrar that the student has com- 
pleted all requirements for graduation in that major program up to 
that time, and is, therefore, recommended for graduation. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT FOR STUDENTS ON 
ACADEMIC PROBATION 

A student admitted to the College on academic probation or 
placed on academic probation at the end of any quarter must confer 
with and must have his registration cards signed by the faculty adviser 
assigned In his major department. A student who has not selected a major 
will be advised by a special adviser appointed by the Dean of the 
College. 

RELATING TO DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of the 
degree program which he has chosen, in accordance with the 
] emulations of the college catalogue. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are permitted only 
with the written approval of the Dean of the College upon the 
recommendation of the department head. 

\ student will graduate under the catalogue in effect at the 
time of his admission to the college. However, after an absence 
horn Armstrong State College of two or more consecutive years, a 
student must meet the requirements of the catalogue in effect at 
die time of his return. 

1. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree 
may consist of courses taken by correspondence or extension. No 
correspondence courses may be used to meet the requirements in 
the major field or related fields for the Bachelor's degree or for 
English composition or foreign language. No corespondence courses 
may be taken while a student is enrolled, without prior approval 
ot the Dean ol the College and the head ol the department in which 
the student is majoring. 

5. 1>\ state law, one of the requirements for a diploma or certificate 
from schools supported by the State of Georgia is a demonstration 
ot proficiency in United States history and government and in 
Georgia history and government. A student at Armstrong State 
I allege may demonstrate such proficiency by passing. 

1) Political Science 113 and History 251 or History 252, 
or2) A two hour examination in United States and Georgia 
history and government. 

G. To qualify lor the baccalaureate degree, a student must earn at 
Armstrong the last 15 quarter hours of credit applicable toward 
the degree; and he must complete at Armstrong at least half of 

56 



the COUneS required ill his major field of Itudy. Wh< n (iuum- 

stances warrant 1 1 i s doing so, the Dean ol the College may permit 
i student to complete up to ten oi the List Hi quarter hours of 
credit .it anothei college. (A request for permission to complete 
more than ten ol these last i."> hours elsewhere will l>e referred 
to the Committee on Academic Standing.) 

7. For graduation the student must earn an over-all average ol 2.0 <>i 
better considering work taken at all colleges, computed in such 
manner that a course will he counted only once, regardless <>| the 
niunhei ol times th.n it has been repeated. The grade earned in 
the last attempt will determine the niunhei ol honor points as- 
signed lor graduation. 

Additionally, the student must earn a grade point average of 2.0 
or better on each of the following: 

a. all work at Armstrong; 

b. all courses in the major field. 
(For regulations on grade point average governing probation and 

dismissal, see page GO.) 

8. To qualify for a second baccalaureate degree, a candidate must 
earn at Armstrong at least 45 additional hours of credit and, of 
course, meet all qualitative requirements for the degree. 

9. Before a degree will be conferred upon a student by Armstrong 
State College he must pay all fees and must notify the Registrar 
in writing at least by the end of the preceding Fall Quarter 
of his intention to graduate. A candidate for a degree, unless 
excused in writing by the President, Dean of the College, or 
Dean of Student Affairs, must attend the graduation exercise at 
which a degree is to be conferred upon him. 

COURSE AND STUDY LOAD 

The normal course load for full-time students is 15 quarter hours 
(and a course in physical education during the freshman and sophomore 
years) . An average student should devote at least thirty hours each 
week, in addition, to course preparation. 

A full-time student is defined as one who is registered for 12 or 
more quarter hours. A part-time student is one registered for less than 
12 quarter hours. (The Veterans Administration and Selective Service 
regulations often require that the student be enrolled for more than 12 
quarter hours to be classified as a lull-time student.) 

The maximum course load for a student who works full-time is 
11 quarter hours. A working student should plan about ten hours 
preparation for each 5 quarter hour course. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

A student who has earned 45 quarter hours of credit will be 
classified as a sophomore; 90 quarter hours of credit, as a junior; 135 
quarter hours of credit, as a senior. 

57 



PERMISSION FOR OVERLOAD OR COURSES 
AT ANOTHER COLLEGE 

Permission to enroll for more than 17 quarter hours will be granted 
bv the Registrar to a student 

a) with an average grade of "B" for the preceding quarter, or 

b) in an engineering program, or 

c) requiring an extra course in one of the two quarters prior to 
graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 quarter 
hours in any one quarter. 

A student who is on academic probation will not be permitted 
to register for more than 17 quarter hours in any one quarter. 

Exceptions to these limitations may be made only by the Dean 
of the College. 

A student enrolled in Armstrong who at the same time pursues 
for credit at another college may not transfer such credit to .Armstrong, 
unless he has obtained in advance the written permission of the Dean of 
Armstrong State College to register for those courses. 

REPORTS AND GRADES 

The faculty feels that students in college should be held 
accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, grade reports, warnings 
of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not sent to parents or 
guardians by the Registrar except on request. Instead, the student them- 
selves receive these reports and are expected to contact their advisers 
whenever their worn is unsatisfactory. Grade reports are issued at the 
end of each quarter. Reports of unsatisfactory grades are issued in the 
middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an adviser; in addition, 
the Registrar and all instructors are available to help any student 
seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the folowing system of grading. 
GRADE HONOR POINTS 

A 4.0 

B 3.0 

C 2.0 

D 1.0 

F 

I Incomplete 

W Withdrew with no grade 
\VT Withdrew failing 
NC No Credit 

A student who receives an "I" (incomplete grade) should consult 
his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the 
course. An 'T' grade which has not been removed by the middle ol 
the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". 

53 



HONORS 
Dean'& List: Students enrolled Foi al I<-.m ten quarter hours of 

murse work who earn an honor point average ol ;it hast 5.3 will be 
placed on the Dean's List, which is published quarterly. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honoi point aver- 
se ol 5.2 through :'>.l n( .) will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor 
feint average ol 5.5 through 5.799 will be graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor 
point average of 5.8 through 4.0 will be graduated summa cum laude 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other accredited institutions 
will be considered in computing honors for graduation. 

ATTENDANCE 

The control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect 
ot .i student's attend. une on his grades in a course are left entirely to 
the discretion of the instructor. 

A student is resjxmsible for knowing everything that is announced, 
discussed, or lectured upon in class as well as for mastering all assigned 
reading; he is also responsible for turning in on time all assignments 
and tests, including recitation and unannounced quizzes. The best 
way to meet these responsibilities is to attend classes regularly. An 
.instructor may drop a student from anv (lass with a grade of "F" 
if he thinks that excessive absence prevents that student from satis- 
factorily fulfilling his responsibilities. If such excessive absence is 
the result of prolonged illness, death in the family, college business, 
or religious holidays, the withdrawal grade will be either "W" or "F" 
depending on the student's status at the time he was dropped. Each 
instructor will be responsible for informing his classes on their meet- 
ing what constitutes excessive absence in the particular class. Each 
student is responsible for knowing the attendance regulation in his 
class and for complying with it. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

All students who are enrolled for ten quarter hours or more on 
the day schedule are required to complete six physical education courses, 
one in each quarter of the freshman and sophomore years (111, 112, 
1 1 3 in the freshman year) . 

Any student who holds a valid senior life saving certificate and/or 
a valid water safety instructor certificate and/or passes the Armstrong 
swimming test may be exempt from the required swimming course. 

A student graduating with an Associate in Arts Degree in less 
than six quarters must take one course in each quarter of his freshman 
and sophomore years. 

Students enrolled in the Associate in Arts Degree program in 
nursing are required to complete three physical education courses. 

59 



A student who has completed at least six months of military service 
is required to take only tour courses of physical education, which he 
may choose from all scheduled offerings, during his freshman and sopho- 
more years. 

Physical education is not required of anyone who is beyond the 
age of 25 at the time of initial matriculation, or of anyone enrolled 
primarily in evening classes. 

The department requires all students to make up excused absences; 
unexcused absences lower the final grade. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

A student failing to maintain the gradepoint average indicated 
for quarter hours attempted will be placed on academic probation: 

Quarter Hours Attempted at 
Armstrong and Elsewhere 

0-15 

16-30 

31-45 

46-60 

61-75 

76-90 

91-105 
106-120 
121-135 and over 

A student on academic probation who raises his cumulative grade- 
point average during the probationary quarter to equal or exceed the 
appropriate figure in the foregoing table will be returned to good stand- 
ing. One who fails to achieve the required cumulative average, but 
does earn an average of at least 2.0 for the quarter, will be continued 
on probation for the next quarter of attendance. (A grade of T will 
be treated as 'F' until it is removed.) 

The student on academic probation who does not achieve the 
required cumulative average or who does not earn an average of at least 
2.0 tor the quarter in which he is on probation will be dismissed from 
the college lor one quarter. A third such academic dismissal will be final. 

A student re-entering the college after academic dismissal is placed 
on probation and must meet the requirement listed above. 

A student dismissed for academic reasons may appeal by letter to 
the President, who will refer the appeal to the Committee on Academic 
Standing. Such a letter ol appeal should state the nature of any ex- 
tenuating circumstances relating to the academic deficiency; the letter 
must be received by the President no later than 9 a.m. on registration 
day. 

60 




DROPPING COURSES 

A student desiring to drop .1 course aftei the quartei lias b 

mist obtain .1 Drop-Add Notice in the Office ol Studenl Affairs. ' 1 lu- 

lotice must be signed l>\ the instructor oi the course being dropped and 



urned l>\ the studenl 10 the Registrar's Office 



A student who drops .1 course not mote than seven <Liss daya 

ifter the course begins will receive the grade of "\\". A student who 

irops .1 course after the first seven class days and before the last eight 

lass days, will receive .1 grade ol "W" "!•". depending on his 

status in the course. \ student nia\ not \ oluni.ih 1\ drop a coins*- 

during the last eight elass days <>| a quarter. 

WITHDRAWING FROM COLLEGE 

Any student who finds it necessary to withdraw from college must 

3egin the process in the Oil ice ol Student Affairs. A formal withdrawal 

is required to insure that the student is eligible to return to Armstrong 

I State College at a future date. Any refund to which a student is en- 

' titled will be considered from the date which appears on the withdrawal 

form. 

AUDITING 

A regular student wishing to "audit" a course without receiving 
credit must obtain the written permission of the instructor before he 
registers for the course. During the registration process the student 
should request a special "audit" course card. (Policy for some courses 
forbids "auditing.") An "auditor" cannot change to regular credit status 
after the first week of class. A student may not change from credit 
status to audit status after the first seven class meetings. A student who 
registers for a course as an "auditor" receives no credit, "N.C.", on 
his trnascript. Regular schedules of fees apply to auditors. 
SYSTEM-WIDE ACHIEVEMENT TESTING PROGRAM 

University System policy requires that a 10% random sample of 
all first-time entering freshmen and a 10% random sample of all rising 
juniors must take the Survey of College Achievement tests. For the 
purpose of this program, students shall be classified as rising juniors 
during the quarter following the completion of 70 quarter credit hours 
of academic study exclusive of credit in physical education. 




61 



VII. Student Services, Activities 

The Office ol Student Affairs, administered by the Dean of 
Student Affairs, is responsible for all student services and activities. 
In addition to formal classroom instruction, the College recognizes the 
need foi providing programs and services which contribute to a well- 
rounded college experience. Such programs are administered by the 
Office <>l Student Affairs through the following individuals: Regis- 
trar, Admissions Officer, Counselors, Director of Financial Aid, Direc- 
tor of Student Activities, and the Campus Nurse. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Before and during registration, members of the faculty are avail- 
able to students for assistance in the selection of course work and in the 
scheduling of classes. Information concerning degree requirements and 
college regulations is provided and topics of general academic interest 
may be discussed. 

By the end of the sophomore year, students are required to 
designate a major field and are assigned to a faculty adviser in that 
area. The faculty adviser then works closely with the student in 
planning a program leading to the successful completion of regree re- 
quirements. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The faculty and administration of Armstrong State College recog- 
nize that students are frequently confronted with difficult and important 
decisions. In some instances, students need the competent assistance of 
professional persons who have been trained to deal with the specific 
problems of college students. 

In light of these needs, a counselor is located in the Office of 
Student Affairs to help students (1) clarify educational and vocational 
objectives, (2) develop effective study skills and habits, and (3) deal 
with problems of social and emotional significance. Services are available 
to all students at no charge. 

ORIENTATION 

Orientation for freshmen is scheduled prior to registration for the 
Fall Quarter. The program is designed to assist students in making the 
transition from high school to college and to acquaint them with 
school policies, traditions, and procedures. The Orientation Program 
includes an introduction to faculty and administration; a presentation 
of the purposes of Armstrong State College; indoctrination concerning 
the college's regulations and requirements: an introduction to student 
leaders and student activities; a survey of the facilities of the school; and 
an opportunity for the student to plan a program with counselors. 
Attendance is required. 

62 



PLACEMENT OFFICE 

The Placemen l Office, located in the Office ol Community Ser- 
vices, assists Armstrong State College graduate! in securing business and 
professional positions. \n\ senioi desiring assistance in securing em- 
ployment should contact this office. 

CONDUCT 

Ever) student who enrolls in .1 course at Armstrong State Colli 

(commits himself. l>y the act ol enrolling, to lull compliance with the 

rules .ind regulations of the Honor System and (lode ol Conduct. The 
Honoi System is outlined under "Academic Regulations" in this Bulletin 
and the Code ol Conduct appears at the end ol this section. 

Compliance with the regulations and policies of the faculty of 
Armstrong State College and the Regents ol the University System of 
Georgia is assumed. To enroll is to agree to assume responsibility for 
obeying and to agree to use established channels to promote change. 
Not to do so is sufficient basis for the college to terminate the contract. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

In addition to an outstanding academic program, Armstrong State 
College offers a complete program of extra-curricular student activities 
designed to contribute to the development of the student and to assist 
him in becoming an active and productive member of the community 
in which he lives. 

Student organizations at Armstrong State College reflect the 
natural variety of interests found in a diversified student body. Indi- 
viduals who seek a well-rounded education will avail themselves of the 
varied opportunities afforded through the college program of student 
activities. 

A variety of clubs and organizations representing varied interests 
and activities are available to students at Armstrong State College. 
These include the following. 

Service: 

Circle K 

Alpha Phi Omega 
Religious: 

Wesley Foundation 
Baptist Student Union 
Greeks: 

Alpha Tau Beta Sorority 

Delta Phi Upsilon Sorority 

Phi Mu Sorority 

Chi Phi Fraternity 

Phi Delta Gamma Fraternity 

Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity 

63 



Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity 
Sigma Kappa Chi Fraternity 

Professional: 

Student Nurses Association of Georgia 

Future Secretaries Association 

Student National Education Association 

Hie Psi 

American [unior Dental Hygienists Association 

Interest: 
Glee Club 
Pep Band 
Chess Club 
Cheerleaders 
Literary Club 
Masquers 
Young Democrats 
Pep Club 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Student Government Association is the official governing 
body of the students at Armstrong State College. It assists in formulating 
a program of student services and activities, and it strives to express the 
will of the majority of students and to provide experience in democratic 
living. 

All students are automatically members of the Student govern- 
ment Association and are entitled to a vote in matters of concern to stu- 
dents. Qualified students may seek positions of leadership in the Student 
Government Association by running for office during the spring quarter. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The two official student publications on campus are the Inkwell. 
(the college newspaper) and the Geechee (the college annual) . Both pub- 
licaions are produced entirely by students under the supervision of 
qualified faculty members. Financed in part by the Student Activity 
Fund, these publications provide opportunities tor students in creative 
writing, reporting, and design. 

HEALTH 

Armstrong State College maintains a campus infirmary where 
a registered nurse is on duty from 8:15 a.m. until 5 p.m. Students who 
become ill or who are involved in accidents while on campus should 
not hesitate to avail themselves of this service. 

I he college also makes available, on a voluntary basic, a student 
health and accident insurance policy. The cost of the policy is S12 for 
a lull \ear. Information regarding the program may be secured in the 
Office of Student A Hairs. 

64 



\I 1'MXI OFFICE 

The primary purposes <>i the Vlurani Office are i<> k<<j> fonnei itu* 
tents informed about the college and t<> help them keep in touch with 
•.(( h other. \n\ person who at any time w.i^ matriculated .is a regulai 
jtudeni is eligible i<m membership in the Alumni Association and, 
upon payment <>i his dues, will receive the quarterly newsletter, "The 
Geechee Gazette," and may vote and hold office in the Association, 
fhe Alumni Office assists in arranging class reunions, board meetings, 
and other functions. For further information contact the Director of 
Public Information. 



HOUSING 

Private apartments for male, female, and married students are 
available within walking distance of Armstrong State College. During 
the 1970-71 session, Candler General Hospital will make its dormitory 
which formerly housed student nurses available to any single female 
Armstrong students who are interested in dormitory accommodations. 
For further information regarding housing, please contact the Office 
of Student Affairs. 



ATHLETICS 

Armstrong State College participates in inter-collegiate athletic 
competition in basketball, baseball, and golf. Additional athletic oppor- 
tunities are provided through the Intramural Program in the areas of 
basketball, softball, swimming, and volleyball. 



CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Armstrong State College provides a variety of cultural opportuni- 
ties for its students. Lectures by eminent scholars in the various academic 
fields and musical concerts by outstanding artists are an integral part 
of the program in general education. Student dramatic productions 
under professional direction and the student choral society have created 
distinguished traditions for these groups. 

65 



Student Code of Conduct 

I. THE CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 
A. Genera] Policies 

1. rhe College is dedicated not only to learning and the advance- 
ment of knowledge, but also to the development of ethically sensitive 
and responsible persons. It seeks to achieve these goals through a sound 
educational program and policies governing student conduct that en- 
courage independence and maturity. 

2. The College distinguishes its responsibility for student conduct 
from the control functions of the community. When a student has been 
apprehended lor the violation of a law of the community, the state, or the 
nation, the College will not request or agree to special consideration for 
the student because of his status as a student. The College will cooperate, 
however, with law enforcement agencies and with other agencies in any 
program lor the rehabilitation of the student. 

3. The College may apply sanctions or take other appropriate action 
only when student conduct directly and significantly interferes with the 
College's (a) primary educational responsibility or ensuring the oppor- 
tunity of all members of the College community to attain their educa- 
tional objectives, or (b) subsidiary responsibilities of protecting pro- 
perty, keeping records, providing services, and sponsoring non-classroom 
activities such as lectures, concerts, athletic events, and social functions. 

4. Students are subject to the separate provisions of the Armstrong 
State College Honor Code, violations of which are not set forth in Sec- 
tion C below. The first hearing on violations of the Honor Code shall 
be before the Honor Council in accordance with the provisions of the 
Honor Code. 

5. Procedural fairness is basic to the proper enforcement of all College 
lules. In particular, no disciplinary sanction as serious as expulsion, 
susj>ension, disciplinary probation, or entry of an adverse notation on 
any permanent record available to persons outside the College shall be 
imposed unless the student has been notified in writing of the charges 

Mist him and has had an opportunity (a) to appear alone or with 
any other persons to advise and assist him before an appropriate com- 
mittee, court, or official, (b) to know the nature and source of the 
evidence against him and to present evidence in his own behalf, and 
(c) to have his case reviewed in accordance with Part II, Paragraph C 
below. 

6. Students shall have an opportunity to participate in the formation 
ol all policies and rules pertaining to student conduct and in the 
enforcement of all such rules. 

66 



7. No disciplinary action shall be imposed on .1 itudenl b) or in the 
name <>i the College except in accordance with this Code 01 the Honoi 

Code, whi< hever shall apply. 

B. Sanctions 

1. Sanctions which ma\ be imposed for the commission of colli 
offenses shall include the following: 

(a) Expulsion From the College. Expulsion means permanent 

separation Iroin the College. 

(b) Suspension from the College for a definite or indefinite 
period of time. Suspension means Involuntary disenrollment 
and or withdrawal ol the privilege of enrollment. 

(c) Disciplinary probation with or without loss of designated 
privileges lor a definite period of time. The violation of 
the terms of the disciplinary probation or the infraction of any 
college rule during the period of disciplinary probation may 
be grounds for suspension or expulsion from the College. 
The parents of any student under 21 years of age who is 
placed on disciplinary probation, suspended, or expelled 
shall be notified. 

(d) Social probation with loss of such specified privileges as may 
be consistent with the offense committed. The loss of privile- 
ges shall be for a definite period of time. 

(e) Reprimand. A written rebuke, of which a record will be re- 
tained in the student's file so long as he remains at Arm- 
strong, but which will not be forwarded to any other college 
or employer. 

(f) Admonition and warning. 

2. The sanctions of expulsion or suspension ordinarily shall be im- 
posed only upon the recommendation of the Student Court. In extra- 
ordinary circumstances, where gross violations of conduct rules are 
disrupting the proper function of the College, students may be summarily 
suspended by the Dean of Student Affairs. Appeal from such suspension 
may be made in accordance with Part II, Paragraph C, Appeal Proce- 
dures, below. 

C. Violations 

1. Expulsion or suspension from the College or any lesser sanction 
may result from the commission of any of the folowing offenses: 

(a) Conduct which is in violation of federal, state or local laws 
which was committed on campus, or which involves college 
property or which is against members of the College com- 
munity acting in their official capacity. 

(b) Violations of published Policies of the Board of Regents of 

67 



die University System of Georgia, a copy of which shall be 
on reserve in the library. 

Participantion In any hazing - like act, physical or mental, 
perpetrated for the purpnse of submitting a student to physi- 
cal pain, discomfort, indignity, or humiliation at any time 
or any place. 

(d) Forgery, alteration, destruction, or misuse of college docu- 
ments, records, or identification cards, or furnishing false 
information to the College with intent to deceive, or posses- 
sion or use of fire arms. 

(e) Reproducing or unauthorized possession of keys to any college 
facility or entering any college facility without proper 
authority. 

(f) Malicious destruction, damage, or misuse of college property, 
including library materials, or of private property on the 
campus. 

(g) Direct disobedience of orders given by a college official who 
has identified himself and is acting within his authority. 
This would include failure to present, within a reasonable 
amount of time, the College identification acrd. 

(h) Two or more (or repetition of) offenses listed in paragraph 
below. 

2. Disciplinary probation or any lesser sanction may result from the 
commission of any of the following offenses: 

(a) Failure to comply with Georgia law concerning the use, 
possession, or consumption of alcoholic beverages. This would 
include all on-campus activities and those off-campus activ- 
ities paid for out of Student Activity Funds. 

(b) Disorderly conduct on campus or at off-campus affairs financ- 
ed by Student Activity Funds. 

(c) Violation of any college rule, subsequently promulgated by 
the College for the infraction of which sanctions may be 
imposed under this Code. All such rules shall be in writing 
and shall be published and posted on the official College 
Bulletin Board in such manner as to furnish adequate notice 
of their contents to students affected by such rules. The Col- 
lege's failure to comply with this requirement shall be a 
complete defense of any charge of violation of a rule of which 
the student has no actual knowledge. A students failure to fam- 
iliarize himself with published rules shall not be an adequate 
defense. 

D. Group Offenses 

1. Living organizations, societies, clubs, and similar organized groups 
are responsible lor compliance with college regulations. Upon satisfactory 

68 



proof thai the -l;i <>iij> li. is encouraged, oi did not take reasonable steps 
as .1 group to preveiK violations oi college regulations, the group ma) 
be subjected to permanent or temporal*) suspension ol charter, social 
probation, denial ol use oi college facilities, oi othei like sanctions. 

2, The determination that .1 group is liable to sanction under the 
foregoing Section 1. ami of the sanction 10 be imposed, shall be made 
by the Student Activities Committee al .1 hearing held foi that purpose, 
The president 01 principal office] ol tin group must he given reasonable 

notice ol the time and place ol said hearing and ol the nature ol the 
charges. He or any other member of the group is entitled to attend and 
be heard at the hearing. 

:'>. Nothing herein authorizes the Imposition of individual sanctions 
my person other than in accordance with the Code ol Student Con- 



luct 



E. The Student Conduct Committee 

1. The Student Conduct Committee shall be responsible to the fac- 
ulty and the President of the College for recommending policies relating 
to student conduct, for formulating or approving rules and enforce- 
ment procedures within the framework of existing policies, and for 
recommending to the President of the College changes in the adminis- 
tration of any aspect of the student - conduct program. 

2. The Committee shall consist of four teaching faculty members, the 
Dean of Student Affairs, and four student members, one representing 
each class. The faculty members shall be appointed by the faculty in 
accordance with the faculty by - laws. The student members shall be 
appointed by the Student Senate. Each member shall serve for a period 
of one year. Members of the Committee may be reappointed and re- 
placement members may be appointed at such time as is necessary to 
assure full membership of the committee. The President of the College 
may appoint temporary members of the Committee to serve during the 
summer term. A chairman, a vice-chairman, and a secretary shall be 
elected at the first meeting of the committee. 

3. The Dean of Student Affairs shall assist the Committee in the 
development of policy and in the discharge of its responsibilities. He 
shall coordinate the activities of all officials, committees, student 
groups, and tribunals responsible for student conduct. 

4. All regulations or rules relating to student conduct that are pro- 
posed by any college official, committee or student group, and for 
which sanctions may be imposed in the name of the College, must be 
submitted to the Committee for consideration and review prior to 
submission to the faculty. 

69 



I- . I he Studenl ( fcxii t 

1. The Student Court shall be composed of eight students, two 
representing each class. Four of the members shall be the Vice-Presidents 
ol the respective classes. The remaining four members shall be appointed 
by the Studenl Senate. Any student not in good standing with the Col- 
li -c in academi< or disciplinary matters shall be ineligible to serve on 
the Student Court. The Court shall elect a chairman, a vice-chairman, 
and a recorder from its membership. A faculty adviser shall be appoint- 
ed 1j\ the faculty from among three nominations made by the Student 
Court. 

2. A quorum of the Court shall consist of five members. A decision 
that a student has committed an offense requires an affirmative vote of 
three-fifths of the members of the Court deciding the case. Sanctions of 
suspension or expulsion may likewise be imposed only by three-fifths 
of such members. Sanctions of lesser severity than suspension or expul- 
sion shall be made by majority vote. 

3. A written copy of the Court's decision shall be given to the 
student concerned. The decision shall advise the student of his rights 
to appeal. 

4. The Court may impose any authorized sanction which is warrant- 
ed by the circumstances of the case. 

5. If overt intimidation of the Sutdent Court is established, the 
President of the College will refer the case involved to the Student 
Conduct Committee for action. 

Amendments to the above Code may be proposed by the Student 
Senate, and the Student Senate shall be given an opportunity to review 
all amendments proposed by the faculty. Amendments will be effective 
when approved by a three-fifths vote of the faculty and of the student 
body. 

H. Board of Regents' Policy as Final Authority 

None of the regulations and procedures herein contained shall be 
in conflict with policies of the Board of Regents of the Georgia Univer- 
sity System. Policies of the Board of Regents shall be governing in all 
student conduct matters. 

II. THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE CODE 

A. General Procedures 

1. All violations of the Code will be immediately reported to the 
Dean of Student Affairs by any person who has knowledge of the com- 
mission of any such violation. 

70 



2. I he Dr. in of Student Affairs shall insure tha( the best interests of 
;mv offending student are served, regardless <>i whether disciplinary 
action is taken, i>\ making sure that the student is advised <>l his rights. 

5. Where sufficient evidence exists that a violation oi lav has occurr- 
ed, the Dean oi Student Affairs shall refci the case and transmit the 
evidence to the appropriate enforcement agency. 

1. Where the evidence establishes to his satisfaction thai a college 
offense has occurred, the Dean of Student Affairs shall advise the stu- 
dent of the charges against him and ask the student il he prefers to 
lave the offense handled administratively or to have the case referred 

to the Student Coin! loi hearing. II the student prefers that the case 
not be referred to the Student Court, he will be required to sign a 
S/aiver of his right to a hearing before the Student Court. 

B. The Student Court 

1. Any student whose case is referred to the Student Court shall be 
notified of such referral in writing by the Dean of Student Affairs at 
last three days before the hearing and shall be apprised in the notice 
of the charges against him. Dining the hearing the student shall have 
the opportunity (a) to appear in person and/or with counsel, (b) to 
know the evidence against him, and (c) to call witnesses and to present 
evidence and argument in his behalf. In the resolution of factual dis- 
putes, the court will request the testimony of witnesses and otherwise 
seek the best evidence obtainable. 

2. The Court shall be convened by its presiding officer to consider 
the evidence of a reported violation as soon as reasonably possible 
after the accused has had the required three days notice. 

3. A record shall be made of each witness's testimony. 

4. Immediately upon conclusion of a hearing, the student concerned 
shall be notified of the findings and recommendation that the court will 
make to the President of the College and of his right to appeal. 

C. APPEAL PROCEDURES 

1. The student shall have the right to appeal from any sanction. 

2. The Student Court when initally recommending a sanction shall 
advise the student, in writing, of his right to appeal to the President of 
the College. The student shall have five days from the receipt of such 
advice to render his appeal to the President, who shall refer it to a 
committee in accordance with Board of Regents' Policy. 

3. Appeal from decisions of the President of the College may be 
made to the Board of Regents of the University System under the Board 
of Regents' stated policy. 

71 



Ill RULES AND REGULATIONS 

(to be added as promulgated) 




\ 



mm 



72 



VIII. DEGREE PROGRAMS 



du' 



Ml baccalaureate degrees awarded by Armstrong State Collegi 
ire as a core curriculum the following minimum numbei <>l quartei 
hours in the majoi areas of study: 

Minimum Quarter 

Areas of Study Horns lie, (faired 

I. Humanities, including, but no* Limited to grammar and com- 
position and literature - 20 

II. Mathematics and the natural sciences, including but not limit- 
ed to, mathematics and a ID-hour sequence of laboratory courses 
in the biological or physical sciences _ 20 

III. Social sciences, including, but not limited to, history and Ameri- 
can government __ - 20 

IV. Physical Education 6 

Total 66 

1. BACHELOR OF ARTS AND 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major 
in English, French, history, or music, or Bachelor of Science with a ma- 
jor in biology, chemistry, or mathematics, the following requirements 
must be completed in accordance with the regulations stated in this 
bulletin. Requirements for each major program are described in the 
appropriate departmental listing. 

Requirements for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Science. 

1. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 
(Core Curriculum) 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. One Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 15 

3. Music, Art, or Philosophy 201 5 

4. History of Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251 or 252 5* 

Political Science 113 5* 

6. One of the following courses: 5 

*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted by 
Examination in order to meet the state requhement for graduation (see page 56) , 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

73 



.economics ^ui 
Psychology 101 
Sociology 201 

7. Mathematics: an approved sequence 10 

8. One of the following sequences of two courses 10 

Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 

85 

II. Courses in theMajor Field ( ! ) 40-70 

(No student will be allowed to take senior division 
courses in his major field unless he has a minimum 
of C in all prerequisite courses in that field.) 

III. Courses in Related Fields ( 2 ) 15-30 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 

courses 6 

V. Free Electives ( 3 ) 15 (or 

more to complete a minimum of 
185 quarter hours, exclusive of 
physical education) 

11. TEACHER EDUCATION 

The standard credential for teaching in the public schools of 
Georgia is the Teacher"s Professional Four- Year Certificate (T-4) . To 
qualify for this certificate, one must have completed an approved pro- 
gram designed for a specific teaching field and be recommended by 
the college in which the program was completed. Armstrong State Col- 
lege offers the following approved teacher education programs: (See 
pages 77-86.) 



(1) For its major program a department mav not require more than 60 quarter 
hours at all levels in the major field, but it may recommend up to 70 quarter hours. 

(2) For its major program a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours 
of specific courses or approved elective courses in related fields, and language courses 
reaching the degree of proficiency specified by the department. (If a course is 
counted as fulfilling the General Requirements, it will not also fulfill the requirement 
for •III. Courses in Related Fields.") Total requirements for II and III may not 
exceed 85 quarter hours. 

(3) For the B.A. and B.S. degrees a minimum of 185 quarter hours, exclusive of 
physical education, is required for graduation. 

74 






ci R I IFICA I ION PROGR \.\is 
1 lementai j Edu< ation (< .1 acta 1-8) 
Spec* h ( kw ici lion 
Secondary Programs (Grades 7-12) 

Business Education 

English 

Mathematics 

Science (Biology) 

Science (Chemistry) 

Social Studies (History) 

Social Studies (Political Science) 

All students completing teacher education programs are required 

to take both the Common Examinations and the appropriate Teach- 
ing An. 1 Examination ol the National Teacher Examinations. Students 
must submit the scores from these examinations or evidence that the 
examinations have been completed to the Department of Education 
before they can be recommended for a teaching certificate. Additional 
information about the National Teacher Examinations can be secured 
from the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. 

Teacher Library Service Endorsement 

This program may constitute an area of concentration for elemen- 
tary teachers and an endorsement on the certification of secondary tea- 
chers. The program is also intended to create interest in librarianship. 
The courses are as follows: 

Library Science 310, 320, 410, 420 20 Q.H. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

A student who desires to become an elementary or secondary school 
teacher should apply during the first quarter ol residence to the Depart- 
• ment of Education for academic advisement. He should follow without 
deviation the approved program designed for his preparation and for 
meeting the requirements for the certificate to teach. Upon admission to 
teacher education, sttidents w r ill be assigned advisors as follows: 

(1) Elementary education majors are assigned an advisor in the 
Department of Education who will assist the student in planning 
the total program of studies. 

(2) Students pursuing secondary teaching programs will be assigned 
an advisor in the Department of Education to assist them con- 
cerning the professional sequence courses and certification re- 
quirements. In addition, students will have an advisor in the 
teaching field major to approve the courses of the teaching 
field. Assignment of the teaching field advisor will be made by 
the head of the academic department offering the major. Each 

75 



student must have his secondary teaching program approved in 
advance In lx>th advisors. Special iorms for this purpose are to be 
filed with each advisor and a copy given to the student. 

ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

All students pursuing a degree program leading toward certification 
1>\ the G Mate Department of Education as a teacher must apply 

for admission to teacher education at Armstrong State College. This 
application will noimalh take place during the third quarter of the 
sophomore year or, for transfer students, in the first quarter of the 
junior year. Application forms ma\ be secured from the office of the 
II ad ol the Department of Education. The lollowing criteria are used 
in admitting applicants to teacher education: 

(1) Completion of at least 75 quarter hours of college credit with 
a "C " average and completion of Education 203 with a "C" or 
better. 

(2) Competence in oral and written expression. 

(3) Satisfactory physical and emotional health. 

(4) Indication of desirable attitude, character, and teaching poten- 
tial. 

SEPTEMBER PRACTICUM 

The purposes of the September Practicum are to provide an op- 
port unity for future teachers (1) to learn what teachers do at the beginn- 
ing of a new school term. (2) to participate in experiences that will 
st the prospective teacher with future decisions concerning teaching 
S a career, and (3) to become acquainted with the organization and 
curriculum of a particular school. 

The September Practicum occurs during the first two weeks of i 
the public school term (usually in late August and early September) 
and should be scheduled during the student's junior or senior year. 
No credit is given for the September Practicum. but it is a requirement 
in all of the teaching iields in the Armstrong State College Teacher 
Education Program. 

Application for the September Practicum should be made during 
the first week of the Spring Quarter for a September Practicum in the 
forthcoming September. The student should contact the Director of 
Professional Laboratory Experiences in the Department of Education. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Student leaching, the culminating activity of the professional 
sequence, is provided in selected off-campus public school centers. The 
lull quartei ol student teaching is arranged cooperatively by the college.. 

7b 



he participating schools, and supervising teachers. Completed applica- 
nts foi admission to studeni teaching musl be submitted to the 
tfrectoi ol Professional Laboratory Experiences during the liist week 
•I' the quarter preceding studeni teaching. While student teaching, the 
tudeni is required to adhere to established policies and procedures 
|»i tlu' cooperating school system in addition to those policies and pro- 
edures established t>\ the college and the Department ol Education. 

A student is admitted to student teaching .it the time assignment 
is made. While studeni preferences and other personal circumstances 
lit- considered, the Department of Education reserves the right to exer- 
pe its discretion in placement. The student will receive a Utter of 
pignment. Orientation to studen; teaching will be held during the 
iiM several days ol the quarter in which student teaching is scheduled. 
The following requirements must be met before a student can enroll 
n student teaching: 

(1) Be admitted to the Teacher Education Program. 

(2) Have at least senior status. 

(3) Have completed the required professional sequence courses 
with a grade of "C" or higher. Elementary majors must make 
a grade of "C" or higher on all specialized content courses. 

(4) Have a "C" average at Armstrong State College on all courses 
attempted, and a "C" or higher on all courses acceptable toward 
the teaching field or concentration. 

(5) Have satisfactorily completed the related professional laboratory 
experiences including the "September Practicum." 

(6) Be recommended by two (2) academic professors and two (2) 
members of the Department of Education. 

(7) Be approved by the Head of the Department of Education. 

(8) Have successfully completed at least four of the specialized con- 
tent courses, including Education 425, the Teaching of Reading. 

A student will not be permitted to take additional courses during 
student teaching or to hold any form of employment. Student teachers 
are not permitted to teach in a school in which their children are en- 
rolled. 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
Speech Correction 

I. General Requirements: 91 Quarter Hours 

1. Humanities: 30 quarter hours 

Art 200, Music 200, or Philosophy 201 5 

77 



English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

Speech 228 5 

2. Social Sciences: 30 quarter hours 

History 114, 115, 251*, 252* 20 

Political Science 113* 5 

Psychology 101 5 

3. Science: 25 quarter hours 

Biology 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 121, 122 or Physics 211, 212 10 

Mathematics 105 5 

4. Physical Education: 6 quarter hours 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113, 204 4 

Two 200 courses 2 

II. Speech Correction Teaching Field: 50 Quarter Hours 

1. Normal Speech Development: 25 quarter hours 

Special Education 315 5 

Special Education 320 5 

Special Education 325 5 

Special Education 330 5 

Special Education 335 5 

2. Speech Deviations and Language Problems: 25 quarter hours 

Special Education 310 5 

Special Education 410 5 

Special Education 415 5 

Special Education 420 5 

Special Education 445 5 

III. Related Course: 5 quarter hours 

Psychology 3 1 2 5 

IV. Professional Sequence Courses: 45 quarter hours 

Psychology 30 1 5 

Education 203, 301, 425, 437, 446, 447, 448 35 

Special Education 305 5 

Total 191 



•If otic of these history courses and this political science course are exempted by 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 56) , 
the ten quarter hours shall he allotted to electives. 

78 



Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
I. General Requirements: !'<> Quarter Hours 

1. Humanities: 30 quarter hours 

An 200, Mumc 200, or Philosoph) 201 5 

English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

Speech 228 _ 5 

2. Social Sciences: 35 quarter hours 

Geography 1 1 1 _ 5 

History 111, 115, 251*, 252* _ 20 

Political Science 113* - 5 

Psychology 1 1 5 

3. Science: 25 quarter hours 

Biology 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 121, 122 or Physics 211, 212 10 

Mathematics 105 5 

4. Physical Education: 6 quarter hours 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113, 204 4 

Two 200 courses 2 

II. Electives: 25 quarter hours 

1. Approved electives to establish added proficiency in one area 
to be known as concentration chosen to correspond to the ele- 
mentary curriculum: art, English, mathematics, modern foreign 
languages, music, sciences, social sciences, or Teacher Library 
Service 20 

2. Approved elective in related field 5 

III. Specialized Content Courses: 30 quarter hours 

Art 320 5 

Education 425 5 

English 33 1 5 

Mathematics 350 5 

Music 320 5 

Physical Education 320 5 

IV. Professional Sequence Courses: 40 quarter hours 

Psychology 30 1 5 

Education 203, 301, 435, 436, 446, 447, 448 35 



Total 191 

79 



PROGRAM FOR SECOxNDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 
OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. His. 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. Speech 228 5 

3. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

4. Principles of Economics (Ec. 201, 202) 10 

5. American Government (Pol. Sc. 113)* 5 

6. Mathematics 100, 135, 211 15 

7. One of the following- requirements of two courses: 10 

Biology 101, 102 

Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 

8. Psychology 101 plus four of the following courses 25 

Economics 326 

History 251* or 252* 

Psychology 305 

Sociology 201 

Music 200, Art 200, or Philosophy 201 

II. Courses in Business Education 23-28 

104 Beginning Typing (Often Exempted) 2 

105 Intermediate Typing 2 

106 Advanced Typing 2 

111 Shorthand, Beginning (Often Exempted) 3 

112 Shorthand, Beginning 3 

113 Shorthand, Intermediate 3 

212 Office Machines 3 

213 Office Procedures 5 

315 Business Communications 5 



*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted b 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 50) 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

ao 



II. Courses in Business Administration 'l r > 

B.A. 211, 212 10 

Select three <>i the following courses 15 

1. B. \. 507, Business Lai* I 

2. li.A. MO, Principles ol Marketing 

:'.. r»..\. 875, Personnel Administration 
1. \\.\. 560 Principles ol Management 
5. Eg 527, Monej and Banking 
G. Eg 531, Labor and Industrial Relations 
7. Eg 535, Publi< Finance 

V. Physical Education 111. 112, 113, 201, and two 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology 501 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 437, 438 - Secondary School Curriculum and Secon- 
dary School Methods. Business Education 10 

Education \\6, 447, 148 - Student Teaching 15 



191-196 



PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 

OF ENGLISH 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

^^ ^ Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 1ZT, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. One Foreign Language 20" 

3. Art 200 or Music 200 .^-.^^ 5- 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 25f* r or 252^. 5 

6. Psychology lul and Political Science 113* 10 

7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. One of the following requirements of two courses: 10 

Biology 101, 102— 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 

II. Courses in Major Field 

Students must complete the requirements for a major in English 
including English 325. Five hours of the Related Fields 
must be Speech 228 or Speech 341. 



If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted by 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 5G) , 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

81 



III. Related Fields (Select four courses) 20 

Education 425 ^ 
Fine Arts V 

(200 and above) 
Foreign Language 

(200 and above) 
History 25J, or 2^2 
History 341 
History 348 
History 350 
History 354 
Philosophy 20n 
Speech 228-/ 
Speech 341 
Speech 345 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113, 204, and two 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 203 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 439 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 

English 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 



Total 191 

PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 
OF MATHEMATICS 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, Music 200, or Philosophy 201 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251* or 252* 5 

6. Psychology 101 and one of the following: 

Biology 101, 102 
Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics (unless waived) 5-10 

8. One of the following requirements of two courses: 10 

Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 121, 122 



*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted b\ 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 5(i) 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

82 



Chemistry 128, 129 

Physics 21 I. 212 

Physics 217, 218 
II. AcUlition.il Courses in Major Field (Mathematics) . 50 

Students must complete the 50-quarter-hour requirements [or 
a major in mathematics, rhese must include Mathematics 104, 
201, 202, 203, 505, 311-312, and (309-332) or (101-102). 

III. Related Fields (beyond the core curriculum requirements) 15 

IV. Physical Kdmation 111, 112. L13, 204, and two 200 courses _— G 
V. Piofessional Sequence 30 

Education 203 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education la7 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 

General 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 

Total 191 

PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS OF 
SCIENCE WITH MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, Music 200, or Philosophy 201 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251* or 252* 5 

6. Psychology 101 and one of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics (100-135) or (101-102) 10 

8. The following courses: 15 

Biology 101, 102 

Botany 203 or Zoology 201 

II. Courses in Biology (Junior-Senior level) 40 

Students must complete the requirements for a major in Biology 
including Biology 370, 380; Botany 380 o. Zoology 390 

III. Courses in other Sciences 35 

Chemistry 128, 129, 341, 342, 343 
Physics 211, 212 

*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted by 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 56) , 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

83 



IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113, 204, two 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 203 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 137 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 

General 5 

Education 446, 447. 448 - Student Teaching 15 



Total 201 

PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 
OF SCIENCE WITH MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

;1. Art 200. Music 200, or Philosophy 201 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251* or 252* 5 

6. Psychology 101 and one of the following courses 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics and Math 104 15 

8. Chemistry 128-129 10 

II. Courses in Chemistry 50 

Chemistry 281. 282 10 

Chemistry 341, 342, 343 15 

Chemistry 491, 492, 493 12 

Chemistry 480 5 

Electives in Chemistry 8 

III. Courses in Other Sciences 25 

Physics 15 

Biology 101, 102 10 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113, 204. and two 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 203 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 437 - Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 

General 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 



Total 201 

♦If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted bv 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation see page 3(3), 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

84 



PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL I 1 \( III RS 
OF SOCIAL SCIENCI History or Political Science) 

I. General Requirements in the Libera] Vrsl and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. One Foreign Language 15 
:'.. Music 200, Art200, oi Philosophy 201 . 5 
1. Histor) oi Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History ol the U.S., 251 oi 252* 

6. Political Science 113*, Psychology 101 - 10 

7. Freshman Mathematics - 10 

8. One ol the following sequences of two courses .. 10 

Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Chemistry 12 1, 122 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 

II. Courses in Major: History or Political Science '. 40 

1. A student majoring in history must take 5 qtr. hrs. of his- 
toriography (History 300), 15 qtr. hrs. of American history 
including 251 or 252, 10 qtr. hrs. of European history, and 
10 qtr. hrs. of Far Eastern history. Supporting work must 
include at least three of the following fields: political science, 
economics, sociology, geography, and anthropology. 

2. A student majoring in political science must complete the 
requirements for a major in political science and must in- 
clude in his program courses in American constitutional de- 
velopment, comparative government, political theory, and in- 
ternational relations. Supporting work must include History 
251 or 252 and at least one other advanced history course 
and at least two ol the following fields: economics, sociology, 
geography, and anthropology. 

III. Courses in other social sciences 30 

Excluding his major Held (history or political science) , the student 
will select 30 qtr. hrs. of work in three of the following groups 
of social science courses: 

1. History 251 or 252 and one other advanced course 10 

2. Pol. Sci. 200 and one of the following: 

307, 308, 319, and 332 10 

3. Economics 201 and one of the following: 

326, 331, or 345 10 



*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted by 
Examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 56) , 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

85 



4. Sociology 201 and 350 10 

5. Geography and or Anthropology 10 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113, 204, and two other courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 203, Orientation to Teaching 5 

Ps\chology 301, Educational Psychology 5 

Education 440, Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 

Social Science 5 

Education 446, 447, 448, Student Teaching 15 

Total 191 

III. BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istrztion with a major in accounting, economics or management- 
marketing, the following requirements must be completed in accordance 
with the regulations stated in this bulletin. For major concentrations, 
see requirements described under Department of Business Administra- 
tion. 

For Graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istration, the minimum requirements in the various fields of study will 
be: 

I. Humanities 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

1. Music, Art, or Philosophy 201 5 

25 
II. Social Sciences 

1 Hi r „f P;vii; 7 ,Hnn 114 IK 10 

2. Principles of Economics 201, 202 10 

3. Politi calJkiciiLfi-JJil (or elective if Political Science 113 is 
exempted by examination) 5 

25 
III. Mathematics and Natural Science 

1. Mathematics 100, 135, 211 15 

2. Laboratory Science (Sequence) 10 

25 
86 



V. Business Administration 

1. [ntrodiH toi j Accounting Jl I . ;' i ! I'» 

2. Business Vdministi .it ion 200 ' "i 



15 
TOTAL FRESHMAN WD SOPHOMORI HOURS 
I ex< luding Physii .il Eilurui ion ) 90 

V. Approved electives from the Humanities, the Social Sciences, 

Witin .il S< ien< es t»i Mathemati< s. 30 

History 251 <>i 252 musi be included (unless exempted by ex- 
amination) and Speech 228 is recommended. At least 15 quarter 
hours must be in courses numbered 200 or above. Nol more 
than It) quarter hours may bo in Business Administration courses. 

.'I. Business Core Requirements - — 35 

Economics majors — see pages 109. 110, and 111) 

B A .807. Business I .aw 
B.A. 320, Business Finance 
Economics 311, Quanitiative Methods 
Economics 327, Money and Banking 

and three selected from the folowing: 
B.A. 340, Principles of Marketing 
B.A. 360, Principles of Management 
Economics 331, Labor and Industrial Relations 
Economics 335, Public Finance 
Economics 405, Government and Business 

Note: Economics majors may select any approved combination 
from the business core and the major concentration courses. 

VII. Major Concentration 30 

(See Departmental requirements) 

VIII. Physical Education 6 

Total Requirements 191 

TWO-YEAR COMMERCE-SECRETARIAL 
PROGRAM 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for secretarial positions in business after two years of 
study. Students enroll in the Associate in Arts program (listed else- 
where in this bulletin) , devoting the permitted 30 hours of elective 
credits to business and commerce subjects as necessary. The Associate in 



•Business Administration 200 is not open to upper-division business majors who 
have taken 300-level courses in business or economics. 

87 



Arts degree is awarded upon completion of the program. Electives 
under this program should be selected from the following: 

Business Education 104, 105, 106 4-6* 

Business Education 111, 112, 113 6-9* 

Business Education 212, 213 8 

Business Administration 211 5 

Business Administration 315 5 

IV. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. History of the U.S. : 5 

3. History 114-115 10 

4. Mathematics 101-102 or 100-135 10 

5. Foreign Languages (15 qtr. hrs. or 10 hrs. plus 

elective) 10-15 

6. Psychology 101, Sociology 201 10 

7. Physics 211, 212 10 

8. Chemistry 128-129, 281-282, 341-342 30 

9. Biology 101, 102 20 

Zoology 204 

Zoology 356 

10. Biology 351 and Zoology 372 10 

One course from the following: 

Entomolgy 30 1 5 

Entomology 301 5 

Zoology 357 
Zoology 390 

Physical Education 6 

Elective 5 



156 

After satisfactorily completing the required number of courses 
and hours listed above, the degree candidate must complete 12 months 
in Clinical Medical Technology at an approved hospital. With the 
completion of this work and satisfactorily passing the examination 
given by the Registry of Medical Technologists, the student will be 
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Armstrong State College cooperates with Memorial Hospital of 
Chatham County in giving a B.S. degree with a major in Medical 
Technology. This program has been approved by the Council on 
Medical Education of the American Medical Association and by the 
Board of Schools of Medical Technology of the American Society of 
Clinical Pathologists. 



•Whether or not a student will be placed in beginning classes of shorthand or 
tv pi n g w 'll depend upon previous training in those subjects. 

88 



The Coordinate] <>i this degree program it Dr. L. B. Davenport, 
Jr., Head oi the Department ol Biol< 

V. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN social WELFARE 
(See; Head ol Department ol Psychology and Sociology for 
information regarding this degree.) 

VI. ASSOCIATE IN \R IS IN NURSING 

For the two-year (seven quarters) program ol Associate in Arts 
in Nursing, the studem must complete the curriculum of 55 quarter 
hours in academic courses and 54 quarter hours ol professional clini- 
cal courses as listed under the Department of Nursing. 

This program provides the student with the opportunity to obtain 
a general education and to study nursing at the college level. Grad- 
uates arc eligible to take the State Examination for licensure to prac- 
tice as registered nurses. 

The curriculum is approved by the Georgia State Board of Nurs- 
ing Examiners and is fully accredited by the National League for 
Nursing. 

VII. DENTAL HYGIENE 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN DENTAL HYGIENE 

For the two-year (seven quarters) program for the Associate 
in Science Dgeree in Dental Hygiene the student mtist complete 
a curriculum of 55 quarter hours in academic courses and 53 quarter 
hours in professional dental hygiene courses. The purpose of this 
course of study is to meet the increasing need for young women 
educated in this rapidly growing and important health profession. 
Dental hygienists are in demand to provide dental health services in 
private dental offices, civil service positions, industry, and various 
public health fields. They practice under the supervision of a dentist 
and must pass a state board examination for licensure. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION 

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Dental Hygiene Education can 
be earned by an additional two years (six quarters) of study. This 
curriculum of 90 quarter hours is designed ta prepare dental hy- 
gienists for careers in teaching in schools of dental hygiene. 

VIII. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS IN POLICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

Armstrong State College provides professional education to pre- 
pare students for careers in many areas in the administration of 
criminal justice. The progarm is offered in cooperation with selected 

89 



public and private agencies to promote service and research. Since 
the police are charged with the responsibility for crime prevention, 
protection of life and property, and assuring the functions of a demo- 
cratic free society, it is imperative that students going into law enforce- 
ment be prepared to meet these obligations. 

A strong liberal arts emphasis has been developed in the program 
enabling the student to meet new and demanding requirements of 
policing needs. A list of courses comprising the curriculum has been 
included elsewhere in this bulletin giving the student information on 
the suggested sequence. 

Specific courses in police administration are open to all students 
as electives. Students who plan to follow careers in social work, law, 
journalism, or special education may find police administration in- 
teresting and useful. Non-majors should consult with their faculty 
advisor before election of these courses. 

For those students seeking a baccalaureate degree, provisions 
have been made at Armstrong State College for transfer of the police 
administration credits into the political science curriculum without 
loss of credit. Students who plan to graduate with a degree in politi- 
cal science should contact the Head of that department soon after entering 
college. 

IX. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 
„ For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts a student must com- 
plete the last 45 quarter hours of course work in this program at Arm- 
strong State College. The program is designed to provide a substantial 
liberal education as a base for upper-division specialization. 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. History 114, 115 10 

3. One of the folowing sequences of two courses: 10 

Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 111, 112 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 

4. Mathematics 100 or 105 5 

5. Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Psychology 101 
Sociology 201 
U.S. History 251* 252* 



♦If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted by 
examination in order to raeel the state requirement for graduation (see pa^e 56) , 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

90 



6. One ot the following courses: 5 

Musu 200 
An 200 
Philosophy 201 

7. Physical Education III. 111'. 113, and three 200 courses 6 
s. Electives ' 30 



96 

COMPLI II [.1ST OF MAJOR PROGRAMS — FOUR 
YEAR AND TWO YEAR DEGREES 

1. Bachelor of Arts with a major in English. 

2. Bacheloi oJ Arts with a major in English and requirements 
for secondary certification. 

3. Bachelor of Arts with a major in History. 

4. Bachelor of Arts with a major in History and requirements 
for a secondary certification. 

5. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Political Science. 
(>. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Psychology. 

7. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music. 

8. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music and requirements 
for secondary certification. 

9. Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology. 

10. Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology and requirements 
for secondary certification. 

11. Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry. 

12. Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and require- 
ments for secondary certification. 

13. Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics. 

14. Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics and require- 
ments for secondary certification. 

15. Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. 

16. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Ac- 
counting. 

17. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Eco- 
nomics. 

18. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Man- 
agement — Marketing. 

19. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Busi- 
ness Education. 

20. Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

21. Associate in Arts. 



*If a student plans to continue work in the future toward a Bachelor's degree, he 
should select courses that will meet the listed requirements of a Bachelor's degree 
program. 

91 



22. Associate in Arts in Nursing. 

Vsscoiate in Science in Dental Hygiene. 
21. Bachelor ol Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

25. Associate in Arts in Police Administration. 

26. Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in Speech 

Correction. 

27. Bachelor of Arts with a major in French. 

28. Bachelor of Aits in Social Welfare. 

2!). Bachelor ol Business Administration with a major in Finance. 




!___ 




k A 



92 



125 

101 

102 



[X. Departmental Course 
Offerings and Requirements 
For Majors 

Page 

Vnthropolog) ' ' ' 

Am 

Biology 

Botany 

Business Administration 1 () 1 

Business Education ■-- l (l< ' 

Chemistry - ----- 1!1 

Chinese - - -- -- 128 

Dental Hygiene - • 96 

Economics — — — 109 

Education H6 

Engineering Graphic s 1 140 

English 121 

Entomology 103 

French - - 1 28 

Geography 136 

German ■ 1 30 

Health 98 

Hebrew 131 

History 133 

Library Science 119 

Mathematics 139 

Music 124 

Nursing 94 

Nutrition 96 

Philosophy 136 

Physical Education 143 

Physical Science 114 

Physics 1 15 

Police Administration 145 

Political Science 137 

Psychology 146 

Social Welfare „ 149 

Sociology 146 

Spanish 131 

Speech 12-1 

Speech Correction 1 19 

Zoology 103 



Armstrong State College reserves the right to (1) withdraw 
any course for which less than ten students register, (2) limit the 
enrollment in any course or class section, (3) fix the time of meet- 
ing ol all classes and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses 
as demand and faculty warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where \ 
the same or similar courses have been presented for admission from • 
hruh school. * 



Where two or more courses are listed under one description no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed, 
for example: French 101-102-103 

Alter each course name, there are three numbers in parenthesis. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the sec- 
ond, the number of hours ol laboratory; and the third, the number 
of quarter hours of credit the course carries. For example: Biology 
101 - General Biology (4-3-5). 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are generally planned for the fresh- 
man level; courses numbered 200 to 299. for the sophomore level; 400- 
499, for the senior level. 

DEPARTMENT OF ALLIED HEALTH SERVICES 

NURSING 

Assoc. Professor Doris Bates. R.X. Director; Rose Marie Blase, R.N., 
Asst. Director., Anne Mayer, R.N., Assistant Professor 

Instructors: Christine Hamilton, R.X.; Nancy Duffy, R.N.; Carol Sutton, 
R.X.; Dorothy Bell, R.N. 

The Associate in Arts Degree Program in Nursing provides the 
student with the opportunity to obtain a general education and to 
study nursing at the college level. Graduates are eligible to take the 
State Examination for licensure to practice as registered nurses. 

The nursing educational program is developed by proceeding from 
simple to complex situations in nursing which evolve from basic con- 
cepts fundamental to the total needs ol the individual. 

Student nurses participate in nursing laboratory experiences at 
Memorial Medical Center, Candler General Hospital Complex. St. 
Joseph's Hospital, and other community agencies. Students are assigned 
to the clinical area and are responsible lor providing their own trans- 
portation. 

Students who enroll in this program have opportunities for per- 
sonal, intellectual, and socio-ethical development, as well as having 
the personal satislaction ol becoming a member of a professional group 
which has unlimited opportunities alter graduation. 

9± 



FRESHM \\ COURS1 SOPHOMOR1 ( OURS! 

On. His. On. His. 

English 101 5 Political Science MS* 5 

Physical Science 108, 109, 110 15 Nursing 201 B 

Nursing 101 6 History 251 f or l ; :>2 # 5 

Psychology 101 5 Nursing 202 8 

Nursing 102 6 P. E. 208 1 

Psycholog) 301 oi 305 5 Genera] Elective 5 

Nursing 103 8 Nursing 203 10 

Nutrition 105 5 P.E. 113 1 

Nursing 104 8 P.E. 204 1 

Sociology 201 5 

Course Offerings — Freshman 
NURSING 101 — Fundamentals of Nursing I. - Fall Quarter. 

NURSING 10IL — Selected Laboratory Experiences. (5-3-6) 

The underlying philosophy of this introductory course is that the 
logical approach to the care of the sick is through a developmental 
path based on a patient's typical day. Sound principles of profes- 
sional ethics and the historical development of the nursing profes- 
sion are correlated. Students are given opportunity to develop begin- 
ning nursing skills, to understand and apply basic principles, and to 
identify nursing care needs of individual patients. Clinical experience 
in community hospitals is given under supervision. 
NURSING 102 — and Selected Laboratory Experiences — 

Fundamentals of Nursing II - Winter Quarter (4-6-6) 
Prerequisite: Nursing 101 

This course is a continuation of Fundamentals of Nursing. The stu- 
dents develop more complicated nursing skills and an awareness of 
the inter-relatedness of medical-surgical nursing problems, and the 
sociological, physiological, and psychological needs of the patients. 
The problem - solving technique is introduced. Selected Nursing 
Practice is provided in applying the principles of comprehensive nurs- 
ing care to patients in the hospital. 
NURSING 103 and 104 — and Selected Laboratory Experiences — 

Spring & Summer Qtrs. 

Nursing in Maternal and Child Health 

Nursing I and II (5-9-8) , (5-9-8) 

Prerequisite: Nursing 102 

In the Maternal and Child Health Nursing sequence the framework 
of knowledge, needed for the study of the nursing needs of the in- 
dividual and family which will be developed through the curri- 
culum, is established. The course is designed to assist the student in 



•If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted 
b\ examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 56) . 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

95 



the application of appropriate nursing principles, beginning with con- 
ception, the prenatal period, labor and delivery, the care and develop- 
ment of the newborn, the infant, and child, and the effect ot illness during 
the growing years from birth to adolescence. 

Laboratory experience is planned selectively and utilizes agencies and 
facilities concerned with mothers, babies, children, and their famiies. 
NUTRITION 105 — Fundamentals of Nutrition (5-0-5) Summer 
Quarter. 

A survey of the fundamentals of nutrition and the factors influencing 
the ability of the individual and family to secure and maintain optimal 
nutritional status. 

Course Offerings — Sophomore 
NURSING 201 and 202 — and Selected Laboratory Experiences — Fall 
& Winter Quarters. 

Nursing in Physical and Mental 

Illness I and II (5-9-8), (5-9-8) 

Prerequisite: Nursing 103 and 104 

The physical and mental illness sequence is an integrated study of the 
typical emotional and physical problems in tempting the human life 
cycle from adolescence, through middle age, to senescence and death. 
Laboraotry experiences in community agencies and hospital facilities 
are provided each student to reinforce theoretical learning. 
NURSING 20j — and Selected Laboratory Experiences — Spring 
Quarter. 

Advanced Nursing Problems (5-15-10) 
Prerequisite: Nursing 202 

This course is a continuation of Nursing 201 and 202. Content is cor- 
related to strengthen knowledge and skills needed by the present day be- 
ginning nurse in giving physical care and psychological support to pa- 
tients. Current trends in nursing are explored, as well as responsibi- 
ties, both legal and professional. Laboratory experiences are designed to 
enhance breadth and depth of knowledge in selected clinical areas. 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE 

Associate Professor, Doris Bates, R.D.H., Director; 

Robert 1. Phillips, I). M. D.. Supervising Dentist 

Instructors: Bettv C. Dallas, R.D.H. and Sallv Blitch, R.D.H. 

The curriculum in dental hygiene at Armstrong State College was 
established in the fall of 1968. 

The pu/pose was and is to meet the ever-increasing need for young 
women educated in this rapidly growing and important health profession. 
Dental hy^ienists are in demand to provide dental health services m 
private dental offices, civil service positions, school programs, and var- 
ious public health fieids. The\ practice under the supervision o[ :i 
dentist arid must pass a state board examination foi licensure. 

9(3 



f Admission ol this two-yeai program is limited to ">" in each 
null nts i •;: )li .n tlic l.il' ol eai h year. 
Application !<>i admission should be completed bj Jim- 1 Eoi tltc 
(all quarter, including .1 transcript <>l course \\<>ik up to thai date. A 
loiniilcu uanscripi shall be submitted as soon as possible thereafter. 

Dl \ 1 AL HYGI1 M 
1 DU< \ l ION 



GEN1 R \l. l Die \ l ION 



Cr 



hysical Science 108, I" 1 -'. 

110 

, 'unit ion lit") 
•sychology 1 1 
nglish 101 
ociology 201 
Political Science 1 13 
kith 107 
peech 228 
History 251 or 252 
•P.E. 204 



15 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
1 



Cr. 
Denial Hygiene 101 and 102 
Dental Hygiene 103 2 

Dental Hygiene 104 and 105 3-4 
Dental Hygiene 106 2 

Dental Hygiene 201 3 

Dental Hygiene 202 and 203 6-6 
Dental Hygiene 204 6 

Dental Hygiene 205 2 

Dental Hygiene 206 4 

Dental Hygiene 207 2 



Dental Hygiene 208 
Dental Hygiene 209 



56 



41 plus 13 equal 54 



Course Offerings 

DENTAL HYGIENE 101 and 102 — Dental Anatomy and Oral His- 
tology I and II (4-2-5), (1-4-3) Fall & Winter Quarters. 

A developmental study of the embryonic growth of the oral cavity, the 

primary tissues and histology of the teeth, the calcification, eruption, 

anatomy, and function of the human dentition and supporting structures. 

For Dental Hygiene students only. 

Laboratory — Identification, sketching, cross sectioning and carving of 

individual teeth. Correlated with lectures. For Dental Hygiene students 

only. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 103 — Orientation to Fields of Denistry and 
Dental Hygiene (2-0-2) Winter Quarter. 
The historical background ot the dental hygiene movement and an 

introduction ot the profession of denistry, its fields of specialization and 

the role of the dental hygienists, with respect to her membership on 

a dental health team. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 104 - 105 — Clinical Dental Hygiene I and II 
(1-4-3) , (2-4-4) Spring & Summer Quarters. 



•If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted 
In examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 56) . 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to elective*. 

••Required by Council on Dental Education, American Dental Association. 



97 



Lectures anu ueiiiuiisiiauuiis in ine iccuiiiquc ui icinuwng stains anu 

deposits from the exposed surfaces of the teeth. Work is introduced by 
practice on manikins, Alter the student has mistered the technique, she 
receives clinical experience in oral prophylaxes on children and adults, 
mouth inspection, and charting in the dental hygiene clinic. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 106 — Pharmacology and Anesthesiology (2-0-2) 

Spring Quarter. 
The study of drugs and anesthetics with special consideration given to 
those used in the dental office. This study is to acquaint the student 
with the origin of these drugs and anesthetics, their physical and chemi- 
cal properties, modes of administration, and eltects upon the bodv systems. 
NUTRITION 105 — Fundamentals ol Nutrition (5-0-5) Summer 

Quarter. 
A survey of the fundamentals of nutrition and the factors influencing 
the ability of the individual and family to secure and maintain optional 
nutritional status. 
HEALTH 107 — Personal and Community Health (5-0-5) Summer 

Quarter. 
The course includes information for protection and promotion of in- 
dividual and public health. Emphasis is given to personal hygiene, men- 
tal health, parenthood, disease prevention, and community organizations 
for maintaining and improving health of self and society. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 201 — General and Oral Pathology (3-0-3) 

Fall Ouarter. 
The principles of general pathology in relationship to the diseases of 
the teeth, soft tissues, and supporting structures of the oral cavity. The 
importance of early recognition of abnormal conditions in the mouth by 
the hygienist is emphasized. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 202 - 203 — Clinical Dental Hygiene III and IV 

(2-8-6) . (2-8-6) Fall & Winter Quarters. 
Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 104 and 105. A continuation of 104 and 
105. The hygienist further learns and applies the principles of preven- 
tive dental hvgiene and oral prophylaxis techniques on patients in the 
clinic under supervision. Conference time is used for further teaching 
student evaluation, discussion of common problems and situations en 
countered in the clinical laboratory. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 204 — Clinical Dental Hvgiene Y (2-8-6) Sprinc 

Quarter. 
Prerequisite: 202, 203, and 207 — Co-requisite 208. The student con 
tinues to learn and apply the principles of preventive dental hygiene 
techniques on adult patients in the clinic under supervision. Confer 
ence time covers laws governing dental hygiene practice, professiona 
ethics, areas of employment, office procedures, and discussion of situa 
tions encountered in clinical laboratory and externship experience. 
DENIAL HYGIENE 203 — Dental Health Education (2-0-2) Fal 

Quarter. 

98 



demonstrations and practical applications <>l m idem methods <>l dental 
ealth education, reaching techniques, visual aids, materials, and op- 
ortunities foi teaching are covered. 

)l \ l \l. HYG1EN] 206 Dental Roentgenology and X-raj Labora- 
tory (2-4-4) Wintei Quarter. 

v series ol lectures and demonstrations on the applications <>i roentgen 
.i\s for dental diagnostic purposes. Includes the electrophysics ol the 
pparatus, positioning ol the films, angulation ol the machine, and de- 
moping processes. 



)1 \ IAI. HYGIENI 207 — Dental Materials and Assisting Procedures 
(1-2-2) Winter Quarter. 

>.inu concepts of dental assisting, laboratory procedures, and dental 
Materials used commonly and the role of the dental hygienist. Field trips 
o local commercial dental laboratories and the local dental supply 
louses. 

)1 \TAL HYGIENE 208 — Externship (0-6-3) Spring Quarter. 
Supervised learning experiences in selected dental offices and field 
rips to local community dental agencies and specialized dental offices 
n order to amplify formal teaching. 

)EMAL HYGIENE 209 — Dental Public Health and Preventive 
Dentistry (3-0-3) Spring Quarter. 

\ comprehensive overview of health programs with reference to the 
leeds of the community. Particular attention is given to methods of 
prevention and control of dental disease, the promotion of dental health, 
md opportunities for participation by the dental hygienist. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION 

An additional two years of study (six quarters) are offered to 
graduates of accredited Associate Degree Dental Hygiene programs who 
are registered Dental Hygienists. The enrollment is limited to those 
applicants with a minimum of one year of professional experience who 
wish to prepare themselves for a second career in Dental Hygiene Edu- 
cation. 

In addition to courses listed for Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 
degree, the following courses must be completed. 



99 



English 102 




5 


Math - Any 10 qtr. 


hr. 




sequence 




10 


History 114 




5 


History 1 15 




5 


Philosophy 201 




5 


Education 301 




5 


Education 303 




5 


Psychology 301 




5 


Psychology 305 




5 


Education 437 
Electives 




5 

55 
15 



uentai .Hygiene 401 5 

Dental Hygiene 402 5 

Dental Hygiene 403 5 

Dental Hygiene 404 5 



20 



70 

DENTAL HYGIENE 401 — Practicum in Dental Hygiene Education I 

(1-8-5) Offered on Demand. 
An introductory field experience in the college dental hygiene clinic, 
with emphasis on observation, individual and small group teaching, and 
teacher aide work. The professional course for majors in Dental Hygiene 
Education. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 402 — Practicum in Dental Hygiene Education II 

(1-8-5) Offered on Demand. 

A continuation of Dental Hygiene 401. Problems common to beginning 
dental hygiene teachers, practices and procedures designed to accomplish 
program objectives, the establishment and organization of content, 
methods of clinical evaluation and supervision in the dental hygiene 
clinic. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 403 — Practicum in Dental Hygiene Education III 

(1-8-5) Offered on Demand. 

An advanced field experience, designed to assist the student in the 
development of learning activities, teaching procedures, and the presen- 
tation of materials pertinent to dental hygiene education. The student 
will develop and teach selected units in the basic dental hygiene sequence. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 404 — Dental Hygiene Independent Study (5-0-5). 

Offered on Demand. 
Individual independent study and field work in an area of major in 
terest with special relevance to dental hygiene and future career objec 
tives. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology) 

ART 

(See listing under Department of Fine Arts) 

100 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professoi Leslie B. Davenport, fr., Head; Associate Professors 
Belu and Thorne; Assist. mi Professors Browei and Pingel 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

IN BIOLOGY 

The major in biology consists of Biology 101, 102, Botany 203, 
Sbolog) 204, and at Last io quarter hours credil in biology courses 
(botany, zoology, etc.) numbered 300 or above. In addition, biology 
ttajors must complete the course sequence in organic chemistry (15 
juai ter hours) . The course in General College Physics ( 15 quarter houi s) 
s strongl) recommended and should be considered essentia] Eor those 
.vho expect to continue the study of biology beyond the B. S. degree. 

Ever} student acquiring a major in biology must include in his 
Irogram the following courses: Biology 370; Biology 380; and Botany 
(380 or Zoology 390. 

Beginning students who have successfully completed strong courses 
in biology in high school are advised to take the examinations for 
advanced placement which are offered with the College Entrance Ex- 
aminations. Arrangements to take these tests may be made through the 
office of the Dean of Student Affairs. 

Course Offerings 

BIOLOGY 101 — Principles of Biology (4-3-5). Offered each 
quarter. Biological structure; the reproduction and development of 
organisms; the physical and chemical organization of protoplasm and 
cells. Prerequisite: none. 

BIOLOGY 102 — Principles of Biology (4-3-5). Offered each 
quarter. Biological function; bioenergetics of cells, cellular and organ- 
ismal physiology, genetics, differentiation, behavior, ecology, and evo- 
lution. Prerequisite: Biology 101. 

BIOLOGY 351 — Bacteriology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisites: 10 
hours of biological science, Chemistry 128-129. 

A survey of micro-organisms with special emphasis on bacteria and 
their relationships to man. 

BIOLOGY 352 — Mycology (3-4-5) . Offered on demand. Prere- 
quisite: Biology 351. 

A survey of the microscopic and macroscopic fungi common to 
the local geographic area. 

BIOLOGY 358 — Histological Technique. (0-10-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, 
staining, and mounting plant and animal materials for study. 

BIOLOGY 370 — Genetics (3-4-5) . Winter. Prerequisites: Biology 
101, 102. 

101 



An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

BIOLOGY 380 - General Ecology (3-4-5) . Spring. Prerequisites: 
Two upper division courses in biology (botany or zoology) . 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the 
welfare of man, co-ordinated with a study of populations and com- 
munities in the field. 

BIOLOGY 410 — Cellular Physiology (3-4-5) . Offered on demand. 
Prerequisites: At least third quarter junior status; two upper division 
courses in biology; and organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between micro- 
scopic anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, meta- 
bolism, and growth. 

BIOLOGY 440 — Cytology (2-6-5). Fall Odd Numbered Years. 
Prerequisite: Two senior division courses in biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differen- 
tiation, and reproduction. 

BIOLOGY 450 — Evolution (5-0-5) . Winter. Prerequisite: major 
in biology (at least 15 qtr. hrs. credit in upper division courses) . 

Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

BIOLOGY 490 — Problems in Biology (1-5 hours credit) . Offered 
on demand. Prerequisites: At least 20 hours credit in biology courses 
numbered 300 or above; a B average in biology courses and in overall 
work; consent of department head; agreement of staff member to super- \ 
vise work. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the 
department. Supervised research including literature search, field and/or 
laboratory investigation, and presentation of acceptable, written report 
of results. 

Credit will depend upon the work to be done. Both credit and 
proposed work must be approved in advance, in writing, by the faculty 
member to supervise the work and by the department head. 

BOTANY 203 — Survey of the Plant Kingdom. (3-4-5) . Spring. 
Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102.. 

Morphology and phylogeny of the divisions of the plant kingdom, 
with emphasis upon the evolution of the land flora. 

BOTANY 305 — Identification of Flowering Plants (0-10-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Botany 203. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local flora. 

BOTANY 323 — Plant Anatomy (0-10-5). Fall, even numbered 
years. Prerequisites: Botany 203. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems oi 
vascular plants, and a comparative study of the structure of roots 
stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. 

BOTANY 380 — Plant Physiology (3-4-5) . Summer. Prerequisites: 
Botany 203 and Organic Chemistry. 

102 



A mm \ t\ ol physiological processes occuring in economic plants 
and the conditions which affect these processes. 

hoiwy 125 Plant Morphology Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Botany 525. 

Comparative studies oi vascular pi. mis with emphasis on form, 
structure, reproduction, and evolutionar) relationships. 

ENTOMOLOGY SOI -Introductory Entomology (5-4-5) . Sprii 
Prerequisite: Zoology 204. 

An introduction to the study ol insects theii structure, identi- 
■cation, and biology. 

ZOOLOGY 204 Survey ol the Animal Kingdom. (5-4-5). Wintei 
Prerequisite: Biology 101 and i02. 

An evolutionary survey ol the major animal phyla. 

ZOOLOGY 208 — Structure and Function ol the Human Body. 
(5-0-5) . Prerequisite: Sophomore status. 

A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology, and 
physiology of the organ system by means of combined lectures and dem- 
onstrations. Credit for this course may not be applied toward a major 
in biology. 

ZOOLOGY 325 — Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. (3-4-5) . Pre- 
requisite: Zoology 204. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and na- 
tural history of the major invertebrate groups. 

ZOOLOGY 355 — Embryology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisites: Zool- 
ogy 204 or equivalent in another biological science. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used 
to illustrate the basic principles of developmental anatomy. 

ZOOLOGY 356 — Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 
(3-6-6) . Winter. Prerequisite: Zoology 204. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertibrates. 

ZOOLOGY 357 — Animal History (3-4-5) . Winter. Prerequisite: 
Zoology 204. 

A study of the tissues and their organization into organs and 
organ systems in animals. 

ZOOLOGY 372 — Parasitology (3-4-5) . Spring. Prerequisites: 
Zoology 204. 

A comparative study of the internal and external parasites of man 
and other animals. 

ZOOLOGY 390 — General Vertebrate Physiology (3-4-5). Fall. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 204 and organic chemistry. 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the veter- 
brates. 

ZOOLOGY 425 — Marine Invertebrate Zoology (2-6-5). Prere- 
quisite: Zoology 325, or permission of instructor and department head. 

103 



Studies in the identification and ecologic distribution of marine 
invertebrates as exemplified by collection from the southeastern coastal 
region. 

ZOOLOGY -129 — Endocrinology (4-4-5) . Offered on demand. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 390 and one other senior division course in biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism 
and reproductive cycles. 

ZOOLOGY 435 — Comparative Physiology (3-4-5) . Spring. Prere- 
quisites: Zoology 204, and Chemistry 341, 342, and 343. 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ 
systems involved in the maintenance of homestasis under varying 
conditions within normal habitats and of in vitro reactions of tissues 
and systems under laboratory conditions. 

BOTANY 

(See listing .mder Department of Biology) 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Orange Hall Head,; Professors Davis and Bhatia; Associate 
Professors Morgan and Squires; Assistant Professors DeCastro, Johns, 
LaBurtis and Pearce. 

Major Concentrations. (For Business Education, see listings un- 
der Teacher Education) . Xo student will be allowed to take upper 
division courses unless he has a minimum grade of C in all prere- 
quisite courses in his major field. An average of at least 2.0 in his major 
courses will be a requirement for graduation. 

1. ACCOUNTING 

B.A. 301, 302 Intermediate Accounting I, II, and four of the 

following: 
B.A. 329 Cost Accounting I 
B.A. 330 Cost Accounting II 
B.A. 436 Income Taxation I 
B.A. 437 Income Taxation II 
B.A. 440 Accounting Systems 
B.A. 450 Auditing Principles 
B.A. 455 Advanced Accounting 

2. ECONOMICS 

Econ 401 Price and Income Theorv 

J 
Econ 435 Seminar on Contemporary Economic Problems, and 

four of the following: 

Econ 326 Economic History $4 the United States 

Econ 335 Public Finance 

Econ 345 Economic Development 

Econ 350 Transportation Economics 

Econ 405 Government and Business 

Econ 410 International Trade 

104 



icon ijn Comparative Economic Systemi 

icon 122 Business Fluctuations! Macroeconomici 

Econ i:'»l Investments 

l ( on 1 15 [ndependenl Study 

$. \I \\ \(.l Ml \ l-\l \RK1 1 INC 

__ - K. A. |<). r ) Business l ) oli(\ ] and Eive oi the following: 

B.A. 508 Business Law II 

B A. 515 Business Communications 

B.A. 829 "i B A 501 Cost or Intermediate Accounting I 
^m 11. A. :>75 Personnel Administration *Pf ll^* 

B.A. Ill Marketing Management 

B.A. 412 Marketing Research 

B.A. 125 Managerial Accounting 

B.A. 460 Production Planning and Control 

B.A. 462 Human Relations in Industry 

Econ. 350 Tnui^ijQjlaJJI2ILJ^_" Qr Qics 

Tcon. 405 Government and Business 

Psyc. 320 Industrial Psychology 

** (B.A. 304) Salesmanship and Sales Management 
** (B.A. 306) Retailing 
** (B.A. 403) Advertising 
4) . FINANCE 

B.A. 461 Corporate Financial Policy or 

IB. A. 456 Business Policy 
B.A. 425 Managerial Accounting or 
B.A. 301 Intermediate Accounting or 
B.A. 329 Cost Accounting I 
Four of the following: 
B.A. 308 Business Law 
B.A. 404 Real Estate 
* (B.A. 307) Principles of Insurance 
B.A. 436 Income Taxation I 

kB.A. 437 Income Taxation II 
Economics 335 Public Finance 
Economics 422 Business Fluctuations 
Economics 431 Investments 

Course Offerings 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 200 — Survey of Business (5-0- 
5) . Fall, Spring, Summer. 

A first course in business for Business Administration majors or 
an elective for non-majors who wish to gain an understanding of the 

•This course is offered at Savannah State College and may be taken as a part of 
the major concentration in Finance for the degree of BJ3. A. 

**These courses offered at Savannah State College may be taken by students wishing 
a more specialized concentration in marketing for the degree of B.B.A. 

105 



functioning ol business enterprises in our capitalistic system. The course 
will provide a basic familiarity with: (a) the economic, social, and 
political environment in which business enterprises operate, and (b) 
the tools and managerial skills used in business decision-making in the 
various functional areas such as organization, management, financing, 
marketing, production and personnel. (Not open to upper-division 
business majors who have already taken 300-level work) 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 205 — Data Processing (5-0-5). 
Winter. A basic stud) of the principles and procedures of processing 
data by means ol automatic data processing machines. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 211 — Introductory Accounting 

I. (5-0-5) . Fall, Winter, Spring. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures 
of accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working 
papers, accounting statements, controlling accounts, special journals, 
partnerships and corporations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 212 — Inrtoductory Accounting 

II. (5-0-5) . Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 211. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such I 
as departmental operations, manufacturing accounts, the analysis of ' 
financial statements, accounting aids to management, statement of ap- 
plication of funds. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 301 — Intermediate Accounting 

I. (5-0-5) . Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring an ap- 
plication of accounting theorv. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 302 — Intermediate Accounting 

II. (5-0-5) . Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 301. 

A continuation of Business Administration 301, emphasizing the 
theories of valuation of lixed assets and liability accounts, the applica- 1 
tion of these, and the interpretation of financial statements prepared! 
on the basis of these theories. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 307 — Business Law I. (5-0-5). 
Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects: Contracts, offer and acceptance, consideration, rights of third ( 
parties and discharge; agency, liabilities of principal and agent; negoti- ! 
ability, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 308 — Business Law II. (5-0-5) I 
Winter. 

The law applicable to the following subjects: partnership forma 
tion, powers and liabilities of partners; corporation, formation, powers 
rights of security holders; sales, vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 315 — Business Communications 
(5-0-5) . Fall, Winter. 

Principles of effective business communications, application o 

106 



mat principles i<> business and technical report writing, correspondence, 
bd othei information media. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 320 Business Finance. (5-0-5). 
Fall. Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

I lu- interna] and externa] sources ol Financing for business enter- 
prises; acquisition and management »>i Long-term and shorter-term funds; 
t\|>cs ol securities; equit) and debi instruments; problems <>t financial 
management. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 329 — Cost Accounting I. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Methods ol determining and distributing costs in manufacturing, 
Deluding job ordei and process methods. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 330 — Cost Accounting II. 
(5-0-5) . Summer. Prerequisite: Business Administration 32 ( .>. 

Standard cost procedures; budgeting; distribution costs and special 
cost problems. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 340 — Principles of marketing. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or Eco- 
nomics 202. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 360 — Principles of Manage- 
ment. (5-0-5) . Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 
or 212. 

The basic principles of management applicable to all forms of 
business and to all levels of supervision; the functions of planning, 
organizing, directing, and controlling as components of the manage- 
ment process. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 375 — Personnel Administration. 
(5-0-5) . Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or Eco- 
nomics 202. 

Personnel administration as a staff function. Employment stand- 
ards, training, safety and health, employee services and industrial re- 
lations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 101 — Real Estate (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisites: B. A. 320 or B. A. 425, or B. A. 340 and B. A. 360. 

Principles and practices concerned with the economic, financial, 
managerial, and marketing aspects of commercial and industrial real 
estate planning and utilization. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 411 — Marketing Management 
(5-0-5) . Fall. Prerequisites: Business Administration 340, and 360. Man- 
agement of marketing organizations, with emphasis on planning, organ- 
izing and controlling the marketing organization; internal and external 
communications; marketing management decision-making. 

107 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 412 — Marketing Research 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisites: Business Administration 340, Math 211. 
Sampling, survey, experimental and other research techniques for de- 
termining customer preferences and market potenitals. Interpretation 
and presentation of research findings for management decision making. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 425 — Managerial Accounting. 
(5-0-5) . Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. Emphasizes 
theon and practice of accounting from the standpoint of those who 
direct business operations and shape business policy. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 436 — Income Taxation I. 
(5-0-5) . Spring, Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. A study 
of federal income tax law and regulations; the income tax returns of I 
individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 437 — Income Taxation II. 
(5-0-5) . Summer. Prerequisite: Business Administration 436 or consent . 
of instructor. A continuation of Business Administration 436 with . 
emphasis on corporations and fiduciary returns, gift taxes, and estate 
taxes. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 440 — Accounting Systems. (5-1 
0-5) . Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Business Administration 302. i 
The design and installation of appropriate accounting systems in ac- 1 
cordance with the needs of the business being serviced. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 450 — Auditing Principles.! 
(5-0-5) . Spring.Prerequisite: Business Administraiton 302. The principles 
of adults and financial verifications, standards of field work, preparation ! 
of audit working papers, writing audit reports, auditing ethics 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 455 — Advanced Accounting. I 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: B.A. 301 and 302. Selected problems in 
accounting. Analysis and evaluation of methods used for organizing and 
solving special accounting problems. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460 — Production Planning and, j 
Control (5-0-5) . Fall. Prerequisites: Business Administration 360, Math 
211. Appreciation of the principles of production management is de- 
veloped through study of plant layout, inventory control, materials 
handling, production scheduling, quality control, and associated topics 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 461 — Corporate Financial Pol 
icy (5-0-5) . Spring. Prerequisites: B. A. 320 and Senior Status. 

Analysis of financial problems, practices, policies, and decision-mak- 
ing rules of corporations. This course should be taken, when possible 
in the student's last quarter before graduation. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 462 — Human Relations in In 
dustry. (-0-5) . Winter. Prerequisites: Business Administration 360. Busi 
ness Administration 375 and Psychology 101 are desirable. A study o. 
the process of integrating people into the work situation so that they an 
motivated to work together harmoniously, productively, and with eco 
nomic, psychological and social satisfaction. 

108 



BUSlNl ss admims i r \ i io\ Business Policy. C.-0-5) . 

winter, Spring. 1 lie formation and application oi business policy l>\ 
top management. Emphasis is on decision-making. 

BUSINESS i !)('( \ I ION 

BUSINESS EDUCATION MM Beginning Typing (0-5-2) Fall. 
I his course consists ol Introductory instruction in the technical 
features Ami care of tin- machine, position, fingering, proper techni- 
que and master) of the keyboard, continuing with speed develop- 
ment, and instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabula- 
tions, term papers. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 105 — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Business Education 101 or equivalent. 

In this course emphasis is placed on speed building and accuracy. 
Special typing problems such as business letters, minutes, notices, 
stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 106 — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Business Education 105 or equivalent. 

A course in the acquisition of speed and accuracy. Includes various 
legal forms and papers, manuscripts and business papers. Most of the 
student's work is done on a production timing basis. An average of 
60 wards a minute is attained. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 111 — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-3). 
Fall. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading dicta- 
tion and transcription from studied material. A dictation speed of 65 
iwords a minute is attained. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 112 — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-3). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Business Education 111 or equivalent. 

Continuing development of shorthand skill. Students entering 
directly into this course must have a knowledge of basic brief forms 
and the fundamentals of beginning Gregg Shorthand. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 113 — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-3). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Business Education 112. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of 100 words a minute. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 212 — Office Machines (3-2-5). Spring. 

The lecture and laboatory periods are devoted to the achievement 
of skill in the use of various office machines, such as adding-listing, 
calculating, ke\ punching, dictating, duplicating, and reproducing. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 213 — Office Procedures (5-0-5) . Spring. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 112 or permission of instructor. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as possible, 
including use of various machines, practical problems dealing with 
typing, iiling, and office courtesy. 






109 



ECONOMICS 

ECONOMICS 201 — Principles of Economics I. (5-0-5). Fall, 
Winter, Spring. A siucU of the principles underlying the economic- 
institutions of the present time and their application to economic 
problems. Aggregative or macroecomics is emphasized. 

ECONOMICS 202 — Principles of Economics II. (5-0-5). Winter, 
Spring, Summer. 

Microeconomics, with emphasis on the theory of prices and fac- 
tor shares. If a student plans to take only one economics course, Eco- 
nomics 201 or Economics 326 would be more suitable than Economics ] 
2C2. 

ECONOMICS 311 — Quantitative Methods (5-0-5). Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Math 211. 

Applications of statistics and other qualitative techniques to 
decision making in business and economics. 

ECONOMICS 326 — Economic History of the United States. (5- 
0-5) .Offered on demand. 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on 
the period since 1860, and including developments in agriculture, in- 
dustry, labor, transportation, and finance. 

ECONOMICS 327 — Money and banking. (5-0-5). Fall, Spring. • 
Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

Monetary theory, banking theory and practice, central bank con- 
trols, other financial institutions, credit flows, monetary policies to 
achieve desired economic efforts. 

ECONOMICS 331 — Labor and Industrial Relations. (5-0-5). 
Winter, Summer. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

The development and structure of the labor movement in the 
United States; the principles of wage determination; collective bargain- 
ing; and public policy toward labor unions. 

ECONOMICS 335 — Public Finance. (5-0-5) . Fall, Summer. Prere- 
quisite: Economics 201. 

The economic effects of governmental taxation, expenditures, 
and public debt management. The principal sources of revenue and 
types of expenditures at the federal, state, and local levels. The proper 
scope of government and issues of fairness in taxation. 

ECONOMICS 345 — Economic Development. (5-0-5) . Alternate 
winters. Prerequisite: Economics 202. The nature and cause of econo- 
mic stagnation in developing nations of the world, urgent need for their 
economic development, theory ot economic growth, ways of fostering 
development, and balanced growth and industrialization. 

ECONOMICS 350 — Transportation Economics. (5-0-5) . Winter 
Prerequisite: Economics 202. The economic aspects of transportation; 
significant developments in the fields of highway transport, water 

110 



transport, and ail transport, and in regulatory policy concerning the 

transpoi union industi y. 

ECONOMICS 101 Price and Income Theory. (5-0-5) . Winter. 
Prerequisite: Economics 202, Economi< analysis, especially the theories 
of production, price determination, factoi shares, income distribution 

and determination. 

ECONOMICS -105 - Government and Business. (5-0-5). Fall. 
prerequisite: upper-division stains, rhe effects of publu policies upon 
business and industry, with emphasis on anti-trust, taxation, regulatory, 
and defense polit its. 

ECONOMICS 410 — International Trade. (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: Economics 202. Export-import trade, emphasizing 
exchange techniques, balance ol trade and payments accounts, and the 
tbeorv of international specialization and exchange, the relationship 
of international transactions to national income. 

ECONOMICS 120 — Comparative Systems. (5-0-5). Alternate 
Springs. Prerequisite: Economics 202. Study of economic problems 
under different economic systems such as capitalism, socialism; and 
introduction to Marxian economic theory. 

ECONOMICS 422 — Business Fluctuations, Macroeconomics. 
(5-0-5) . Alternate years. Prerequisite: Economics 327 or Economics 202 
and consent of instructor. Causes of business fluctuations, means of 
prevention or control, policy proposals to maintain full employment 
and price stability. 

ECONOMICS 431 — Investments. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

The investment i asks in different investment media; selection of 
appropriate media in accordance with individual or institutional goals 
and risk-bearing capacity. Types of investments and securities. 

ECONOMICS 435 — Seminar on Contemporary Economic Prob- 
lems. (5-0-5) Alternate Springs. Prerequisites: Economics 201 and 202, 
and two 300-level economics courses. General problems of production, 
employment, and income, with special reference to the specific problems 
faced by the American economic system. 

ECONOMICS 445 — Independent Study. (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. Mature students of economics may be permitted to undertake 
special independent studies in one or more aspects of economics, under 
the supervision and guidance of a member of the faculty. Normally, the 
subject matter covered will parallel a bulletin-described course which 
is only infrequently offered. The student will meet frequently with his 
advisor and will be expected to submit reports in depth on his studies. 
Approval of the Advisor and the Department Head will be necessary 
for admittance to this course. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS 

Professor Fretwell G. Glider, Head; Associate Professors Brewer, 
Harris, Robbins, and Stratton; Assistant Professor Hill 

111 



Qtr. Hrs. 
I. Major Requirements 

A. Lower Division 

General Inorganic Chemistry (128, 129) 10 

Analytic Chemistry (Qual. 281; Quant. 282) 10 

B. Upper Division 

Organic Chemistry (341, 342, 343) 15 

Physical Chemistry (491, 492, 493) 12 

Electives (13 qtr. hrs.) from the following: 13 

Advanced Inorganic (421) 4 qtr. hrs. 

Qualitative Organic Analysis (448) 4 qtr. hrs. 

Instrumental Analysis (480) 5 qtr. hrs. 

Special Problems in Chemistry (498, 499) 1-5 qtr. hrs. 

Chemistry 431, 432, 441 3 qtr. hrs. ea. 
II. Requirements in Related Fields 

A. Mathematics through Calculus 5 

B. Physics 15 

Course Offerings 
CHEMISTRY 

CHEMISTRY 121, 122 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Prerequisite: 
Entrance Requirements. Offered each quarter. 

This course is designed for the student who is pursuing a non- 
science college major. It includes a study of the fundamental laws and 
theories of chemistry emphasizing the descriptive chemistry of the ele- 
ments and their relationships as shown in the Periodic Table. The 
course is a lecture laboratory study with minimum reliance on mathe- 
matics. 

CHEMISTRY 125 — Stoichiometry (1-2-2). Offered each quarter. 
The application of mathematics to freshman chemistry courses. The 
quantitative treatment of chemical reactions will be covered in detail 
and in practice sessions. Students will be assigned to this course according 
to their college entrance test results, or upon the recommendation of the 
faculty. 

CHEMISTRY 128, 129 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Prerequisite: 
College Algebra or equivalent. Offered each quarter. 

A study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry with 
a quantitative approach to the subject. This course is designed for 
the science major expecting detailed work in the modern concept of 
the atom, chemical bonding and a thorough treatment of the chemistry of 
particular elements, families and groups. The laboratory work includes 
an understanding of fundamental techniques as applied to beginning 
experiments and a study of properties and preparations. 

CHEMISTRY 281 Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5)1 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 129. Spring and Fall, 

112 






Theory and adequate laboratory practice in the analysis of com- 
mon cations and anions. 

CHEMISTRY 282 Quantitative Inorganu Analysis (2-9-5). 

Prerequisite: Chemistr) 281. Wintei and Summer. 

The fundamental theories and practice oi gravimetric and volu- 
metric analysis with an introduction to iiisiimncni.il analysis. 

CHEMISTRY 311 — Oceonography — Inorganu Chemistry (2- 
ii-l' . Fall. Prerequisite: Chemistry 282, or 841, or approved equivalent in 
physi< s or biology. 

The minerals of the ocean and ocean Floor; methods of analysis 
and collection; inter-relationship between the components; changes 
tbat ma) take place; clients of the components on bio-processes. 

CHEMISTRY 312 — Oceanography — Physical Chemistry (2-0-2). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Chemistry 282, or 341, or approved equivalent 
in physics or biology. 

The study of phases in the ocean; pH and its variations; redox 
potential and its variations; methods oi obtaining data: solubility 
effects and precipitation: correlation of data with bio-processes. 

CHEMISTRY 313 — Oceanography — Chemical Applications 
(2-0-2) . Spring. Prerequisite: Chemistry 282, or 341, or approved equiva- 
lent in physics or biology. 

Study of the mineral potential oi the ocean; description of the 
processes already operating; energy from the sea; ion-exchange processes; 
freshwater from the sea; biological concentrative effects; future pro- 
jections. 

CHEMISTRY 341, 432, 313 — Organic Chemistry (3-6-5). Fall, 
winter, spring. Prerequisite: Chemistry 129. 

Three quarter courses in the study of aliphatics, raomatic hydro- 
carbons and their derivatives. Includes the study of polyfunctional 
compounds, polynuclear hydrocarbons, carbohydrates, amino acids, 
heterocyclics and related compounds. The course will emphasize or- 
ganic reactions in terms of modern electronic theory. 

CHEMISTRY 350 — Chemical Literature (2-0-2) . Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 342 or consent of Department Head. Spring. 

A study of the use of the chemical library and the important 
journals, references, and information sources. Course will include in- 
struction in report writing. 

CHEMISTRY 360 — Biochemistry (5-0-5). Prerequisite. Chem- 
istry 343. Spring. 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular constituents and their 
metabolisms. 

CHEMISTRY 371 — Industrial Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Consent of Department Head. Winter. 

This course presents a study of inorganic chemical industries. It 

113 



deals with chemical processes and modem developments in these in- 
dustries. A survey of operations and economics is given. 

CHEMISTRY 372 - Industrial Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Consent of Department Head. Spring. 

This course covers the important organic chemical industries in 
the same manner as Chemistry 371. 

CHEMISTRY 3 12 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-3-4) . Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 282. Spring. 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tending to increase students' 
understanding of mechanisms of chemical reactions. Emphasizes the 
periodicity of elements. 

CHEMISTRY 431, 342 — Seminars (3-0-3) . Prerequisitents: Chem- 
istry 491, Chemistry 343, or Chemistry 421. Winter & Spring. 

Selected topics for group discussion. 

CHEMISTRY 441 — Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 343. Fall. 

A further study of important organic reactions emphasizing theo- 
ries of reaction mechanisms of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 448 — Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-6-4). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 343. Summer. 

Systematic approach to the identificaiton of organic compounds. 

CHEMISTRY 480 — Instrumental Analysis (2-9-5) . Prerequi- 
sites: Chemistry 282, 342. Winter and Summer. 

Includes study of principles involved in the operation and the 
laboratory use of special instruments for analysis. 

CHEMISTRY 491, 492, 493 — Physical Chemistry (3-3-4). Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 343, 282. Physics 213. Mathematics 104. 

Fundamental principles of physical chemistry including the study 
of solids, liquids, gases, thermochemistry, thermodynamics and solu- 
tions. The course will also cover a stud) of chemical equilibria, chem- 
ical kinetics, electrochemistry, colloids, quantum mechanics and nu- 
clear chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 498, 499 — Special Problems (Schedule and credit 
vary) . Prerequisites: Chemistry 493 and consent of Department Head. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the 
Department. Supervised research including literature search, labora- 
tory experimentation and presentation of results. Course credit will 
depend on problem. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 108, 109, 110 — Physical Science of Bio- 
Processes (4-3-5 for each course) . Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. 

A three quarter sequence which teaches the interrelationships ol 
content and application of essential principles from chemistry, physics, 
physiology, and microbiology. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE III — Physical Environment (5-0-5) . Winter. 

114 



Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. 

An elementary survey of the fundamentals of general physics. 
ncluding mechanics, heal and sound, electricity and magnetism, and 
oodern physics. Designed for non-science majors. Only simple mathe- 
oatics is utilized. Lectures, demonstrations, \isu;il aids and problems. 
<o credit is given to a student who lias completed a course in college 
>hysics. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 113 -■ Meteorology, Geology, Astronomy 
;5-0-f)) . Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. 

\ survey oi elementary meteorology, geology and astronomy, 
jjements ol weather and climate, their forecasting and possible modi- 
ication. Composition, structure, and history of the earth. Relative 
positions, motions and sizes of members of the solar system, our 
alaxy, and other regions ol the universe. Lectures, visual aids, fossils, 
oinerals and rocks, demonstrations and problems. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 111 — Physical Oceanography (5-0-5). 
iummer. Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. 

A survey of basic physical oceanography. Distribution of land and 
vater over the earth. Nature and relief of the sea floor. Physical and 
hemical properties of sea water. Propagation of sound and light in 
he ocean. Tides and currents, turbulence and waves, and air-sea energy 
•xchange. Instrumentation. Lectures, visual aids, charts, maps, and 
>roblems. 

PHYSICS 

PHYSICS 211 — Mechanics (4-2-5). Fall, Summer. Prerequisite: 
vlathematics 102. 

The first part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213 in general physics. 
Sasic classical physics, including mechanics, sound, and heat. Designed 
or non-science majors with apitude in mathematics below the level of 
alculus. Lectures, demonstrations, visual aids, problems and laboratory 
vork. 

PHYSICS 212 — Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (4-2-5). Win- 
er. Prerequisites: Mathematics 102 and Physics 211. 

The second part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213. Basic elec- 
ricity, magnetism, and geometrical optics. 

PHYSICS 213 — Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (4-2-5). 
Jpring. Prerequisites: Mathematics 102 and Physics 212. 

The last part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213. Continues the 
tudy of light from the viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes with 
he study of atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory work includes 
wo selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHYSICS 217 — Mechanics (5-3-6). Fall, Summer. Prerequisite: 
Vlathematics 104, or concurrently. 

The first part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219 in general 
physics. Basic classical physics, including mechanics, sound and heat. 

116 



Designed for science majors and engineering students. Lectures, demon- 
strations, visual aids, problems, and laboratory work. 

PHYSICS 218 — Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (5-3-6). Win- 
ter. Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 and Physics 217. 

The second part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219. Basic elec- 
tricity, magnetism, and geometrical optics. 

PHYSICS 219 — Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (5-3-6) . Spring. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 and Physics 218. 

The last part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219. Continues the 
study of light from the viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes 
with the study of atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory work includes 
two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHYSICS 301 — Physical Geology (2-0-2). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Physics 21 1 or consent of Instructor. 

Geologic history of the earth. Stratigraphy, volcanism, earth- 
quakes, and metamorphism. Lectures, visual aids, rocks and minerals, 
fossils, topographic and geologic maps, and problems. 

CHINESE 

(See listing under Department of Foreign Language) 

DENTAL HYGIENE 

(See listing under Department of Allied Health Services) 

ECONOMICS 

(See listing under Department of Business Administration) 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Professor William W. Stokes, Head; Assistant Professors, Boney, 
Newberry, Rundaken, and Ward. 

The purpose of the Department of Education is to coordinate the 
college-wide programs ol teacher education and to offer professional 
courses for the pre-service and in-service preparation of teachers. For 
specific requirements of the teacher education programs offered by the 
college, see pages 77-86. 

Course Offerings 

EDUCATION 203 — Orientation to Teaching. (5-0-5). Each 
quarter. 

The study of the status of education and of teaching as a profes- 
sion. The student engages in directed self-study and plans for the 
achievement of his professional goals. 

EDUCATION 301 — Child Development and the Educative Pro- 
cess. (2-6-5) . Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A study of the developmental learning characterstics of pupils 
in relation to ways in which the school environment may elicit further 

116 



development. Students attend seminars on campus and serve as junioi 
Professionals in selected elementary schools, En roll men I limited to 12 
ttudents pei section. Prerequisite: Education 203. 

EDUCATION 125 rhe reaching ol Reading. (5-0-5). Each 

quarter. 

The teaching ol reading including methods, techniques, and ma- 
■rials. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

EDUCATION 13 1 — Methods and Curriculum ol Elementary 



"( ience (5-0 5) . Wintei and Summer 



Provides prospective teachers with a better concepl ol the meaning 

ol science, processes foi translating this concepl into classroom practice, 
and a \ariet\ ol wa\s lor helping children learn science, with special 
emphasis on the kind ol inquiiv that engages them in the processes of 
discovery. 

EDUCATION 135 — Elementary School Curriculum. (5-0-5). 
Each quarter. 

The stud) ol existing instrumental programs and experiences in 
curriculum design. Directed observation. Prerequisite: Edu. 301 and 
Psy. 301, or permission ol the instructor, Corequisite: Edu. 436. 

EDUCATION 436 — Elementary School Methods. (5-0-5). Each 
quarter. 

The study and evaluation of teaching methods, materials, and 
equipment in the various teaching fields. Actual unit development 
in preparation for student teaching. Prequisite: Edu. 301 and Psy. 301, 
or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Edu. 435. 

EDUCATION 137 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
General. (5-0-5) . Fall, Winter. 

The study ol secondary school curriculum with emphasis upon 
materials and methods of teaching. Directed observation. Prerequisite: 
Admission to Teacher Education and Psy. 301. 

EDUCATION 438 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
Business Education. (5-0-5) . Fall. 

The study of secondary school business education curriculum 
with emphasis upon materials and methods of teaching business edu- 
cation. Directed observation. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Edu- 
cation and Psy. 301. 

EDUCATION 439 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
English. (5-0-5) . Fall, Spring. 

The study of secondary school English curriculum with emphasis 
upon materials and methods of teaching English. Directed observation. 
Prerequisite: Admission ot Teacher Education and Psy. 301. 

EDUCATION 440 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
Social Science. (5-0-5) . Fall, Spring. 

The stud) of secondary school social science curriculum with 
emphasis upon materials and methods of teaching social science. Directed 

117 



observation. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and Psy. 301 
EDUCATION 146, 447, -M8 — Student Teaching. (15 quarter 
hours) . Fall, Winter, Spi ing. 

Students are placed in selected schools for one quarter as full 
time student staff members. No additional credit hours may be earned 
while student teaching. Classroom teaching experiences and other staff 
responsibilities are jointly supervised by the college staff, supervising 
teachers and principals in the selected schools. Prerequisite: See Page 
77. 

RELATED PROFESSIONAL COURSES OFFERED 
IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

ART 320 — Art for the Elementary Teacher. (4-2-5) . 

A study of materials and methods for teaching art at the elemen 
tary school level. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

ENGLISH 331 — Children's Literature. (5-0-5). 

The literary genres usually emphasized in elementary and sec 
ondary schools will be studied. The primary purpose of this course will! 
be to consider how literature may both stimulate the child and catei 
to his interest as well. Secondary purposes will be the consideration ol 
critical techniques, methodology, and overall usefulness of material* 
studied. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

MATHEMATICS 350 — Basic Ideas of Arithmetic. (5-0-5) . Fall 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 105, 100, or 101, and at least sopho 
more standing. Mathematics majors will not receive credit for this course. 
This course is designed to give elementary teachers a clear understanding 
of the fundamental ideas oi arithmetic, and to acquaint them with cur- 
rent elementary school materials and methods. 

MATHEMATICS 351 — Basic Ideas of Geometry. (5-0-5) . Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 105, 100, or 101 and at least sophomore 
standing. Mathematics majors will not receive credit for this course 
This course is designed to give elemen tary teachers a clear understanding 
of the fundamental ideas of geometry, and to acquaint them with current 
emleentary school materials and methods. 

MUSIC 320 — Music for the Elementary Teacher. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the elemental) 
classroom teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 320 — Health and Physical Education 
for the Elementary Teacher. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the teaching of health and phvsical education 
for the elementary teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Edu- 
cation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 301 -- Educational Psychology. (5-0-5). 

I he application of behavioral science to the problems of learning 

118 



in the classroom. Prerequisite: Psychology loi and Admission to Teacher 

Education. 

LIBR \RY sen \( I 
LIBRARY SCIENCE 320 ( lataloging and Classification ol School 

Lil)i.n\ Materials (5-0-5). Fall. Introduction to the basic principles o( 
cataloging and classification ol books and audiovisual materials through 
[he use of Dewe) and Library ol Congress classification. The card 

catalog, shell list, physical procession, and procedure for ordering and 
using printed cards will be studied. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 110 — Materials Selection (5-0-5). Winter. 
Selection and evaluation of hooks and non-hook materials; emphasis 
on these which meet curriculum needs and interest, and which repre- 
sent various levels ol difficulty; ways ol stimulating their use. Attention 
will be given to selection aids and reading guidance. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 120 — School Library Administration and 
Organization (5-0-5) . Spring. Basic organization of books, non-book 
materials, and services for effective use in school libraries. Administering 
the budget, purchase of materials, personnel, circulation, inventory, 
weeding, and instruction in the use of library materials will be con- 
sidered. Examination of the improvement of instruction by correlating 
library use with school curricula. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 310 — Reference Materials. (5-0-5) . Summer. 
Study and evaluation of basic reference sources for eflective reference 
service in elementary and secondary schools. Designed to give the stu- 
dent a working knowledge of a library as an information and resource 
center. 

SPEECH CORRECTION 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 305 — Introduction to Exceptional Chil- 
dren. (5-0-5) . Fall. 

A study of the different kinds of exceptional children with em- 
phasis on etiological factors, educational implications, and rehabilitation 
requirements. Primary consideration will be given to general discussions 
of mental retardation, emotional and social disturbances, visual and hear- 
ing impairments, physical handicaps, and speech and language dis- 
orders. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 310 — Survey of Speech Problems. (5-0-5) . 
Fall. 

A study of the major etiology and basic therapy for all types of 
speech defects, with a concentration on those most commonly found in 
the classroom. The content of this course is designed for the speech cor- 
rection major as well as the classroom teacher who wishes to become 
informed about speech problems. Observations in both public schools 
and the speech and hearing clinic. 

119 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 315 - Language Development. (5-0-5) 
Winter. 

The study of normal language development with emphasis on oral 
language. This course includes the relationship between speech and lan- 
guage, developmental scales that trace language growth across various 
age levels, and implications of delayed speech and language. Observations 
in both public schools and the speech and hearing clinic. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 320 — Psychology of Speech. (5-0-5). 
Winter. 

Basic principles of psychology as they apply to speech, with em- 
phasis on learning, motivation, emotions, intelligence, personality, so- 
cial relations, and psychological effects of speech disorders. Observations 
in both the public schools and the speech and hearing clinic. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 325 — Phonetics for Speech Correctionists. 
(2-6-5) . Spring. 

Deals with the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) 
in speech correction. IPA transcription of normal and defective arti- 
culation and the important characteristics of regional dialects are stress- 
ed. Prerequisites: Special Education 310 and 315. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 330 — Anatomy and Physiology of the 
Speech and Hearing Mechanism. (5-0-5) . Spring. 

Anatomy and physiology of the head, neck, and thorax from a 
speech and hearing standpoint. Special emphasis is placed on functional 
considerations of the respiratory system, larynx, oral and nasal struc- 
tures, and ear. Prerequisites: Special Education 310 and 315. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 335 — Speech Science. (3-4-5) . Fall. 

Speech communication from a psychophysical standpoint. Study 
focuses on acoustics, physics of speech, transmission media, and physical 
analysis of speech. Prerequisites: Special Education 310 and 315. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 410 — Group Processes and Practicum. 
(3-4-5) . Fall. 

Characteristics of task oriented small behavior and interaction. 
Study focuses on the analysis and evaluation of group interaction and 
process, with particular emphasis on working with children in groups. 
Theories of group process are related to speech correction and super- 
vised clinical practice. Prerequisites: Completion of 300 level sequence 
in speech correction, Admission to Teacher Education. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 415 — Articulation Problems. (2-6-5). 
Winter. 

A study of the etiology, rationale, and methods of therapy for 
functional disorders of articulation. The course includes the develop- 
ment of a therapeutic program, lesson plans, and supervised clinical 
practice. Prerequisite: Special Education 410. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 120 — Audiometry. (2-6-5) Winter. 

The measurement of normal and defective hearing with the pure 

120 






tone audiometer. Particulai attention focuses on recording hearing thres- 
holds, audiogram interpretation, and the pathologies that cause hearing 
loss Students are also familiarized with speech audiometry and special 
audiometry equipment and techniques. Supervised clinical practice, 
prerequisites: Completion ol 300 level sequence in speech correction, 

Admission to IV. u her 1 du< ation. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 145 Aural Rehabilitation. (2-6-6). 

Spring. 

The stud) of theories and methods involved in speech reading, 
auditoiv training, and speech conservation foi the hearing impaired, 
■he importance of the conservation ol hearing is also stressed. Super- 
vised clinical practice. Prerequisite: Special Education 410. 

ENGINEERING 

(See listing under Department of Mathematics) 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH & SPEECH 

Professor Hugh Pendexter III, Head; Professors Anchors, Killorin, 
Seale. Strozier; Associate Professoi (ones; Assistant Professors Brooks, 
Brown, Jenkins, Ramsey, Suchower, Welsh, and White. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
MAJOR IN ENGLISH 
A student majoring in English must complete at least 40 hours 
of upper-division courses (300-400 kvel) in the major field, of which 
at least 15 hours must be on the 400 level. A major program must in- 
clude at least one ol the starred courses in each of the following groups: 

I. Shakespeare (404*) 
II. English Literature before 1700 (300*, 301*, 302*, 320*, 402, 403) 

III. English Literature after 1700 (303*, 304*, 305*, 307*, 311, 312, 
316, 321, 322) 

IV. American Literature (308*, 309*, 310*, 313, 315, 322) 
V. a. Comparative Literature (314*, 318*, 322*, 333*) 

b. English Language (324*, 325*, 410*) 

c. Speech (for Speech Majors) (341*, 345*, 346*) 

The major shall select one area of specialization from groups II-V 
and complete at least two additional courses in that area (starred or un- 
starred) . English 400, 401, 490, and -191 may, depending on the subject, 
be counted in any area of specialization. 

The major program must also include proficiency in foreign 
language equivalent to courses 101 through 201, and 25 quarter hours 
of courses, approved by the major department, from these related fields: 
literature in a foreign language, history, philosophy, art, music, speech. 
Those concentrating in Speech should include among their related-field 
courses, Speech 227 (5 hrs.) and 228 and two courses in dramatic litera- 
ture either in English or in a foreign language. 

121 



Course Offerings 

ENGLISH 

Students will be assigned to freshman English according to results 
of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

ENGLISH 99 — Fundamentals of Composition (3-4-0). Offered 
every quarter. 

This is the study and practice of sentence and paragraph struc- 
ture. Students must learn to write clearly, logically, coherently, and cor- 
rectly. In the 2-hour writing laboratory they practice composition. 

ENGLISH 121 — Composition and Non-fiction (5-0-5). Offered 
every quarter. 

Assignment to this course is based upon entrance test results or upon 
successful completion of English 99. The instruction focuses upon rhet- 
oric, organization of ideas, and techniques of reading. 

ENGLISH 122 — Composition and Introduction to Prose Fiction 
(5-0-5) . Offered every quarter. Prerequisite: grade of "C" in English 
121. 

The documented termpaper is included in this course. 

ENGLISH 103 — Honors Composition (5-0-5) . Fall 

Instruction in this course will not follow the traditional lecture 
method only; the students will read widely and write a research paper (or 
papers) in the fashion which the instructor thinks will best discipline 
them for independent study. 

ENGLISH 104 — Honors Composition and Introduction to Liter- 
ature (5-0-5) . Winter. 

In this course the students will read material in addition to the 
literature assigned for English 122 and write critical papers on topic 
selected from the periods covered. 

ENGLISH 110 — English as a Second Language (5-0-5). Offeree 
on demand. 

This course is designed to prepare students whose native language II 
not English to do the normal college composition work. Students receiving 1 
a grade of "C" or better are eligible for English 122. Admission by per | 
mission of the instructor. 

ENGLISH 221 — Composition and Introduction to Poetry anc J 
Drama (5-0-5) . Offered every quarter. Prerequisite: grade of "C" ii , 
English 122. 

ENGLISH 222 — Masterpieces of Literature (5-0-5). Offeree 
every quarter. Prerequisite: English 221. 

This course is prerequisite to all 300 and 400 level courses ir 
English. 

ENGLISH 300 — Early English Literature: Beginning througl 
1485 (5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 301 — Renaissance 1485-1063 (5-0-5) Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 302 — 17th Century: 1603-1660 (5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

122 



ENG1 imi 303 Vge ol Dryden and Pope (5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 304-18th Century: Swift through Blake (5-0-5). Alter- 
nate years. 

ENGLISH 305 • 19th Century I: Romanti< (5-0-5). Alternate 
years. 

ENGLISH 306 19th Century II: Victorian (5-0-5). Alternate 
years. 

ENGLISH 307 - 20th Century British (5-0-5). Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 308 — American Literature I: Beginning through Coo- 
per (3-0-3) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 309 — American Literature 11. (5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 310 — Amu k an Literature III: Rise of Naturalism to 
the present (5-0-5). Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 332 — Medieval and Renaissance Europe Literature 
(5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 333 — Modern European Literature (5-0-5) . Alternate 
years. 

ENGLISH 311 — British Novel I: Beginning through Austen (3- 
0-3) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 312 — British Novel II: Scott through Hardy (5-0-5). 
Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 316 — British Novel III: Conrad through present (5- 
0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 313 — American Novel I: Beginning through James 
(5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 315 — American Novel II: Naturalists to present (5- 
0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 314 — The European Novel (5-0-5). Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 318 — Greek and Roman Drama in Translation (5-0-5) . 
Alternate years 

ENGLISH 320 — British Drama I: Beginning to 1540 (5-0-5). 
Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 321 — British Drama II: 1660-1850 (5-0-5). Alternate 
years. 

ENGLISH 322 — Modern British, American, and Continental 
Drama: Ibsen to the present (5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH 324 — Introduction to Linguistics (5-0-5) . Fall 

ENGLISH 325 — Advanced Grammar: Generative-Transformation- 
al Grammar (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: English 324. 

ENGLISH 331 — Children's Literature (will not apply toward 
English major) . (5-0-5) . Offered on demand. 

SENIOR COURSES 
ENGLISH 400- Seminar ( (1-5) -0- (1-5) ) . Offered on demand. 
ENGLISH 401 — Seminar ( (1-5) -0- (1-5) ) . Offered on demand. 
ENGLISH 402 — Milton (5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

123 



ENGLISH 403 — Chaucer (5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

ENGLISH J0 1 — Shakespeare (5-0-5). Fall. 

ENGLISH 410 — History of the English Language (5-0-5). Alter- 
nate years. 

ENGLISH 490 — Independent Study ( (1-5) -0- (1-5) ) . Offered 
on demand. 

ENGLISH 491 — Independent Study ( (1-5) -0- (1-5) ) . Offered 
on demand. 

SPEECH 

SPEECH 227 — Theatre Laboratory (0-3-1) . Offered every quarter. 

Practical experience in theatre. The student will work on the Mas- 
quers' production of the quarter. Only one hour's credit may be earned 
per quarter. The maximum total credit allowed in Theatre Laboratory 
is five quarter hours. 

SPEECH 228 — Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). Offered every 
quarter. Practice and theory of oral communication. Each student makes 
several major speeches. The physiology of the speech mechanism is 
covered, and articulation is studied within the framework of tht Inter- 
national Phonetic Alphabet. 

SPEECH 341 — Oral Interpretation (5-0-5). Fall. 

A practical course in the oral interpetation of poetry and prose. 
The techniques of literature analysis are stressed along with the vocal 
techniques needed to communicate an author's mood and meaning. 

SPEECH 345 — History of the Theatre (5-0-5) . Winter. 

A survey of theatrical art from its beginning to the present day. The 
course emphasizes the development of the physical theatre. 

SPEECH 346 — Play Production (5-0-5) . Spring 

A course in the theory and practice of acting and directing, wirh 
special attention to image-making on stage. Individuals under super- 
vision prepare and execute the production of scenes and short plays. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

(See listing under Department of Biology) 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Professor Harry Persse, Head; Assistant Professor McKinnell 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
MAJOR IN MUSIC 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Music 

The college offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in j 
music. Within this degree program the student may choose a con- j 
centration from the areas of performance, music literature, music 
theory, or music education. 

In addition to satisfying the requirements of the core curriculum 

124 



for the bacheloi ol arts degree, those majoring in music will complete 
the following program: 

Lowa 1 1 » \ ision i oui ses: 

M.isu I !u-.»i\ I 10. I I i. 1 12 6 

Sightsinging 101, 102, 103 ?> 

Musi* l 1koi\ 210, 21 1. 212 6 
Sightsinging 201, 202, 203 

Applied Mush I !<>. I II. I 12 6 

240, 241, 242 6 



30 
Upper division courses: 

Mllsic HistOlN 310, 311 _... 10 

Music Theory 312, 112 6 

Applied Mus,\ 340, 341, 342 6 

440, 111, 1 12 _ 6 



28 
Additional courses in music may be elected by the student, but 
no more than seventy hours in (he major field may be applied to- 
wards i he degree. 

In addition to the above, the program must include fifteen to 
thirty hours of approved electives in related fields. 

Course Offerings 
ART 

ART 101 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5) . Alternate years. 

An introduction to the principles of design and the means and 
materials of drawing. 

ART 102 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5) . Alternate years. 

A continuation of Art 101. 

ART 103 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5) . Alternate years. 

A continuation of Art 102. 

ART 200 — Introduction to the Visual Arts (5-0-5) . Fall, Winter. 

The study of theories of art and their application in master-works 
of art from all a^es, directed toward increasing the understanding and 
enjoyment of art for the non-art major. Not recommended for students 
who have credit for Art 291. 

ART 201 — Drawing and Painting (0-6-3). Alternate years. 

Drawing and painting from various figures, animals, and objects, 
employing various materials and media. 

ART 202 — Drawing and Painting (0-6-3) . Alternate yaers. 

A continuation ol Art 201. 

ART 203 — Drawing and Painting (0-6-3) . Alternate years. 

125 



A continuation of Art 202. 

ART 290 — History of Art (5-0-5) . Offered on demand. 

A survey of world art from ancient times through the Baroque. 

Art 291 — Historv of Art (5-0-5) . Offered on demand. 

A survey of world art fom the end of the seventeenth century to 
the present. Not recommended for students who have credit for Art 200. 

ART .120 — Art for the Elementary Teacher (4-2-5) . Fall, Winter. 

A study of materials and methods for teaching art at the elementary 
school level . 

ART 301 — Ceramics (3-4-5) . Offered on demand. 

An introductory course in the fundamentals of pottery, clay, 
modeling, glazing and firing methods. 

ART 302 — Ceramics (2-3-5) . Offered on demand. 

A continuation of Art 301 with emphasis on the potter's wheel, 
and the study of glazed materials. 

ART 303 — Ceramics (3-4-5) . Offered on demand. 

A continuation of Art 302 with emphasis on the potter's wheel 
and an introduction to elementary ceramic technology. 

Course Offerings 

MUSIC 
Theoretical Courses 

MUSIC 101 — Sight Singing (2-0-1) . Fall. 

A study of sight singing techniques applied to diatonic materials. 

MUSIC 102 — Sight Singing (2-0-1) . Winter. 

A continuation of Music 101. 

MUSIC 103 — Sight Singing (2-0-1) . Spring. 

A continuation of Music 102. 

MUSIC 110 — Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Fall. 

An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music and 
eartraining. 

MUSIC 1 1 1 — Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2) . Winter. 

A continuation of Music 110. 

MUSIC 112 — Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 111. 

MUSIC 201 —\ Sight Singing (2-0-1). Fall. 

A study of sight singing techniques aplied to chromatic materials. 

MUSIC 202 — Sight Singing (2-0-1) . Winter. 

A continuation of Music 201. 

MUSIC 203 — Sight Singing (2-0-1) . Spring. 

A continuation of Music 202. 

MUSIC 210 — Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Fall. 

A continuation of the study of music theory introducing modu- 
lation and chromatic material. Prerequisite: Music 112. 

126 



MUSIC 21 1 Mush I hear) and Eartraining (2-1-2) . Winti r. 

I A ( ontinuation ol M usi< 210. 
MUSIC 212 Musi< rheor) and Eartraining (2-1-2) . Spring. 
\ i ontinuation oJ M usi< 2 I I . 

MUSIC 312 Form and Analysis Offered on demand. 

The stud) oJ the forma] principles <>i music .is exemplified in 
nusical works ol the various style periods. 

MUSIC 320 Music loi the Elementary Teachei (5-0-5). Winter, 
summer. 

An introduction to music skills and materials foi the elementary 
Jkssroom teacher. 

MUSIC 350 Conducting (3-0-3). Offered on demand. 

An introduction to the problems and techniques of conducting. 

MUSIC 111 — Counterpoint (3-0-b). Offered on demand. 

\ study ol the contrapuntal techniques of Renaissance music. 

MUSIC 112 — 20th Centur) Materials (3-0-3). Alternate years. 

A study of the materials and techniques of 20th Century music. 

MUSIC 420, 121 — Piano Pedagogy (2-0-2). Offered on demand. 

Introduction to techniques of piano instruction from the elemen- 
arv through the advanced levels. 

MUSIC 450 — Orchestration (3-0-3) . Offered on demand. 

An introduction to the techniques of scoring for instrumental 
ensembles and the orchestra. 

History and Literature Courses 

MUSIC 200 — Introduction to Music Literature (5-0-5). Fall, 
Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy fine 
music by analysis ol form, style and the media of musical expression 
from the great periods of musical art. Not open to music majors. 

MUSIC 310 — Music History (5-0-5) . Alternate years. 

The history of music in Western civilization from its origins 
through the Baroque period. 

Prerequisite: One year of music theory or permission of the in- 
structor. 

MUSIC 311 — Music History (5-0-5). Alternate years. 
The history of music in Western civilization from the Baroque 
period to the present. 

Prerequisite: One year of music theory or permission of the in- 
structor. 

MUSIC 422 — Opera Literature (3-0-3) . Offered on demand. 
A study ol operatic masterpieces from the origin of the form to 
the present. 

MUSIC 490 — Independent Study (1 to 5 hours). 

127 



APPLIED MUSIC COURSES 

Applied music courses consist of one or two twenty-five minute 
private lessons per week. A special fee of S24.00 for one lesson or $48.00 
lor two lessor per week is charged quarterly to students not majoring 
in music and to music majors enrolled for less than ten hours credit 
or enrolled for applied music courses in addition to those required in 
the music program. 

To receive credit towards satisfaction of the applied music require- 
ment in the music program a student should have met the entrance 
requirements for proficiencv in his principal instrument. Credit in 
a secondary instrument may not be used to satisfy this requirement. 

In the following system replacing the third digit by a letter 
(A,B>C) indicates credit in a secondary instrument. 

MUSIC 130, 131, 132, 230, 231, 232; 330, 331, 332; 430, 431, 432 — 
Applied Music. One hour credit per quarter. One twenty-five minute 
private lesson per week. 

MUSIC 140, 141, 142; 240, 241, 212; 340, 341, 342; 440, 441, 
442 — Applied Music. Two hours credit per quarter. Two twenty-five 
minute private lessons per week. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Professor William Easterling, Head; Professor Lubs; 
Assistant Professor Noble. 

Course Offerings 
CHINESE 

CHINESE 101-102 — Elementary Chinese (10-0-10). Offered on 
demand. 

A basic training in Chinese conversation and reading. 

CHINESE 201 — Intermediate Chinese (5-0-5) . Offered on demand. 

CHINESE 233 — Chinese Literature in Translation (5-0-5) . Offered 
on demand. 

FRENCH* 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

FOR THE MAJOR IN FRENCH 

A student majoring in French must complete at least 40 quartei 
hours ol French bevond French 202. This program includes successful 
completion of one quarter's study (15 quarter hours) in France with 
the University S\stem ol Georgia Study Abroad Program. The Depart 



•Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out of th< 
library. These tapes are recorded at 7y 2 i.p.s. 

128 



inn <>l Foreign Languages <>i Armstrong State College reserves th<- i 
d tesi .1 returning student >n an) 01 .ill material covered during the ^m 
pit's quartei in France "Material covered" includes information .1 
fedent should have acquired in scheduled museum \isits 01 othei field 
■ps, geography ol France, and an) othei information which mighl be 
■pluded undei the heading ol general culture. 

\n additional thirty quartei hours are required in .1 related area, 
t Is recommended that related courses be taken from the following: 

(1) Literature <>t a language othei than French. This would in- 
clude English, American, foreign 61 comparative Literature. 
In the case of foreign Literature, it is strongl) recommended 
that the coiuso be taken in the original language. 

(2) History. It is naturally recommended that the bulk of courses 
be taken in French and Euro]>ean histroy. 

(3) Foreign Language other than French, preferably a non-Ro- 
mance language, plus courses in linguistics, such as English 410. 

Couse Offerings 

FRENCH 101-102-103 — Elementary French (15-0-15). Offered 
ach year. 

A course for beginners. The approach is primarily oral, and daily 
nactice with tape recordings is required. No credit for graduation or 
ransier will be given until the sequence is completed. 

FRENCH 110 — (3-0-3) 111 — . (3-0-3) — 112 (4-0-4). Offered 
ach year. 

These are the same courses as French 101-102 above, but more time 
> allowed for covering the work. Students will be enrolled for these 
elections on advice ot the instructor. 

FRENCH 201 — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Offered each 
[uarter. 

Prerequisite: TTiree quarters oi college French or three years of 
tigh school French. Further reading of texts, and oral and composition 
>ractice. 

FRENCH 202 — Intermediate French (5-0-5) . Offered each quarter. 
FRENCH 301 — Trench Literature of the Middle Ages and the 
lenaissance. (5-0-5) . Offered alternate years. 

FRENCH 302 — French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Offered alter- 
late years. 

Prerequisite: French 201. Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and 
lacine. 

FRENCH 304 — French Literature of the 19th Century (5-0-5). 
Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: French 201. 
A study of Romantic prose, poetry, and drama, with lectures and 
iiscussions in French. 

129 



FRENCH 305 — French Literature of the 19th Century: Realism 
and Naturalism (5-0-5) . Offered alternate years. 

FRENCH 351-352-853 — Study Abroad in France (15 hours credit) . 
This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in France in con- 
junction with the Study Abroad Program ol the University System 
ol Georgia. The program is offered in Dijon for a period of eight 
weeks. Dining this time the student will receive intensive instruc- 
tion in language and culture and will be expected to engage in 
co-auricular activities sopnsored by the University of Dijon and USG. 

FRENCH 401 — French Literature of the Twentieth Century 
(5-0-5) . Prerequisite: French 201. This course is a study of contemporary 
prose, poetry, and drama with lectures and discussions in French. This 
course, normally the last course in French that a student would take, 
includes a serious term paper cf considerable magnitude to be written 
in French. 

* GERMAN 

GERMAN 101-102-103 — Elementary German (15-0-15). Offered 
each year. Drill on pronunciation and elements of grammar, conver- 
sation, and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German isi 
used as practicable in the classroom instruction. The course includes 
reading of texts and translations, conversation, dictation, and dialogues. 
No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

GERMAN 201 — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Three quarters of college German or three years of high school German. 
Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

GERMAN 202 — Conversation and Composition (5-0-5) . Offered 
on demand. Prerequisite: 201. 

GERMAN 211 — Scientific German (3-0-3). Offered on demand. 
Prerequisite: same as 201. Readings in scientific and technical material 
with special attention to grammatical difficulties encountered in this 
literature. 

GERMAN 304 — 19th Century German Literature (5-0-5) . Offered 
on demand. 

GERMAN 320 — German Literature of the Twentieth Centun 
(5-0-5) . Offered on demand. Prerequisite: four quarters of colleg< 
German, or an equivalent language background, to be determined fr 
the instructor. 

The course will include readings and discussion in German o 
works by Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, and Gunter Grass, and the stud 
of other major contemporary German authors. 

GERMAN 351-352-353 — Study Abroad in Germany (15 hour 
credit) . This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in Gei 
many in conjunction with the Study Abroad Program of the Universit' | 
System of Georgia. The program is offered in Germany for a perio< 
of eight weeks. During this time the student will receive intensiv J 

130 






pstruction in language and culture and will participate in University 
iponsoi ed a< tivii ies. 

GERMAN 190 Special Reading (5-0-5) . Offered on demand. 

Ill BR1 W 

HEBREW 110 Elementary Hebrew Offered on demand. 

Mechanics ol reading and writing; I>;im< vocabulary; simple con- 
versation; essentials ol grammar. 

HEBREW III Elementary Hebrew (3-0-3) . Offered on demand. 
Prerequisite: Hebrew 110 or a satisfactory scon- on a placement exami- 
nation. 

Continuation ol I [ebrew 1 10. 

HEBREW 112 — Elementar) Hebrew (4-0-4). Offered on demand. 
Prerequisite: Hebrew 111 or a satisfactory score on a placement exami- 
nation. 

Developing fluency in conversatii ft, grammar and composition. 

(Hebrew 110, 111, 112 are not acceptable as fulfillment of the 
language requirement in the core curriculum.) 

•SPANISH 

SPANISH 101-102-103 — Elementary Spanish (15-0-15). Offered 
each year. These courses arc for the purpose of providing the 
student with the elements ol Spanish leading, composition and con- 
versation. No credit for graduation will be given until sequence is 
completed. 

SPANISH 201 — Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Three quarters of college Spanish or three years of high school Spanish. 
Further reading of texts and oral and composition practice. 

SPANISH 202 — Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5) . Offered on demand. 
A continuation of Spanish 201. 

SPANISH 351-352-353 — Study Abroad in Spain (15 hours credit) . 
This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in Spain in 
conjunction with the Study Abroad Program of the University System 
of Georgia. The program is offered in Salamanca for a period of eight 
weeks. During this time the students will receive intensive instruction 
in language and culture which will be complemented by a number of 
excursions. 

FRENCH 

(See listing under Department of Foreign Languages) 



•Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out of the 
library. These tapes are recorded at 7y 2 i.p.s. 

131 




GEOGRAPHY 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Science) 

GERMAN 

(See listing under Department of Foreign Languages) 

HEALTH 

(See listing under Department of Allied Health Services) 

HEBREW 

(See listing under Department of Foreign Languages) 



132 



DEPAR1 MEN 1 OF Mis I ORY WD 
POLITIC \I. SCIEN( l 

Professor Evans ('. [ohnson, Head; l'i < >lt ^s« >i s Beecher, Coyle, and 
Wu; Associate Professors Haunton, Lanier, Newman; Assistant Pro- 
kssors Boney, Clark, Comaskey, Duncan, Gross, VfaCarthy; Patterson. 

Dl PAR 1 Ml N 1 Al RJ QUIRJ MENTS FOR 1 HI MAJOR 

IN HISTORY 

Students majoring in history should satisfy the basi< college n 
■uirements foi the Bacheloi ol Arts degree during the Freshman and 
sophomore years. The minimum r equirement in addition to History 
111 and 115 for a major in history is forty quarter hours from history 
courses numbered 300 or above. In selecting courses for a major, the 
student ma\ elect to emphasize the history of the United States, or the 
history of Europe, but he ma\ not present a major exclusively in either 
of these areas. 

Required courses: History 111, 115, and 300, but History 114 and 
115 may not be counted in the forty quarter hours required for the 
major. History majors are advised to register for History 300 in the first 
quarter of their Junior year or in the first quarter after they elect to 
major in history. 

The major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 
language equivalent to courses 101 through 201, and 25 quarter hours 
of courses, above the sophomore level, from these related fields: History 
of Art and Music, Economics, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, 
and Sociology. 

Course Offerings 
HISTORY 

HISTORY 114 — History of Western Civilization. (5-0-5) . Offered 
each quarter. 

A chronological survey of the main currents of political, social, 
religious, and intellectual activity in western civilization from the time 
of the ancient Mediterranean civilization to 1715. 

HISTORY 115 — History of Western Civilization. (5-0-5) . Offered 
each quarter. 

A continuation of History 114 to the present. 

HISTORY 251 — American History to 1865. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the 
United States to the end of the Civil War. 

HISTORY 251 — American History Since 1865. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. 

133 



A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the 
United States from 1865 to the present. 

HISTORY 3(H) — Problems in Historiography. (5-0-5). Summer 
and Fall. 

A study of the nature and meaning of history, some of the prob- 
lems involved in the writing and study of history, and selected inter- 
pretations. 

HISTORY 320 — The Civilization of China and the Far East, 
Part I. (5-0-5) . Fall. 

The history of Fast Asia civilization from ancient times through 
the eighteenth century, with emphasis on characteristic political, eco- 
nomic, and social developments. 

HISTORY 321 — The Civilization of China and the Far East, 
Part II. (5-0-5) . Winter. 

The history of East Asian nations from the nineteenth century to 
the present, with emphasis on political, social, economic, and intellec- 
tual developments. 

HISTORY 322 — History of Japan. (5-0-5). Spring. 

A survey of the history of Japan, with major emphasis placed upon 
the development of Japan since 1600. 

HISTORY 323 — Historv of India and South Asia. (5-0-5) . Spring. 

A survey of the civilization of South Asia, with principal attention 
given to India and Pakistan since 1600. 

HISTORY 329 — History of Russia to 1917. (5-0-5). Winter. 

A survey of Russian historv during the Kievan, Tartar, Muscovite, 
and Imperial eras. 

HISTORY 330 — Twentieth Century Russia. (5-0-5) . Spring. 

An examination of the forces leading to the downfall of Tsarist 
Russia, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the political, economic, andl 
social history of the Soviet era. 

HISTORY 341 — Historv of England, 1450-1690. (5-0-5). Fall. 

Emphasis is given to the constitutional, religious, and economic 
developments, but social and intellectual phases are treated. 

HISTORY 343 — Early Middle Ages, A.D. 333 - c. 1000. (5-0-5) 
Fall. 

The history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire through 
the Carolingian period with special emphasis on hte institutional devel 
opments which led to the emergence of stable kingdoms out of the 
chaos of the barbarian invasions. 

HISTORY 344 — The High Middle Ages, c. 100 - c. 1300. (5-0-5) 
Winter. 

The history of Europe from c. 100 to c. 1300 with emphasis on th(. 
struggle between church and state, the Crusade movement, and th( 
12th century intellectual renaissance, all of which profoundly influencec 
the development of the various medieval kingdoms. 

134 






HISTORY 345 rhc Late Middle Vges and Renaissance. (5- 

b-5). Spring. 

rhe history ol Europe from c. 1300 to 1517 with emphasis on the 
fclitical, cultural, and intellectual developments which transformed 

medieval societ) into Renaissance Man, 

HISTORY 347 Hie French Revolution and Napoleon. 

!o-5). Fall. 

I he ideas and events of the Old Regime and the Enlightenment in 
Irance, with emphasis on the impact ol the French Revolution and the 
career of Napoleon upon the major European nations! 

HISTORY 348 — The History ol Europe from 1815 to 1900. 
(5-0-5) . Winter. 

A study ol the most important social, political, and intellectual 
directions ol European history from the Congress of Vienna to the 
end of the nineteenth century. 

HLSTORV 350 Europe in the Twentieth Century. (5-0-5). 

Spring. 

A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, with 
emphasis upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World 
Wars. 

HISTORY 352 — Latin American History. (5-0-5) . Offered on 
demand. 

A survey of Latin American history and institutions including 
the conquest, the revolutionary movements, and the rise of dictatorship. 

HISTORY 353 or SOCIOLOGY 353 — Prespectives on Black Ex- 
perience in the United States. (5-0-5) . Offered on demand. 

Study of historic and current trends in selected frames of reference 
of experiences encountered by black people in the United States, em- 
phasizing social movements and social change, urban and institutional 
processes, social values and personality formation. 

HISTORY 354 — Social and Intellectual History of the United 
States Since 1865. (5-0-5) . Spring. 

An examination of political theory, social development, and the 
principal trends of American thought since 1865. Prerequisite: History 
252. 

HISTORY 355 — Studies in American Diplomacy. (5-0-5) . Sum- 
mer & Winter. 

Studies of American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from 
colonial times to the present. Prerequisite: History 252. 

HISTORY 356 — American Constitutional History. (5-0-5) . Fall. 

A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitution 
of the United States. 

HISTORY 357 — The Old South. (5-0-5) . Fall. 

The colonial South through secession; development and opera- 

135 



tion of the plantation system: emergence of the ante-bellum social and 
political patterns of the region. 

HISTORY 358 — The New South. (5-0-5) . Spring. 

Emphasis is placed upon the social, economic, and political read- 
justments of the late nineteenth century, and the impact of industrialism 
and liberalism in the twentieth century. Prerequisite: Hisory 252. 

HISTORY 359 — Civil War and Reconstruction. (5-0-5). Winter. 

The causes and significance of the American Civil War, with 
minor consideration of the military campaigns; political, economic and 
social aspects of Reconstruction. 

HISTORY 360 — Recent American History. (5-0-5). Spring. 

Beginning with the presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes, the course 
will emphasize populism and progressivism, the period between the 
wars, and postwar readjustment. 

HISTORY 361 — Great Historians. (5-0-5) . 

The course is designed to acquaint the student with major his- 
torians and historical philosophies through individual reading under 
the direction of the instructor. 

HISTORY 362 — Independent Study. (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual re- 
search and reading in some field of history under the supervision of 
a member of the staff. Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences 
with the adviser, and written reports and essays. Open only to sen- 
iors with a B average in history and in their overall work. Admission 
will be subject to approval of the individual adviser and of the Head of 
the Department of History. 

HISTORY 110 — Problems in Medieval History (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. 

A detailed analysis of a specific problem in medieval history by 
examination of primary materials. Permission of instructor required. 

GEOGRAPHY 

GEOGRAPHY 111 — World Human Geography. (5-0-5). Fall. 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activi- 
ties and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHILOSOPHY 201 — Introduction to Philosophy. (5-0-5). Fall, 
Winter, Spring. 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of 
philosophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the re- 
lation ot philosophy to art, science, and religion. Includes a survev ol 

136 



Ik- h.isu issues unci ur.ijoi lyiics ol |jJiilos<>]:>h) and shows llicii sources 
n cxi>cricncc, historv, .mil representative thinkers 

PHILOSOPHY 501 History ,>i Philosophy: Ancient and Medi- 
Lal. (5-0-5) . Fall, 

\n historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the development 
>l 1- luropean philosophy hoin ill'.- ciil\ Greeks through the Middle \ 
ivith emphasis on selected works ol major philosophers. 

PHILOSOPHY 302 - History ol Philosophy: Modem (5-0-5). 
IVinter. 

European philosophy from the Renaissance through Kant, em- 
phasizing selected works o! majoi philosophers. 

IMIll OSOPHY 303 — 19th and 20th Century Philosophy. (5-0-5). 
Spi ing. 

A study of the major philosophers in philosophical movements of 
lie 19th and 20tli centuries. Prerequisite: Philosophy 201, 301, or 302. 

PHILOSOPHY 320 — Introduction to Oriental Philosophy. (5- 
0-5) . Fall. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

DEPARTMEN I AL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science majors must complete Political Science 200 and 
a minimum of fort\ quarter hours of upper-division courses (300-400 
level) in the major field. The major program must include at least 
one course from each of the following groups: 

I. American Political Institutions (300,304,305,307) 
II. Comparative Government (308, 309) 

III. International Relations (306, 319, 320) 

IV. Political Theory (331, 332) 

The student must complete a reasonable distribution of courses 
from the four areas lifted above. Political Science 400 (Senior Seminar) 
may be taken with permission of the Department Head. 

The major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 
language equivalent to courses 101 and 102 (French or German is re- 
commended for those contemplating graduate work) , and 25 quarter 
hours of courses from these related fields: economics, psychology, his- 
toid geography, philosophy, sociology, and statistics. 

Course Offerings 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 113 — Government of the United States. 
(5-0-5) . Offered each quarter. 

A study of the structure, theory, and functions of the national 
government in the United States and some of the major problems of 
the state and local government. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 200 — Introduction to Political Science. 
(5-0-5) . Fall. 

This course deals with the area of political science as a discipline, 

137 



and serves an an introduction to the systematic study of modern gov- 
ernment. Attention is given to the role of politics in society; the nature 
and origins of the state; the nature and development of political insti- 
tutions; the basis ol political action; and the theories, forms, and processes 
of government. Required of all political science majors. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 300 — Political Behavior. (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course emphasizes the economic, psychological, and social 
aspects of political behavior. It examines the concepts of power, roles 
groups, elites, decision-making, political communications, and systems 
analysis. Consideration is also given to the basic theories, variables, 
and hvpotheses used in empirical research in political science. Designed 
primarily for those students intending to go to graduate school. Prere- 
quisites; Political Science 113 or equivalent, and Political Science 200. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 304 — Public Administration. (5-0-5). 
Winter. 

This is a one quarter course that is primarily concerned with or- 
ganizational theorv and bureaucratic behavior, whether public or private, 
but with an emphasis on the behavior ol the bureaucracy of the national 
government. This course will also be concerned with the political process 
as it unfolds in the administration of laws enacted by the Congress. 
A number of case sttidies on the subject will be examined in some detail. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 113, or equivalent. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 305 — State and Local Government. (5- 
0-5) . Spring. 

This course is concerned primarily with the political process and 
the behavior of political actors at the local and state levels of govern- 
ment, primarily in the United States. It i> concerned with the tech- 
niques and research results of the relevant empirical literature that 
has evolved over the past 15 years in the field; i.e., local community 
studies of Floyd Hunter, Robert A. Dahl, and others. Prerequisite: 
Political Science 113, or equivalent. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 306 — International Law. (5-0-5) . Spring. 

An introduction to selected public international law topics includ- 
ing: recognition, state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, nationality, 
the law of treaties, the law of diplomacy, and the law of war. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 307 — Constitutional Law. (5-0-5) . Spring. 

A study of the development of the Linked States government 
through judicial interpretation of the Constitution. The case study 
method of analysis is used, but some attention is given also to re- 
cent behavioral writing on judicial decision-making. Prerequisite: Poli- 
tical Science 113, or equivalent. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 308 — Comparative Government: Western 
Europe. (5-0-5) . Fall. 

An analytical and comparative study of the major Western Eu- 
ropean governments, with principal emphasis upon the analysis of the 
condition* which led to effective and stable parliamentary government, 

138 



uul those which lead to the inefficiency, instability and break-down 
)l such systems. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 01 equivalent, and 
political Science 200. 

POL1 riCAl SC1ENC1 509 i omparative Government: Soviet 
Union. 5 5) . Wintei . 

\ continuation ol Political Science 308, with emphasis on the 
political system ol the U S.S.R. and the Soviet blo< ol nations in Eastern 
lurope. Prerequisite: Political Science 113, oi equivalent, Political 

Science 200. 

POL1 IK. \1 SCIENi 1 319 International Relations. (5-0 
Winter. 

\u introduction to the theories, forces, and practices dominating 
contemporary international relations. 

POLI1 [CAL SCI1 \( 1 320 -- International Relations: The Far 
East. (5-0-5) . Spi ing. 

POUTICAL sen nci 331-332 -- Political Theory. 
An historical study of the development of ideas relative to the 
state and government from Socrates and Plato to the present. Attention 
is directed primaril) to the political though 1 ol a selected group ol 

eminent philosophers. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 331 — From Socrates to the 17th Century 
(5-0-5) . Fall. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 332 — From the 17th Century to the 
Present. (5-0-5) . Winter 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 400 — Senior Seminar. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue research and read- 
ing in some field of political science under the supervision of the staff. 
Open only to seniors with a B average in political science. Admission 
Will be subject to approval of the department head. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Assoc. Professor Regina Yoast, Director; Assistant 
Professors Johnson, Swinson, and Ball 

(See listing under Department of Education) 
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professor John S. Hinkle, Acting Head; Professor Winn, 
Assistant Professors Hansen, Findeis, Saunders, Sheffield, Semmes, Brown, 
Eldredge. 

All degree programs require at least 10 hours of mathematics. This 
requirement may be satisfied in any one of three ways: 

(a) For LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS (English, history, etc.) : Math- 
ematics 105 and 106. 

139 



(b) For SOCIAL SCIENCES AND BUSINESS MAJORS: Mathe- 
matics 100, 135, and 211. 

(c) For BIOLOGY, ( HEMISTRY, AND MATHEMATICS MA- 
JORS: Mathematics 101-102 (unless exempted) , and Math 104. 

Students should consult with the Department Head in their major 
field for possible variations <>1 the above options (a), (b), and (c) . 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

IN MATHEMATICS 

A major in mathematics will consist of at least 30 quarter hours 
beyond the calculus sequence (Mathematics 104-201-202-203). 

Every major program must incude Mathematics 311-312 and at 
least one of these sequences: 309-332; 401-402. 

A Mathematics major must support his work in mathematics with 
15 quarter hours of approved elective courses in related fields (chemis- 
try, physics, or economics, etc.) beyond the core curriculum requirements. 
Students are urged to complete as many of the General Education 
(Core curriculum) requirements as possible before entering their junior 
year. 

Course Offerings 
ENGINEERING 

ENGNIEERING GRAPHICS 113 — (0-6-2). Offered on demand. 

Topics of study include lettering (capital and lower case) ; the 
use of the instruments; geometric construction; orthographic projection; 
emphasis on discriptive geometry concepts as applied to the solution of 
problems involving orthographic projection of solids, auxiliary views, 
and points, lines and planes. 

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 114 — (0-6-2). Offered on demand. 
Prerequisite: 113. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines and planes bv use of the revolution method; intersection of sur- 
faces: warper srufaces: the development of surfaces. Practical appli- 
cations are emphasized. 

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 115 — (0-6-2). Upon demand. 
Prerequisite: 1 14. 

Topics of study include sections and conventions; dimensioning; 
pictorial representation; detail sketches; shop processes; assembly draw- 
ings From detail sketches; working pictorial sketches; introduction tc 
charts and graphs; reproduction processes, ink tracing on cloth; graphical 
calculus. 

MATHEMATICS 

MATHEMATICS 100 — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. Academic credit will not be given for more than one of the 
courses 100, 101, and 105. 

140 



1,1 



Sets, |)U)|)i-i iii-s ol ihc Real numbers, solution ol Equations and 
i.ilniis in one variable, 1 men and Quadratic Functions and iheii 

i.iplis. Inn .11 systems. 

M \ i ill \i \ l u s 101 Pre Calculus Mathematics I Fall, 

f inter, Spring. Prerequisites: Sal score ol 150 oi bettei <>n both verbal 
ml mathematics, oi consent ol instructor. Vcademu credit will not 
I given lot more than one ol the courses 100, 101, and 105. 

S is. real numbers, equations and inequalities, [unctions and graphs, 
tolynomials, exponential and logarithmic functions. 

MATHEMATICS 102 Pre Calculus Mathematics II 5-0-5) . Fall 
(Tinier, Spring. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 or consent ol instructor. 
Vuulcinu credit will not be given foi more than one ol the courses 102, 
06, and i 

Trigonometric functions, Analytic trigonometry. Systems of Equa- 
ions and Inequalities, determinants, complex numbers, Sequences. Ele- 
Bents oi Analytic Geometr) (linear, parabolas and ellipses). 

MATHEMATICS 101 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
•'all. Spring. Prerequisites: One of the following: (1) SAT score of 
>L\") or bettei on both verbal and mathematics, (2) A grade of C or 
fetter in Mathematics 102, (3) Consent of instructor. 

Introduction to analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, 
he derivative and applications. 

MATHEMATICS 105 — Logic and Sets (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. Academic credit will not be given for more than one of the 
ourses 100, 101, and 105. 

This course is designed for liberal arts students. Its purpose is to 
lelp the student acquire an understanding of the laws of logical think- 
ng and an ability to read mathematical language. 

MATHEMATICS 106 — Introduction to Modern Mathematics 
(5-0-5) . Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerquisite: Mathematics 105 or consent 
)f instructor. Academic credit will not be given for more than one of 
he courses 102, 106, and 135. 

This course is designed for liberal arts students, to follow Mathe- 
matics 105. Various topics from elementary mathematics are presented 
with a modern approach. 

MATHEMATICS 135 — Finite Mathematics (5-0-5) . Fall, Winter, 
Spring. Prerequisites: Mathematics 100 or its equivalent. Academic credit 
ivill not be given for more than one of the courses 102, 106, and 135. 

Logic for compound statements, sets and subsets, premutations, 
combinations, partitions and counting methods, probability theory, 
elementary vector and matrix applications. 

MATHEMATICS 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Winter, Fall. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104. 

The definite integral and applications, the differential and integral 

141 



calculus ot exponential, logarthmic and trionometric functions, and 
techniques of integration. 

MATHEMA1 ICS 202 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring, Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. 

Polai coordinates, conic sections, vectors in the plane, parametric 
equations, indeterminate Forms, and improper integrals. 

MATHEMATICS 203 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. 

Three dimensional vectors, solid analytic geometry, differential 
calculus of several variables, multiple integration, and infinite series. 

MATHEMATICS 211 -- Elementary Statistics (5-0-5). Fall, Win- 
ter. Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 135 or consent of instructor. 

This course includes measures of central tendency and dispersion; 
properties of probability distributions, inferences concerning means, 
standard deviations, and proportions; analysis of variance; correlation; 
and regression. 

MATHEMATICS 305 — Differential Equations with Applications 
(5-0-5) . Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 203. 

MATHEMATICS 306* — Fourier Series and Boundry Value Prob- 
lems with Applications (3-0-3) . Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 305. 

MATHEMATICS 309 — Vector Analysis (5-0-5) . Fall. Prerequisite 
Mathematics 203. 

MATHEMATICS 131, 312, 313 — Abstract Algebra (3-0-3). Fall, 
Winter, Spring, respectively. Prerequisite: Mathematics 203. 

MATHEMATICS 332 — Mathematical Statistics (5-0-5) . Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 203. 

MATHEMATICS 350 - Basic Ideas of Arithmetic. (5-0-5) . Fall,' 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 105, 100, or 101 and at least sopho- 
more standing. Mathematics majors will not receive credit for this 
course. 

This course is designed to give elementary teachers a clear under- 
standing of the fundamental ideas of arithmetic, and to acquaint them 
with current elementary school materials and methods. 

MATHEMATICS 351 — Basic Ideas of Geometry. (5-0-5) . Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 105, 100, or 101 and at least sophomore 
standing. Mathematics majors will not receive credit for this course. 

This course is designed to give elementary teachers a clear under- 
standing of the fundamental ideas of geometry, and to acquaint them 
with current elementary school materials and methods. 

MATHEMATICS 400 -- Special Topics ( (1-5) -0- (1-5) ) . Offered 
on demand. 

MATHEMATICS 401, 102, 403 — Introductory Real Variables 
(3-0-3) . Fall, Winter, Spring, respectively. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
31 1 and consent of instructor. 

MATHEMATICS 111 — Complex Variables (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: Mathematics 203. 

142 



\! \ l 1 1 1M \ l K.s i ;i. i.rj Geoni tries 1-0 I Winter, 

Ipring, respectively. Prerequisite: Consent <>i instructor. 

Hilberi Plane, Projective, and othei Non-Euclidean Geometries. 

M \ llll M \ll(.s 190 Seminar (2-0 2) . Spring. 

MUSIC 

(See Listing undei Depai tmenl oi Fine Arts) 

NURSING 
(See Listing undei Department ol Allied I [ealth Services) 

NTJ I RJ I ION 
(See Listing under Department of Allied Health Services) 

PHILOSOPHY 
(See listing undei Department ol Histor) and Political Science) 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Professor Roy ). Sims, Head; Assistant Professors Lawrence M. 
Tapp (leave of absence) , B. Alexander, and G. Bedwell; Instructor B. 
Backus, and Sylvia Sanders. 

Dining the freshman year, students should take Physical Education 
111 (Fall), Physical Education 112, (Winter), and Physical Education 
113 (Spring). During the sophomore year, students should elect any 
other three Physical Education courses. Students unable to participate 
in the regular program should plan an alternate program with the 
Head of the Department of Physical Education. For other department 
regulations see "Physical Education Program" under Academic Resrula- 
tions. 

Course Offerings 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 111 — Conditioning Course (0-2-1). 
Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, 
road work, duel combatives, and simple games. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 112 — Team Sports (0-2-1). Winter. 

Consists of two from the following: basketball, field hockey, soc- 
cer, speedball, and volleyball. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 113 — Elementary Swimming (0-2-1). 
Fall, Winter, and Spring. (Physical Education 202 or Physical Edu- 
cation 203 may be substituted for Physical Educati >n 113). 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 115 — Officiating of Football (1-3-2). 
Fall. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual ex- 
perience in officiating in class games, intramural games, approved com- 
munity recreation games, and public school games. Elective credit. 
Students must have permission of the department head or course in- 
structor to enroll. 

143 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 116 — Officiating of Basketball (1-3-2). 
Winter. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual ex- 
perience in officiating in class games, intramural games, approved com- 
munity recreation games, and public school games. Elective credit ex- 
cept when substituted for Physical Education 112 (Team Sports). 
Students must have permission of the department head or course in- 
structor to enroll. Only one of the officiating courses will satisfy a 
sophomore elective courses. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201 — Elementary Tennis (0-2-1). Fall 
and Spring. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 202 — Senior Life Saving Course in 
Swiming (0-2-1) . Spring. (May be substituted for Physical Education 
113). 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 203 — Water Safety Instructors' Course 
(1-2-1). Spring. (May be substituted for Physical Education 113). Pre- 
requisite: Physical Education 202 or American Red Cross Senior Life 
Saving. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 204 — First Aid (3-0-1). Fall and 
Winter. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 205 — Folk Rhythms (0-2-1) . Spring. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 206 — Beginning Modern Dance (0-2- 
1) . Winter. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 207 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-2-1) . 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 208 — Golf or other Adult Recreative 
Sports (0-2-1) . Fall and Spring. 

Golf, ping-pong, pool, card games, chess, checkers, shuffleboard, 
and other quiet games. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 232 — Bowling (0-2-1) . Winter. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 233 — Badminton (0-2-1). Spring. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 234 — Trampoline (0-2-1). Winter. 

The student is taught the proper care and use of the trampoline. 
Under strict supervision he learns to perform the following skills; seat 
drop, knee drop, front drop, back drop, pull over, cradle, turn-table, 
swivel hips, spotting, and somersault. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 236 — Intermediate Modern Dance (0- 
2-1). Prerequisite: Physical Education 206. 

A continuation of Physical Education 206 with emphasis on dy- 
namics, composition, and choreography. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 320 — Health and Physical Education 
for the Elementary School Teacher (3-2-5). Fall and Spring. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 
(See listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics) 

144 



PHYSICS 

(See listing undei Departmenl oJ Chemistry and Physics) 

DEPARTMEN1 OF POLICE ADMINISTRATION 

Coordinator, Lawrence E. Mahany; Assistant Professoi Ryan 

Course Quarter Hours 

English 121 and Egnlish 228 10 

Sistor) 251* or History 252* _ 5 

Political Science 113*, 305 - 10 

liolog) 101, 102 oi Chemistr) 121, 122 or Physics 21 I. 212 10 

Physical Education 111, 113, 202, 204, and two courses in 

defense tactics 6 

?s\ c hology 20 1 5 

Sociology 201, 305, and 350 15 



61 
Course (Police Science) Quarter Hours 

■*olice Administration 101: Introduction to Law Enforcement (5-0-5) 

?olice Administration 102: Police Patrol (5-0-5) 

°olice Administration 103: Criminal Law (5-0-5) 

Police Administration L04: Criminal Evidence (5-0-5) 

Police Administration 201: Police Administration . '5-0-5) 

Notice Administration 202: Criminal Investigation (5 0-5) 

^olice Administration 203: Introduction to Criminalistics (5-0-5) 

FIRST YEAR 

Fall — Police Administration 101; English 121; Physical Education 
111: Political Science 113. 

Winter — Police Administration 102; Sociology 201; Physical Ed- 
ication 113; History 251 or 252. 

Spring — Police Administration 201; Psychology 201; Physical 
Education 201; Sociology 350. 

SECOND YEAR 

Fall — Police Administration 103; Sociology 305; Physical Edu- 
:ation: Defense Tactics; Science; Police Administration 104. 

Winter. — Police Administration 202; Physical Education: Defense 
Factics; Science; Police Administration 203. 

Spring — Political Science 305; Ph)sical Education 202; Speech 228. 
COURSE OFFERINGS 

POLICE ADMINISTRATION 101 — Introduction to Law En- 
forcement (5-0-5) . Fall. 

Survey of law enforcement — the role, history and development, 

•If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted by 
by examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see page 56) , 
the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 

145 



constitution aspects, modern police practices, and the functions of! 
other agencies involved in the administration <>t criminal justice. Career 
Orientation. 

POLICE ADMINISTRATION 102 — Police Patrol (5-0-5). Win- 
ter. 

Basic operation of the police patrol functions; the responsibilities 
ol patrol officers; purposes, methods and types of police patrol. Deter- 
mination of patrol beats, areas and deployment. 

POLICE ADMINISTRATION 103 — Criminal Law (5-0-5). Fall 

The nature, sources and types of criminal law. The classification 
and analysis of crimes and criminal acts in general and the examination 
of selected specific criminal offenses. 

POLICE ADMINISTRATION 101 — Criminal Evidence (5-0-5) 
Fall. 

Reviews laws of arrest, search ^ seizure, rights & duties of officers 
and citizens and rules of evidence. General court procedures will be 
discussed. 

POLICE ADMINISTRATION 201 — Police Administration (5- 
0-5) . Spring. 

The contemporary law enforcement agency, its functions, struc- 
ture and operational techniques; implications of generalized and specia 
lized units. Principles of organizing, staffing, budgeting, controlling 
coordinating, planning and research in law enforcement. Prerequisites: 
P.A. 101 and P.A. 102. 

POLICE ADMINISTRATION 202 — Criminal Investigation I 
0-5) . Winter. 

Introduction to criminal investigation procedures including theon 
of investigation, case preparation, interrogation, and special problem; 
in criminal investigation. 

POLICE ADMINISTRATION 203 — Introduction to Criminal 
istics (5-0-5) . Winter. 

The scientific aspects of criminal investigation with emphasij 
upon crime scene recording, collecting and preservation of evidence 
and the examination of evidence. Advanced criminialistics are dis 
cussed to the extent necessary to familiarize the student with the police 
science laboratory. Prerequisite: P.A. 202. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Science) 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Worthineton. Head; Associate Professor Snellgrove 
Assistant Professors Coyle, Ralston, Satterfield. 

Students who intend to major in psychology should complete Psy 
chology 101-102 before the end of their sophomore vear. Students ar< 

146 



■rongl) advised to complete as man) <>i the general education require- 
ments .is possible In -loir entering then junioi year. 

I. Majoi Field Requirements 

\ Ml ol the following: Psychology 102, 512, HO, 111, 412. 

B. rhree ol the following: Psychology 507, 508, N>9, U9. 

C. Two ol the following: Psychology 503, 506, 511. 

II. Related Fields 

A. Biology 101, 102. 

B. Mathematics 21 1. 

C. Approved elec tives. 

Course Offerings 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

\\ rHROPOLOGY 201 - Man and His Culture (5-0-5). Offered 

on demand. 

An introduction to the study of man as a cultural animal, the 
development of human societies from preliterate beginnings, the rise 
(of complex social organizations with an outline study of the majoi 
cultures developed by man. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY 101 — General Psychology (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts and methods of the 
science of behavior. Discussion and demonstrations assist in surveying 
all the areas of psychology. Psychology 101 is prerequisite to all other 
courses in the department. 

PSYCHOLOGY 102 — Advanced General Psychology (4-2-5). Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 101. Spring and Fall. 

An extension of the concepts introduced in Psychology 101. Experi- 
ments are designed to acquaint the student with the techniques of be- 
havioral analysis. 

PSYCHOLOGY 301 — Educational Psychology (5-0-5). Prere- 
quisite: Psychology 101. Spring and Fall. 

The application of behavioral science to the problem of learning 
in the classroom. Primarily for teacher preparation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 303 — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 101. Spring. 

The study of the behavior of others as determinants of the be- 
havior of the individual. The cultural milieu and group pressures will 
be examined in terms of their effects on behavior. 

PSYCHOLOGY 305 — Developmental Psychology (5-0-5). Prere- 
quisite: Psychology 101. Winter and Spring. 

A study of the origin and development of psychological processes. 

147 



The effects of maturational, learning and social variables on human 
behavior are examined. 

PSYCHOLOGY 307 — Experimental Psychology I. Perception 
(4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Fall. 

An experimental-theoretical approach to the nature of perception. 
Special attention is given to the psychophysical methods. 

PSYCHOLOGY 308 — Experimental Psychology IE Learning and 
Motivation (4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Winter. 

An examination of the methodology and theory associated with 
the various forms of learning and their motivational concomitants. 

PSYCHOLOGY 309 — Experimental Psychology HE Physiological 
Psychology (4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psychology 101 and Biology 101, 102. 
Spring. 

Introduction to the biological bases of behavior. The structure 
and function of the nervous system are studied and related to the be- 
havior of humans and other organisms. 

PSYCHOLOGY 311 — Theories of Personality (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Psychology 101. Spring. 

A study of selected personalty theories with emphasis on normal 
behavior. Attention will be given to both experimental and clinical 
data. The determinants of personality structure and the development 
of personality will be examined from divergent points of view. 

PSYCHOLOGY 312 — Measurement in Psvchology (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 101 and Math 211. Fall. 

An examination of the theory of measurement. Reliability and 
validity techniques are discussed using current psychological tests as 
examples. 

PSYCHOLOGY 319 — Animal Behavior (4-2-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 101. Winter. 

A study of the adaptations and behaviors with which living or- 
ganisms cope effectively with their environment. The laboratory will 
provide experience in animal care, training, and experimentation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 320 — Industrial Psychology (5-0-5) . Prerequisite: 
Psvchology 101. Winter. 

The applications of psychology to the problems of industry. Pri- 
marily for business majors. 

PSYCHOLOGY 405 — Behavior Disorders (5-0-5). Prerequisite: I 
Psychology 101. Winter. 

A study of deviant behavior, types of behavior disorders, and 
methods of behavior modification. Application of principles derived 
from basic research will be emphasized. 

PSYCHOLOGY 410 — Historv of Psychology (5-0-5). Open only 
to psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. Fall. 

A study of the basic ideas in psychology from early animism to 
modern behavioristics. Special attention is given to the philosophical 
basis at various times in the history of psychology. 

148 



PSYCHOLOGY HI Senioi Seminal (5-0-5). Open only to 

senioi psychology majors 01 l>\ invitation <>l the professor. Winter. 

A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on selected 
con tern porar) issues in psychology. Specific content will var) from year to 
■ear. 

PSYCHOLOG\ 112 Senioi Seminar (5-0-5). Open only to 
lenior psychology majors oi l>\ invitation ol the professor. Spring. 

A reading and discussion group which will concentrate <>n selected 
contemporary issues in psychology. Specific content will var) from yeai 
to year. 

PSYCHOLOGY 150 - [ndependent Study ( (1-5) -0- (1-5) ) . Open 
onl\ 1>\ imitation of the professor. Offered on demand. 

SOCIAL WELFARE 

.SOCIAL WELFARE 101 — Introduction to Social Welfare. (5- 
0-5) . Offered each quarter. 

A study of the origins and evolution of. the American Social Wel- 
fare system. 

SOCIAL WELFARE 303 — Methods in Social Work (5-0-5). 
prerequisite: Social Well are 101 or Sociology 201. Spring and Fall. 

An examination of methodology in casework, group work, and 
community organization. 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 201 — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. 

An introduction to the concepts and methods of the science of 
human group behavior. Includes the study oi socialization, the role of the 
individual in society, and the major institutions and processes. 

SOCIOLOGY 305 — Criminology (5-0-5) . Prerequisite: Sociology 
201. Fall and Winter. 

A survey of the nature of crime, criminal statistics, and theories 
of cricinal causation and control. An examination of crime as a sc3ci.il 
problem, the criminal, and theories of punishment, treatment and pre- 
vention. 

SOCIOLOGY 350 — Social Problems (5-0-5) . Prerequisite: Soci- 
ology 201. Winter and Spring. 

An examination of behavioral deviancy and social disorganization 
in the context of sociological theory. 

SOCIOLOGY 353 or HISTORY 353 — Prespectives on Black 
Experience in the United States. (5-0-5) . Offered on demand. 

Study of historic and current trends in selected frames of reference 

149 



of experiences encountered by black people in the United States, em- 
phasizing social movements and social change, urban and institutional 
processes, social values and personality formation. 

SPANISH 
(See listing under Department of Foreign Languages) 

SPECIAL EDUCATION (Speech Correction) 
(See listing under Department of Education) 

SPEECH 

(See listing under Department oi" English and Speech) 

ZOOLOGY 

(See listing under Department ol Biology) 



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INDEX 



Academic Advisement o, 62, /:> 

Icademic Regulations :)1 

Accelerated Program, High School 29 

Accounting Major Requirements ' () ' 

Administration, Officers * 

Admission to Accelerated Program - 30 

Admissions — - - 24 

Advanced Placement 26 

UK isemenl 55, 62, 75 

llied Health Services Dept 94 

Alumni Office 65 

Anthropology Course 147 

\pplication Forms „_. 24 

Application Requirements 24 

Art Courses 125 

Associate in Arts 90 

Athletics 65 

Attendance Regulations 59 

Auditing 61 

Bachelor of Arts Requirements 73 

Bachelor of Business Administration 86 

Bachelor of Science Requirements 73 

Biology Courses 101 

Biology Department 101 

Biology Requirements 101 

Botany Courses 103 

Business Administration Courses 105 

Business Education, Program for Teachers 80 

Business Education Courses 109 

Calendar, Academic 6 

Chemistry Courses 1 12 

Chemistry Degree Requirements 112 

Chemistry and Physics Department 111 

Chinese Courses 128 

Clubs 63 

CommercenSecretarial Programs 87 

151 



» 



i 



Commision, Armstrong State College 

Community Services, Office 2? 

Conduct 63 

Continuing Education Students 28 

Counselling Services 62 j 

Course Load 53 

Course Offerings, Index 9!l| ( 

Dean's List 51 

Degree Requirements, Regulations 5i aI . 

Degrees Offered 73, 91^ 

Dental Hygiene, A.S. Degree 89, 9i ^ 

Dental Hygiene Courses 9lj all 

Dental Hygiene Education 9ij a[ 

Dropping Courses 6j | aI 

Economics Courses 101 j at 

Economics Major Requirements 10*. [ at 

Education Courses 11( y 

Education Degree Requirements 7< ^ 

Education Department 1 1( 

Engineering Courses 14(1 

English Courses 1 2!| 

English Degree Requirements 12 

English-Speech Department \2,\ 

En tomology Courses 1 

Evening Classes 2' 

Faculty 1 

Fees 4 

Finance - Major requirements 10' | 

Financial Aid 41 

Fine Arts Department 12 

Foreign Languages Department 12 

Foreign Students 3 

French Courses 12 

French Degree Requirements 12! 

Geography Course 13( 

German Courses 1 31 

Heads of Departments K 

Health g, 

Health Course qj 

152 



cbrcw Courses 
listo] \ of ( lollege 
Iis!oi\ Courses 

j? i s i o i \ Degree Requirements 
listor) and Political Science Department 
Honor System 
lonoi s 

lousing --.- 

■dust] ial Co op Program 



Registration Fee 
ary 



il)i.n\ Science Courses 

Ian age me nt Major Requirements 

lathematics Major Requirements 

lathematics Courses 

|a them a tics Degree Requirements 

lathematics Department 

tedical Technology 



21 

i ;; 

i 1 1 

i:::; 

51 

59 

G5 

- 23 
. 41 

22 

119 

„ 105 

... 140 

- 140 

_ 139 

_ 139 

_ 88 

12G 
_ 125 
89, 94 
_ 95 
... 94 
__ 9G 



insic Courses 

lusic Degree Requirements 

jJursing, A. A. Degree : 

Nursing Courses 

ffursing Degree Requirements 

Nutrition Course 

Organizations ___ 63 

mentation 32, 62 

lit of State Tuition 43 

*hilosophy Courses _.. . 136 

Physical Education Courses 143 

Physical Education Department 143 

Physical Education Program .... 59 

Physical Science Courses ..... 114 

^hysics Courses 115 

I Placement, Office of 63 

Police Administration, A.A. Degree ... 89, 145 

Police Administration Courses 145 

Police Administration Department 145 

Political Science Courses 137 

^Political Science Degree Requirements 137 

I 

153 



Pre-Professional Programs 21 

Probation and Dismissal 60 

Psychology Courses 147 

Psychology Degree Requirements 146 

Psychology and Sociology Department 146 

Publications 64 

Quarter On-Trial 27 

Readmission of Former Students 29 

Refunds 43 

Regents 9 

Registration 32 

Reports and Grades 58 

Residency Requirements 32 

Scholarships 45 

September Practicum 76 

Social Welfare Degree 89, 149 

Sociology Courses 149 

Spanish Courses 131 

Special Education (Speech Correction) Courses 119 

Speech Correction, Program in 77 

Speech Courses 124 

Staff, Administrative 10 

Student Activity Fee 41 

Student Code of Conduct 66 

Student Exchange Program 23 

Student Government 64 

Student Services and Activities 62 

Student Teaching 76 

System-wide Achievement Testing Program 61 

Teacher Education 74 

Two-year Degrees 21 

Transfer Applicants, Requirements 27 

Transient Students 29 

Veterans 31 

Vocational Rehabilitation 31 

Withdrawal gl 

Zoology Courses 203 



154 



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